Browse

  • Open access eBooks and translations on global smartphone use (including in Uganda and Cameroon)
    We would like to draw your attention to the publication and Arabic, French and Portuguese translations of ‘The Global Smartphone: Beyond a youth technology’, an open access eBook which presents a series of original perspectives deriving from the Anthropology of Smartphones and Smart Ageing (ASSA) project. A multisited research project at UCL Anthropology with two fieldsites in Yaoundé, Cameroon and Kampala, Uganda. The book is based on simultaneous 16-months of research in 11 countries around the world. The research highlights the impact of the smartphone on the experience of mid-life (people who do not consider themselves either young or elderly) around the world and considers the implications of the use of smartphones in the field of mHealth. They are available as a free download from UCL Press. We believe it is very important, where we can, to ensure the availability of our research findings to people whose first language is not English and we would be grateful if you can spread news of these publications to any networks you are aware of. For example, those who might find this useful for teaching purposes. Two key ethnographies in the book were conducted in Yaoundé, Cameroon and Kampala, Uganda. Patrick Awondo, a Cameroonian anthropologist, conducted his research in a middle-class district within Yaoundé. Most of the people in this area are senior civil servants working in central administration or in other public affairs such as education and culture. Many residents of the district are also involved in private businesses or work for private companies. They come from all over the country and include some expatriates. Charlotte Hawkins, a British anthropologist, carried out her research primarily in Kampala. To understand the use of smartphones specifically, Charlotte drew on methods such as surveys, as well as open-ended interviews and participation in community activities such as women’s and savings groups. English: The Global Smartphone: Beyond a youth technologyArabic: الهاتف الذكي العالمي: ما وراء تكنولوجيا الشبابFrench: Le Smartphone Global: Au-delà d’une culture jeunePortuguese: O Smartphone Global: Uma tecnologia para além dos jovensFor more translations and publications please visit here: https://www.uclpress.co.uk/collections/series-ageing-with-smartphones Best wishes,Alex Clegg
    By: Raquel Acosta
  • +1
    Determinants of Small-Scale Irrigation Use for Poverty Reduction: The Case of Offa Woreda, Wolaita Z
    Small-scale irrigation is one of the agricultural activities used by rural farmers to improve the overall livelihood of the rural community by increasing income, securing food, meeting social requirements, and reducing poverty. ­e main objective of this study was to look into the factors that influence small-scale irrigation for poverty reduction among small-holder farmers in theOffa Woreda, Wolaita Zone. 
    By: Elias Bojago
    post image

  • New open access book: Rethinking Heritage for Sustainable Development (UCL Press)
    UCL Press is delighted to announce the publication of a new open access book that may be of interest to list subscribers. Rethinking Heritage for Sustainable Development, by Sophia Labadi.   The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) adopted by the UN in 2015 have influenced the actions of international and intergovernmental organisations and governments around the world, and have dictated priorities for international aid spending. Culture, including heritage, is often presented as fundamental to addressing the SDGs: since 2010, the United Nations has adopted no fewer than five major policy recommendations that assert its importance as a driver and enabler of development. Yet, heritage is marginalized from the Sustainable Development Goals.   Rethinking Heritage for Sustainable Development constitutes a substantial and original assessment of whether and how heritage has contributed to three key dimensions of sustainable development (namely poverty reduction, gender equality and environmental sustainability) within the context of its marginalisation from the Sustainable Development Goals and from previous international development agendas.   Sophia Labadi adopts a novel, inclusive, large-scale and systematic approach, providing the first comprehensive history of the international approaches on culture (including heritage) for development, from 1970 to the present day. This book is also the first to assess the negative and positive impacts of all the international projects implemented in sub-Saharan Africa by a consortium of UN organisations that aimed to provide evidence for the contribution of heritage for development in time for the negotiation of the SDGs. The book’s conclusions provide recommendations for rethinking heritage for development, while reflecting on the major shortcomings of the selected projects.   Free download: https://bit.ly/3m10NRK
    By: Raquel Acosta

  • Perceptions of online self- and peer-assessment: accounting students in a large undergraduate cohort
    Purpose Self-assessment (SA) and peer-assessment (PA) are considered useful tools in the development of lifelong learning and reflective skills. The authors implemented a teaching intervention using SA and PA amongst a large cohort of final year undergraduate students. The purpose of this study was to investigate students' perceptions of online SA and PA in order to understand the differences between these perceptions and to allow instructors to adopt differentiated instruction in developing a diverse student group's professional skills. Design/methodology/approach The research design adopted a mixed methods approach through the use of surveys that were administered before and after the SA and peer-assessment intervention in a taxation module taught at a large public South African university. Through the use of a series of open and closed questions students' perceptions on SA and peer-assessment were analysed both quantitatively and qualitatively. Findings The findings show that student perceptions of SA and peer-assessment differed significantly, where perceptions of SA were more positive than those towards PA. The findings indicate that SA and peer-assessment still present a challenge in an online context for large student cohorts, despite improved tracking, faster feedback and anonymity. Originality/value The study contributes to the literature by analysing students' perceptions about SA and peer-assessment in an accounting education context and in an online setting in South Africa.
    By: Teresa Pidduck
    post image

  • Sobering up in South Africa: The Sin Tax Consequences of a Pandemic
    In this article, the authors describe how the South African government has responded to the COVID‑19 crisis through fiscal measures, with a particular focus on the alcohol and tobacco prohibitions. Two severe and fairly unique measures implemented by the government were the prohibition of tobacco and the prohibition of alcohol (and related products). These two measures had an impact on the sin taxes received by the fiscus for the duration of the prohibitions but also had less obvious other short‑ and long‑term fiscal impacts, as well as various social, political and legal implications. This article reviews the tobacco and alcohol prohibitions, the responses by commentators and the short‑ and long‑term effects of these prohibitions on the fiscus and the economy, citing a particular need for a renewed focus on the excise duties on these two products.
    By: Teresa Pidduck
    post image

  • 'Semantic Gyrations' - When are Naartjies oranges? Beneath the surface of ABSA Bank Limited v CSARS
    This case note sets out the facts, issues, judgment — including submissions — and comments and analysis of the Absa case. The analysis of the case unearths a disjointedness between the legislature’s intention and the wording of certain administrative provisions, and criticises the ability of the administrative provisions contained in various tax Acts to work in concert with one another. A review of these administrative provisions by the legislature may be warranted in the light of this case. Furthermore, the judgment could also impact the interpretation and application of similar terms used in the reportable arrangement section of the TAA.The analysis also exposes some causes for concern regarding the interpretation of the GAAR that may undermine its ability to combat tax avoidance and suppress the mischief of taxpayers. Consequently, until possible appeal, this judgment may have far-reaching effects on the GAAR if the precedent set here is followed in other courts.
    By: Teresa Pidduck
    post image

  • MSU Scholar gives fresh insights on redesigning agricultural hand tools to Egerton University
    The Faculty of Agriculture was honored to host Dr Susan Wyche from Michigan State University (MSU) for a one-week visit to Egerton University that ran from 1 to 8 March 2022. Dr. Susan held a public lecture for staff and held a 3-day training workshop on “Considering Human-Centered Design (HCD) in Development Research” to students from diverse backgrounds including in Computer science, Agronomy and Engineering disciplines at CMRT building, Njoro Main Campus. The students developed and designed 6 project prototypes which include: Innovative and Efficient Water harvesting and treatment  for communities, Utilization of solar energy in drying and preservation of indigenous vegetables, Development of a drone for scaring Quelea qualea birds in rice irrigation schemes in Kenya, Queen bee rearing technology for increasing colonization of hives in drylands, Innovative technology for waste management in peri-urban areas to improve human health among others. Deputy Vice Chancellor Academic Affairs Prof Bernard Aduda commented the students for excellent ideas which can be deployed to solve farmers and societal problems in Kenya and promised to support. He also thanked the organizers of the training, Prof Susan for supporting student projects with USD 1400 as seed money for the projects and MSU for strong collaboration with Egerton University in all areas including joint projects, staff exchange and postgraduate supervision and value chain and policy analysis with Tegemeo Institute of Egerton University. Dr Wyche’s main objective through the public lecture and workshop was to give insights on solving real community problems using the human centered design (HCD) approach. She gave an example of her project ‘redesigning agricultural hand tools for small holder farmers in Western Kenya. Lecturers and scientists from Egerton also shared opportunities they can collaborate with MSU in agronomy, breeding and crop protection, agricultural mechanization, clean energy, agribusiness and ICT and computer applications and community development .  Before her workshop on 1 March, Dr Wyche paid a courtesy call to the Vice-Chancellor Prof Isaac Kibwage. She was accompanied by Prof. Patience Mshenga, Dean Faculty of Agriculture Prof. Paul Kimurto Director, Marketing and Resource Mobilization and Dr Miriam Charimbu, a researcher from the Department of Crops, Horticulture and Soils. Dr Charimbu doing her postdoctoral research at MSU within the Alliance for African Partnership (AAP) and is mentored by Dr Wyche and Prof. Kimurto.  Prof. Alexander Kahi who is the focal person for AAP at Egerton University also hosted the team at CoELIB Centre.   Egerton University is part of the Alliance for African Partnership, a consortium of MSU, ten leading African universities, and a distinguished network for African research institutes. The AAP Consortium is currently composed of ten member institutions: Michigan State University and eleven African institutions. Lilongwe University of Agriculture and Natural Resources (LUANAR) (Malawi), Makerere University (Uganda); L’université des Lettres et des Sciences Humaines de Bamako (ULSHB) (Mali), United States International University (USIU) (Kenya); University of Botswana, University of Dar es Salaam (Tanzania); University of Pretoria, l’Université Cheikh Anta DIOP de Dakar (UCAD) (Senegal) and University of Nigeria, Nsukka (Nigeria). The  vice chancellor and university management board wishes to than Prof Susan Wyche and MSU community for strong collaboration and supporting Egerton University  staff and students in various engagements.   To read more: Michigan State University Visiting Scholar gives fresh insights on redesigning agricultural hand tools to Egerton University
    By: Raquel Acosta

  • Is Liberia Ready for Monetary Union? Exploring the Convergence Criteria for Eco Adoption
    This is a policy brief document that I wrote along with my colleagues while working at the Liberian Ministry of Finance and Development and published in an online repository journal.
    By: Joe Greaves
    post image

  • Modeling with ARIMA-ARCH/GARCH Techniques to Estimate Weekly Exchange Rate of Liberia
    This empirical research focused on a weekly exchange rate volatility modeling, where I studied the distribution of the series and recommended to Central Bank authority the behavior pattern of the financial variable.
    By: Joe Greaves
    post image

  • Investigating Saving and Investment Relationship: Evidence from an ARDL Bounds Testing Approach
    This is an empirical economics research article that was published.
    By: Joe Greaves
    post image
  • +1
    Feminist Africa, Volume 2, Issue 2 (2021): Gender and Sexuality in African Futurism
    The newest issue of Feminist Africa is now available! The theme of the issue is "Gender and Sexuality in African Futurism." You can access the full issue at Current Issue - Feminist Africa. Learn more about Feminist Africa here.   TABLE OF CONTENTS Editorial: Gender and Sexuality in African Futurism · by Jacqueline-Bethel Tchouta Mougoué Feature Articles “How to Save the World from Aliens, Yet Keep Their Infrastructure”: Repurposing the “Master’s House” in The Wormwood Trilogy · by Jenna N. Hanchey and Godfried Asante When the Lagoons Remember: An Afroqueer Futurist Reading of “Blue Ecologies of Agitation” · by Kwame Edwin Otu “One Foot on the Other Side”: An Africanfuturist Reading of Irenosen Okojie’s Butterfly Fish (2015) and Akwaeke Emezi’s Freshwater (2018) · by Kelsey Ann McFaul Haunted Airports and Sexual Anxieties in Nana Nyarko Boateng’s “Swallowing Ice” · by Delali Kumavie Africanfuturism and the Reframing of Gender in the Fiction of Nnedi Okorafor · by Arit Oku Standpoint The Liquid Space where African Feminism and African Futurism Meet · by Minna Salami Fiction Land of My Dreams · by Juliana Makuchi Nfah-Abbenyi Exhibition The Afrofuturist Village · by Masiyaleti Mbewe Reviews  “Liberation is Necessarily an Act of Culture”: A Review of Spirit Desire · by Luam Kidane Methodologies in Caribbean Research on Gender and Sexuality  · by Sylvia Tamale  Fashioning Postfeminism: Spectacular Femininity and Transnational Culture  · by Rosemary Oyinlola Popoola  
    By: Raquel Acosta

  • Yar’adua Foundation Partners UNN To Open Sexual Harassment Portal
    An innovation at UNN to address issues of sexual harassment and assault, making it easier for vicitims to report. This pilot could help other institutions to develop similar programs.   https://independent.ng/yaradua-foundation-partners-unn-to-open-sexual-harassment-portal/    
    By: Amy Jamison
  • AAP logoAAP logo