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    Call for Papers: Livestock as Global and Imperial Commodities
    Livestock as Global and Imperial Commodities: Economies, Ecologies and Knowledge Regimes, c. 1500 – present Annual Commodities of Empire International Workshop, Freie Universität Berlin, 14-15 July 2022 Livestock has played a crucial role in imperial politics, economies and societies over the past centuries. The expansion of animal raising often went hand in hand with settler colonialist land expropriation, and various animals were in many places crucial to colonial conquest and exploitation. Moreover, livestock and livestock commodities, such as meat, wool, hides and tallow were traded and consumed within and across boundaries, both imperial and non-imperial. Such commodification processes not only relied on settler livestock frontiers, but also on the transformation of indigenous livestock economies, knowledge regimes and local ecologies. They were closely tied to the global expansion of capitalism and, as such, also affected non-colonial and post-imperial spaces across the world in many similar, yet sometimes also diverging ways. However, compared to agricultural cash crops and minerals, imperial and global histories of livestock are still quite rare. This workshop addresses this important research gap. It aims to explore the different (political, economic, societal, cultural, religious, ecological and scientific) dimensions of livestock production and commodification in global and imperial history.   We broadly define livestock as domesticated animals that are raised for multiple purposes, most notably for their labour (draft, pack, riding and powering machinery); their skin, hair, horns, shells, feathers, etc. (for clothing or ornaments); their meat, milk and eggs (for nutritional purposes); their manure (as fertilizer or fuel); their body parts (for medicinal purposes); their monetary value (for barter, savings and marriage payments); or their symbolic value (for religious uses, punishments and displays of prestige). Our definition includes cattle, water buffaloes, yaks, reindeer, sheep, goats, pigs, camels, elephants, horses, mules, donkeys, llamas, alpacas, poultry and ostriches, and we would also welcome papers on (shell)fish farming. Yet, we would exclude wild animals that are hunted, exhibited and/or subjected to conservationist measures. These will be addressed in a second workshop in 2023.   Potential paper topics may relate to: ·     the politics of livestock production: colonial control over land and/or pastoralist societies, local/imperial food security, capitalist expansion, international organisations such as FAO, etc. ·     modes of livestock raising: nomadic, semi-nomadic and settled pastoralism and mixed farming, large-scale ranching, industrial animal farming, ownership by international corporations, etc. ·     social conditions and effects of livestock production: social stratification, gender, race, caste, religious, and ethnic roles, changing labour forms and relations, (legal) regimes of land and livestock ownership, etc. ·     environmental consequences: deforestation, formation of grasslands, soil erosion, (water) pollution, global warming through methane emissions, etc. ·     veterinary, agricultural and environmental knowledge and technologies: (non-)circulation of knowledge, conflicting knowledge regimes and actors, scientific institutions and practices such as experimental stations, cross-breeding and selective breeding techniques, practices of disease control, etc. ·     processing of livestock commodities: slaughterhouses, processing of hides, wool and dairy, techniques for dried, salted, canned, frozen and chilled meat, etc. ·     trading infrastructures and networks: transport technologies, ports, trade companies, credit mechanisms, etc. ·     livestock labour: transport, warfare, role in agriculture, forestry and mining for the production of other (global) commodities such as  sugar, teak or silver, etc. ·     local, imperial and global uses of livestock commodities: for food, clothing, fertilizer, medicine, payments, etc.   We are interested in cases from all geographical regions and in approaches from various disciplines. In addition to historians, we welcome papers from anthropologists, sociologists, veterinary scientists, zoologists, environmentalists and other scholars working on the global and imperial history of livestock and livestock commodities.   This two-day workshop is a collaborative venture between the Commodities of Empire British Academy Research Project and the Commodifying Cattle Research Project funded by the German Research Foundation at the Free University Berlin. Following the long-standing practice of Commodities of Empire workshops, papers will be grouped in thematic panels, pre-circulated to all workshop participants, and panel discussions will be opened by a chair or discussant. Paper-givers will then have the possibility to reply succinctly, and this will be followed by open discussion. Papers presented at the workshop may be considered for publication in the Commodities of Empire Working Papers series: https://commoditiesofempire.org.uk/publications/working-papers/. We strongly encourage graduate students and other early career scholars to propose papers. Costs of accommodation in and, within certain limits, travel to Berlin will be covered. We have special funding for scholars coming from the Global South. Please note, however, that while we aim to hold the workshop on site at the Free University Berlin, we might have to hold the workshop virtually, or in a hybrid form, depending on the evolution of the Covid-19 pandemic and the (travel) restrictions it entails.   Please e-mail expressions of interest, with a title and an abstract of no more than 300 words, by 31 January 2022 to Samuël Coghe, Free University Berlin, samuel.coghe@fu-berlin.de. We will notify authors about the acceptance of their papers by 15 March 2022. They will then be asked to submit a draft paper of approx. 5,000-6,000 words (not counting footnotes and bibliography) 3 weeks prior to the event. Read more
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    By: Raquel Acosta
    Due Date: Jan, 31, 2022
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    English Access Microscholarship Program  - Kenya
    The US Embassy Nairobi invites interested applicants to submit proposals from implementing partners for 2022 -2023 English Access Microscholarship Program (Access) in response to the reference Notice of Funding Announcement (NOFO). Due to the uncertain situation with the COVID19 pandemic in Kenya, the Program might be delayed or postponed. There might also be restrictions in numbers of people who can attend public gatherings, travels and curfews hours, which might affect the implementation of the program. In this regard the submitted proposal should have an innovative component to engage Access students both in person and virtually. For virtual programs, proposals should offer creative ideas for remote/online content delivery, online/virtual promotional activities, and virtual participant/audience follow-up.    Background Information  The English Access Microscholarship Program (Access) is a global program supported by the U.S Department of State. Access provides highly motivated economically disadvantaged youth with an opportunity to learn English language skills and enhance leadership through teaching the basics of American culture and values of democratic development and civic engagement. It gives participants skills that may lead to better jobs and educational prospects. The program targets 13 – 20 year old students from underprivileged families to participate in afterschool instructions and intensive sessions. Since its inception in 2004, approximately 198,408 students in more than 95 countries have participated in the Access Program. In Kenya, there are more than 780 Access alumni, many of who are studying at, or have graduated from, top-tier universities throughout the country. The Access program must provide two years of English study, consisting of at least 180 hours of instruction per year.   The goal of the Access Program is to equip bright, talented, economically deserving students with a range of global citizenship skills anchored by the core components of enhanced English language skills and a stronger Kenyan-U.S. cross-cultural understanding. The global citizenship skills aim to build individuals with stronger self-esteem and a keen sense of public service in an increasingly globalized world. Global citizenship skills include, but are not limited to, critical and creative thinking, leadership, information technology, civic outreach, and media literacy. Participants should commit to enroll in classes during the full two year program. Selected participants must be bright, economically-disadvantaged secondary school students with a beginning level of English, ideally in Form 2 at the beginning of the program in January 2022. Students will graduate with certificates of completion from the U.S. Embassy Nairobi at the end of their two-year program.     PROGRAM DESCRIPTION  The Public Diplomacy Section of the U.S. Embassy in Nairobi announces an open competition to equip bright, talented, economically deserving students to learn English, develop civic engagement and leadership skills and gain multicultural awareness through teaching the basis of American culture and vales. Project-based and task-based approaches should be employed in order to help learners to understand and work on authentic local and global challenges. The English language component should break from traditional models to deliver a more meaningful, interactive language learning experience centered on the learner. Project-based and experiential approaches should be employed in order to help the learner use English to understand, discuss, and resolve authentic local and global challenges. Enhancement and off-site immersion activities should help extend the language learning experience beyond the classroom walls. Access classrooms should serve as strong educational models for a community. Programs should, where possible, aim at sharing new and relevant practices with English teachers in other schools, especially those from which the Access students are chosen. Other members of the community, including interested administrators, content teachers, and future educators studying at nearby universities, can also be included in outreach efforts. The participants’ parents should also be made aware of what and how the students are learning, and appraised of what they can do at home to encourage their children to learn more effectively. Civic outreach activities should further cement the connection between the Access program and community.    Providers can submit proposals of varying size with a minimum of $50,000 USD and a maximum of $175,000 USD, depending on the Provider’s capability, infrastructure, and geographic spread. The grantee should work with students in Mombasa and/or Isiolo Counties. The project supports the Embassy’s strategic goal of sustaining Kenyan economy to achieve rapid economic growth. Program proposals should include using U.S. exchange program alumni, and the target region is Mombasa and/or Isiolo Counties. Ideal partners include Educational Institutions, non-profit organizations that use innovative methods to reach to economically disadvantaged youths in this region.    U.S. Embassy Nairobi reserves the right to split the project between two or more providers and may request providers to adjust their final proposals and budgets as necessary. All possible costs – instruction, books/materials, transportation, enhancement activities, administration, food and possible accommodation for intensive sessions – should be covered.   For more information about this opportunity or to apply, please visit grants.gov Read more
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    By: Derek Tobias
    Due Date: Dec, 8, 2021
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    U.S. Mission to Nigeria: Ambassadors Fund for Cultural Preservation
    The U.S Mission to Nigeria is accepting proposals from eligible organizations seeking project funding through the Ambassadors Fund for Cultural Preservation (AFCP) for fiscal year 2022. The deadline for the submission of proposals is December 5, 2021 at 11:59pm.    AFCP Program Objectives:  The Ambassadors Fund for Cultural Preservation (AFCP) Grants Program was established in 2001 at the request of the Congress, reflected in the Conference Report on the Departments of Commerce, Justice, and State, the Judiciary, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act of 2001 (P. L. 106-553). AFCP was launched to preserve cultural heritage and to demonstrate U.S. respect for other cultures. The aim is to preserve of major ancient archaeological sites, historic buildings and monuments, and major museum collections that have an historical or cultural significance to the cultural heritage of Nigeria.   Appropriate project activities may include:    a) Anastylosis (reassembling a site from its original parts);  b) Conservation (addressing damage or deterioration to an object or site);  c) Consolidation (connecting or reconnecting elements of an object or site);  d) Documentation (recording in analog or digital format the condition and salient features of an object, site, or tradition);  e) Inventory (listing of objects, sites, or traditions by location, feature, age, or other unifying characteristic or state);  f) Preventive Conservation (addressing conditions that threaten or damage a site, object, collection, or tradition);  g) Restoration (replacing missing elements to recreate the original appearance of an object or site, usually appropriate only with fine arts, decorative arts, and historic buildings);  h) Stabilization (reducing the physical disturbance of an object or site).    Competition Format: Both AFCP small and large grants are now combined to a single program and projects will be selected in two rounds. During Round 1, embassies will submit concept notes for both small and large projects that focus on the public diplomacy objectives that may be accomplished through the proposed project. Applicants invited to participate in Round 2 will flesh out the technical aspects of the proposed project and submit a full application. Awards will range from $10,000 to $500,000.   For more information about this opportunity or to apply, please visit grants.gov Read more
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    By: Derek Tobias
    Due Date: Dec, 5, 2021
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    Innovations in Eliminating Neglected Tropical Diseases
    Background The elimination of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) is feasible but its progress is hindered by the suboptimal implementation of available interventions. Challenges faced by NTD programs can range from poor targeting of interventions, low treatment coverage among specific sub-groups, and lack of surveillance systems that can meet the sensitivity and specificity requirements for the endgame of disease elimination. These challenges could be addressed by the development of innovative solutions but also by the application of existing tools and technologies which are effectively used by other health programs, including polio, malaria and immunization. We see an opportunity to identify and demonstrate feasibility of innovative solutions and new applications of existing technologies to address the challenges faced by national NTD programs in mapping, targeting, disease and vector surveillance, and other endgame strategies. The Challenge We have partnered with Kikundi, a community of practice for NTD program managers in Africa, to identify areas for transformational innovation in service of national NTD programs. We invite proposals that will address one or more of the following areas: Methods to rapidly map NTDs, including integrated mapping Methods to better target existing interventions Strategies to target subgroups routinely missed by programs Approaches to vector surveillance Integrated surveillance that leverages other health surveillance platforms Strategies for post-elimination surveillance, including cross-border surveillance. Funding level: up to USD $200,000 for each project, with a grant term of up to 18 months depending on the scope of the project. We are looking for proposals that: Are led by institutions, which could be ministries of health, based in sub-Saharan Africa (other global partners may be included but at least 80% of funding should go to sub-Saharan Africa) Demonstrate partnership with national NTD programs Propose innovations and applications that are scalable Have a plan for how the proposed solution would be tested or validated, and report its impact on NTD elimination goals and program efficiency For more information about this opportunity or to apply, please visit the Grand Global Challenges website. Read more
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    By: Derek Tobias
    Due Date: Jan, 13, 2022
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    Digital Health Services for Pregnant Women to Support Antenatal Risk Stratification in Sub-Saharan A
    Background Digital health is revolutionizing the landscape of global healthcare. Solutions such as telemedicine, electronic medical records, and digitally enabled devices help to provide accessible, high-quality care around the world. These services have the potential to be especially impactful in low-income areas where care provided by highly trained individuals is not as common. Digital health can empower individual patients by enabling them to manage their own healthcare journeys. It can also drive systemic change through affordable, wide-reaching services that reduce the strain on healthcare professionals and facilities in low-resource settings. The Maternal, Newborn & Child Health Discovery & Tools team believes that the ability to leverage digital health systems can enhance care and reduce adverse birth outcomes in low-and-middle income countries. One area of focus is the stratification of pregnancy risk to ensure that patients are put on the appropriate care pathway. This can enable tertiary facilities to focus their constrained resources on high-risk pregnancies, while low-risk pregnancies are managed at lower levels of care. Antenatal Risk Stratification (ARS) is a portfolio of devices and data that predicts a pregnant woman’s risk of experiencing adverse birth outcomes in early pregnancy. Building and implementing an ARS solution requires three key steps. 1) Collect data on pregnant women (e.g., patient history, clinical data, and diagnostic results with an emphasis on ultrasound and hemoglobin assessment). 2) Use data as inputs in a robust, AI decision model that accurately predicts a pregnant woman’s risk of adverse birth outcomes. 3) Support clinical decision making by using the predicted risk to pre-emptively triage patients across different levels of the healthcare system. Through this process, ARS would enable more efficient resource allocation by sending the riskiest patients to high-level facilities, while referring low-risk patients to community or public health centers. ARS would aim to improve the quality of care for pregnant women by ensuring that they can receive the right level of care. Developing and delivering an ARS solution will require a robust digital backbone including tools for data collection, automated analytics, and platforms that connect to patients and healthcare providers. Before ARS can be successfully implemented, a landscape of digital health devices, partners, and services must be put into place. The Challenge We seek patient-facing digital health services for pregnant women that have been developed and are actively being provided in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). We will consider proposals for services that can support or contribute to our ARS vision via digital applications. Types of services that we would consider include: Engagement: Services that increase the participation of pregnant women in digital healthcare. (E.g., a platform to provide group antenatal care or a telemedicine platform that allows pregnant women to send medical questions to doctors by text) Adoption of existing platforms: Services that leverage existing digital systems/platforms to support pregnant women (e.g., contacting patients about care or scheduling using an existing messaging app like WhatsApp) Data collection: Services that collect data from pregnant women that could support clinical care. (E.g., a mobile app that allows pregnant women to track their pregnancy through metrics such as weight and fetal movement) Algorithm development: Services that use data from pregnant women to assess or make predictions about their health (e.g., a web-based tool where pregnant women can input information to receive an automatic assessment on whether or not they should see a doctor) We seek projects that will help us develop and deliver an ARS solution in sub-Saharan Africa. Proposals should endeavor to build upon existing solutions to help support ARS. Potential options include (but are not limited to): Researching implementation methods for a solution (e.g., conducting market research for an existing app that supports one or more of the objectives outlined above) Expanding the scope of a solution (e.g., translating a web-based app to mobile platforms to increase engagement) Adding features/functionality to a solution (e.g., adding cloud-based data collection to a mobile app) Improving the delivery of a solution (e.g., integrating a mobile app into an existing clinical health system) Funding level: up to USD $500,000 for each project, with a grant term of 6 to 24 months depending on the scope of the project. We will consider solutions that are: Developed and/or actively supported in sub-Saharan Africa (note: development/active support does not include cases when groups outside of SSA are testing their solutions on users in SSA) Delivered in sub-Saharan Africa Providing pregnancy-related services Offered directly to pregnant women (i.e., patient-facing) Currently available for use and interested in expansion Serving a substantial and active user base in sub-Saharan Africa (e.g., more than ~100 users) Digitally integrated (i.e., have a strong, technical component)   Clearly linked to the development and implementation of ARS Preference for solutions that reach women in both rural and urban areas in sub-Saharan Africa For more information about this opportunity or to apply, please visit the Grand Global Challenges website. Read more
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    By: Derek Tobias
    Due Date: Jan, 13, 2022
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    Building Malaria Modeling Capacity in Sub-Saharan Africa
    Background While mathematical modeling approaches have been used to understand malaria epidemiology and thepotential impact of antimalarial interventions for some time, National Malaria Control Programs (NMCPs)across sub-Saharan Africa are showing a growing interest in working with modeling units to shape theirNational Strategic Plans and Global Fund applications, as well to evaluate the ongoing impact of controlprograms. Furthermore, R&D partners in the malaria space are also increasingly working with modelers aspart of the product development process, using quantitative insights to shape target product profiles, plantrials, and understand the market for a given product.At present, many of the malaria modeling units contributing to these efforts are based in academic institutions in the Global North. At the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, we believe that having local modeling expertise embedded within or easily accessible to NMCPs will improve programs’ uptake of modeling as a strategic planning and evaluation tool, ultimately leading to improved data-driven decisionmaking by NMCPs. However, for this vision to be realized, the malaria modeling ecosystem across subSaharan Africa needs to be strengthened. The Challenge   This RFP seeks innovative approaches to building a stronger malaria mathematical modeling ecosystemin sub-Saharan Africa. We are looking for 1 to 3 years projects that will achieve one or more of the objectives below:• Increasing the number of Ph.D.-trained mathematical modelers with malaria expertise based atsub-Saharan African institutions• Improving NMCP’s understanding of and engagement with modeling approaches as a tool that cansupport strategic planning and/or evaluation work• Connecting malaria Product Development Partners (PDPs) with sub-Saharan African modelers• Bringing together discrete modeling units across sub-Saharan Africa to share expertise• Improving modelers’ access to timely, high-quality data   Funding level: up to USD $1,000,000 per year for each project, with a grant term of 1 to 3 years depending on the scope of the project.   For more information about the opportunity or to apply visit the Grand Global Challenges website. Read more
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    By: Derek Tobias
    Due Date: Jan, 13, 2022
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    Expressions of Interest: Training and Evaluation Datasets for African Languages
    The purpose of this call for EOI is to identify projects to submit full proposals to develop open and accessible datasets for machine learning applications that will enable natural language processing for languages in sub-Saharan Africa. The ability to communicate and be understood in one’s own language is fundamental to digital and societal inclusion. Natural language processing techniques have enabled critical AI applications that facilitate digital inclusion and improvements in numerous fields, including: education, finance, healthcare, agriculture, communication, and disaster response, among others. Many advances in both fundamental and applied NLP have stemmed from openly licensed and publicly available datasets.However, such open, publicly available datasets are scarce to non-existent for many African languages, and this means the benefits of NLP are not accessible to speakers of these languages. Where relevant datasets do exist, they are often based on religious, missionary, or judiciary texts, leading to outmoded language and bias. There is a need for openly accessible text, speech, and other datasets to facilitate breakthroughs based on NLP technologies for African languages.Lacuna Fund seeks Expressions of Interest (EOIs) from qualified organizations to develop open and accessible training and evaluation datasets for ML applications for NLP in sub-Saharan Africa. The TAP recognizes the importance of datasets that would create significant impact regardless of the number of speakers of the included language, as well as the need for multi-lingual datasets.EOIs may include, but not limited to: Collecting and/or annotating new data; Annotating or releasing existing data; Augmentation of existing datasets in all areas to decrease bias (such as gender bias or other types of bias or discrimination) or increase the usability of NLP technology in low- and middle-income contexts; Creating small, higher-quality benchmark data for NLP tasks in low-resource African languages. While the focus of Lacuna Fund is primarily on dataset creation, annotation, augmentation, and maintenance, proposals may include the development of a baseline model to ensure the quality of the funded dataset and/or to facilitate the use of dataset for socially beneficial applications.   For more information about the opportunity, click here Read more
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    By: Derek Tobias
    Due Date: Dec, 3, 2021
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    Yidan Prize 2022 for Advancing Ideas in Education
    Nominations are now open for the Yidan Prize 2022 to create a better world through education. The Yidan Prize is the most significant accolade in education. Tell us about the individuals and teams with the greatest potential, and we could help them on their way.Each year, the Yidan Prize is awarded to individuals and teams in two areas: Education Research: The theories of learning—science, psychology, statistics—that can help educators understand different approaches with a methodical lens. Education Development Policy and practice in learning: new methods and ways to make education more widespread—so they can champion techniques that work. We see these prizes—and the events and networks surrounding them—as a way to bring bright minds together to exchange ideas. That’s why the two prizes work in harmony: to build a network of educational experts who’re as strong in research as they are in practical application, in classrooms across the world.For example: we awarded our first Education Research Prize to Professor Carol Dweck: her pioneering work in growth mindset underpins and inspires practice. And as our 2020 Education Development laureates at CAMFED (the Campaign for Female Education) work with marginalized girls in sub-Saharan Africa, they partner with research insitutes to track what’s most effective, who’s benefiting and the costs.Where any individual or team’s work covers both research and development, we welcome two submissions: one for research and one for development.Our prizes are open to teams of up to three. That could be a research group working on a project together, or even several people contributing to the same idea from separate organizations—they don’t have to work together. If you want to nominate a larger team, choose up to three representatives. If a team does win either award, they’ll each get their own individual medal and certificate, and split the cash prize and project fund.   For more information or to nominate someone, please visit the Yidan Prize website Read more
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    By: Derek Tobias
    Due Date: Mar, 31, 2022
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    Enabling Community-Oriented Policing in Senegal
    The Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs of the U.S. Department of State announces an open competition for organizations to submit applications to carry out a project to help Senegalese law enforcement use community policing as a tool to improve the social contract with their citizens. The primary objective is to improve partnership with citizens and enhance governance and legitimacy through helping police and communities work more closely with one another.   Transforming policing services to better serve the public is easier said than done. It is about building trust between police and citizens. Empowering them to engage with citizens to fulfill the mission of police service, which have to be equitable, transparent and effective. The cascade of changes needed to effectively develop, implement, sustain, and communicate a citizen-oriented approach that reverses decades of underperformance and memories of past abuses is vast. Changing police culture can be as difficult, if not much more difficult, than changing policies, procedures, training. In order to develop a positive public perception, police officers need to engage with the citizens of its community to build a relationship of respect and trust.   This program aims to help the law enforcement agencies, defined as the national police, gendarmerie, and a local force known in French as the Agence de Securité de Proximité (ASP), in Senegal make progress towards the goal of institutionalizing community-oriented policing. The program will focus solely on Senegal throughout its duration, however INL will permit the grantee to employ regional collaboration as a means of achieving project outcomes.   For more information, please visit the listing on grants.gov Read more
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    By: Derek Tobias
    Due Date: Nov, 26, 2021
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    Twenty-second International Conference on Diversity in Organizations, Communities & Nations
    Dear Colleague,We are pleased to share with you the Call for Papers for the Twenty-second International Conference on Diversity in Organizations, Communities & Nations, University of Curaçao, Willemstad, Curaçao, 2–4 June 2022. Founded in 2000, the Diversity in Organizations, Communities & Nations Research Network is brought together by a shared interest in human differences and diversity, and their varied manifestations in organizations, communities, and nations. We aim to traverse a broad terrain, sometimes technically and other times socially oriented, sometimes theoretical and other times practical in their perspective, and sometimes reflecting dispassionate analysis while at other times suggesting interested strategies for action. Our aim is to build an epistemic community where we can make linkages across disciplinary, geographic, and cultural boundaries   The Twenty-second International Conference on Diversity in Organizations, Communities & Nations features research addressing the following annual themes and special focus: Themes and tension Scope and concerns Program   To learn more please visit: 2022 Conference | Diversity in Organizations, Communities & Nations Research Network (ondiversity.com) Read more
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    By: Raquel Acosta
    Due Date: Jun, 2, 2022
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    Conservation, Food, & Health Foundation Grant
    The Conservation, Food and Health Foundation seeks to protect natural resources, improve the production and distribution of food, and promote public health in Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East.  The foundation helps build the capacity of organizations and coalitions with grants that support research or improve the learning and generation of local solutions to complex problems.   The foundation supports projects that demonstrate local leadership and promote professional development in the conservation, agricultural, and health sciences; develop the capacity of local organizations; and address a particular problem or question in the field.  It prefers to support projects that address under-funded issues and geographic areas. The foundation supports special projects and programs of non-governmental organizations in three areas: conservation, food, and health. Examples of areas of interest within these fields follow, but are not meant to be exclusive.   Conservation Conservation grants help improve ecological and environmental conditions in low- and middle-income countries.  The foundation supports field research and related research activities, training, and technical assistance efforts that: help conserve ecosystems and protect biodiversity train local leaders in conservation and protection of resources, with an emphasis on technical and scientific training Food Food grants help research-based efforts to improve food and nutrition security and improve natural resources and ecosystems.  Areas of interest include projects that: promote or develop specific sustainable agriculture practices with potential to advance science and practice in other countries; test and refine innovative education and training interventions for small scale farmers; and advance new approaches to control pests and diseases affecting important food crops in low-income countries. Health The foundation supports public health programs that focus on populations rather than individuals.  It funds programs that emphasize disease prevention and health promotion over those that emphasize disease diagnosis, treatment, and care.  It supports research, technical assistance, and training projects that: improve public health through community-based efforts that address health promotion, disease prevention, family planning, and reproductive health; and increase the understanding and treatment of neglected tropical diseases The foundation supports most types of non-governmental organizations that can provide evidence of their nongovernmental status or charitable purpose. In general, the foundation will support: Non-governmental organizations (NGO) Nonprofit organizations Civil society organizations Community-based organizations Colleges, universities and academic institutions The foundation does not support businesses, government agencies,  humanitarian aid organizations, other foundations or churches.   For more information or to apply isit the CFH Foundation website. Read more
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    By: Derek Tobias
    Due Date: Jan, 1, 2022
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    Virtual Panel Discussion
    AP is excited to be hosting a virtual panel discussion regarding “The Role of Youth in Building Resilient Agri-Food Systems in Africa” this Thursday, October 21st at 8:30am-10:00 EDT. This discussion will be hosted with the help of The World Food Prize Foundation. The session will discuss evidence-based and pragmatic approaches that could foster productive youth engagements supportive of resilient agri-food systems in Africa. A panel of experts drawn from MSU and AAP partner institutions, Foundations and youth leaders will share insights highlighting the relevance of the agri-food system to youth livelihoods, the role youth could play to foster a resilient agri-food system, and salient trends, barriers and promising entry points for policy that could equip African youth with the skills, space and resources to effectively contribute to a productive and resilient agri-food system. Building a sustained and resilient agri-food system in Africa is an intergenerational mandate which demands the active engagement of African youth, and AAP is proud to be a part of this progress.   This side event is organized by Michigan State University’s Alliance for African Partnership under the auspices of the African Youth Transformation Platform, a collaborative and cross-disciplinary platform that seeks to transform the lives of African youth and their communities through research, capacity building, and advocacy that enhances youth development outcomes.   To register/learn more: https://msu.zoom.us/.../register/WN_iguFgRtBTYyhZi8hiZaCmA Read more
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    By: Raquel Acosta
    Due Date: Oct, 21, 2021
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