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    AAP Supports Freshwater Research Through the African Women in Science Campaign
    The Alliance for African Partnership (AAP) is proud to support the African Women in Science campaign by the African Center for Aquatic Research and Education. Four women from various AAP member institutions have been selected to take part in the program, which aligns with AAP's goal of addressing the gap of African women in the sciences. The program seeks to enhance the participation of women scientists through the creation of a comprehensive, long-term, collaborative network of freshwater experts. The first component of the program is sending a group of promising students and early career researchers to the International Association for Great Lakes Research Conference in Winnipeg, Canada. Here, each participant will give oral presentations on their areas of research, attend networking events with academic, managerial, and policy experts from global freshwater community, and visit regional research facilities to further their exposure to research being done around the world. The four participants from AAP member institutions are:     Christine Nyagaya, Egerton University, MS Student, from Kenya, working on Lake Victoria  Christine Nyagaya Owino is a Kenyan, currently pursuing a master’s degree in Limnology at Egerton University Kenya and an undergraduate background in biotechnology. I am interested in biogeochemical processes in inland wetlands, their ecological and economic services and emissions of greenhouse gases from the wetlands. As a limnologist I am passionate about sustainable use of wetlands since I understand important ecological roles especially in acting as nutrient sinks and purifying water (buffer zones) that enters our lakes. I am also interested in sustainable use of inland lakes since these lakes are primary source of water to some people. One of my major goals is to contribute towards the achievement of sustainable development goals number 6 which is to (Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all” and numb er 13 on “Taking urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts   Madalitso Magombo Chatsika, LUANAR, PhD Student, from Malawi, working on Lake Malawi/Nyasa/Niassa  Mrs. Madalitso Magombo Chatsika an experienced and accomplished fisheries biologist for over 14 years. Currently, Madalitso is working as a lecturer in Fish Biology and Fisheries Management at the Lilongwe University of Agriculture and Natural resources (LUANAR), at the Department of Aquaculture and Fisheries Science where she is involved in teaching, research, consultancy and outreach. She is currently in her final year at Michigan State University (MSU), Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, studying towards attaining a PhD in Fisheries Biology and Management. As part of her PhD dissertation, Madalitso studied the “Effects of climate change on fisheries of the Southeast arm of Lake Malawi where she incorporated environmental variables like temperature and rainfall into the convectional Surplus Production Models to assess the impact of climate change on fisheries resources in Lake Malawi. Recently, Madalitso also conducted a study to assess the ecological impacts of climate change in capture fisheries: a case of Lake Chilwa in Zomba district, Malawi.Madalitso also conducted a research on the “Effect of seasonal variations and mesh sizes on the estimated length at 50% maturity of fish from Lake Kariba for her MSc degree at University of Bergen in Norway. She has also been involved in a WorldFish and World Vision project on “Developing creative approaches to fight HIV/AIDS in the fisheries sector in Malawi” in partnership with the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund. She has also been a team member for the CTA project on Technology Innovation System for the Fisheries and Aquaculture sub-sectors case study in Malawi.  As a fisheries scientist, Madalitso has a passion to contribute towards natural resource management (fisheries), food security and poverty reduction in Malawi through sustainable use of fisheries resources. She loves to see herself as a person who can provide solutions to the problems that are being faced by the fisheries sector in Malawi. Outside my career as a fisheries scientist, Madalitso is a wife and a mother of three boys. She comes from a lake district called Mangochi in Malawi (probably one of the reasons she got interested in fisheries). She likes cooking and travelling and her favorite travel destination is Japan. Her favorite sport is netball and she likes listening to traditional gospel music.   Dr. Lulu Kaaya, University of Dar es Salaam, Recent Graduate, from Tanzania, working on Lake Victoria Dr Lulu Kaaya is a Lecturer in Freshwater Ecology in the Department of Aquatic Sciences and Fisheries Technology at the University of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania where she teaches limnology and watershed management. She is also a lecturer of stream ecosystems concepts and streams integrity assessment in the International Joint Master’s degree in Limnology and Wetland Management Programme (Boku University-Austria, Egerton University-Kenya and UNESCO-IHE, The Netherlands).Dr Kaaya has been doing research in the rivers and lakes of Tanzania since 2005. Her research area cores around the ecological role and functions of freshwater ecosystems in the management of water resources.    She has been providing professional consultation on the integration of ecology into watershed management approaches in Tanzania i.e. Environmental Flow Assessments, River Health Assessments and establishment of integrated water resources management and development plans.  Her PhD thesis titled “Biological Assessment Of Tropical Riverine Systems Using Aquatic Macroinvertebrates In Tanzania, East Africa” provides a detailed analysis of  bioassessment from the regional perspective. She has published seven peer-reviewed articles based on freshwater ecosystems of Tanzania, supervised seven masters students in the area of aquatic sciences and conducted several outreach programmes on bioassessment.On a personal note, Dr Kaaya is a wife, mother of four, loves nature and sports (swimming and running), enjoys gardening and making new contacts. She is also a Rotarian.     Dr. Suzan Luyiga, Makerere University, Recent Graduate, from Uganda, working on Lake Victoria Suzan Luyiga is a Ugandan Limnologist associated with the Department of Zoology, Entomology and Fisheries Sciences of Makerere University, having over 15 years of freshwater ecological research and teaching experience. She has a PhD (Zoology-Limnology) of Makerere University, and a MSc. (Environmental Science and Technology - Limnology and Wetland Ecosystems) of UNESCO-IHE. As a professional limnologist, Suzan has conducted research on various aspects of freshwater environmental management, focusing on great lakes ecosystems particularly the anthropogenic impact on plankton communities, Environmental Impact Assessments and developing and optimizing integrated technologies to management of wastewater e.g. constructed wetlands and wastewater reuse for food production to prevent water pollution. She is passionate about freshwater environmental sustainability, and this has directed her to acquire skills including but not limited to: - Designing and implementing ESIA activities, Developing and implementing community awareness programs; Collecting information and developing of technical and training manuals; Teamwork building and management, and Networking with multi-disciplinary and inter-cultural groups.      
    By: Elaina Lawrence
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  • Fourth Global Teacher Education Summit Call for Papers
    The Faculty of Education of Beijing Normal University (BNU) is proud to announce that the Fourth Global Teacher Education Summit will be held in Beijing, the capital of the People’s Republic of China, during 23-26 October, 2020. The 2020 Summit is entitled “Policy, Research and Practice in Teacher Education and Teaching: Global perspectives”. With this announcement, we invite scholars, practitioners and students of education from all over the world to participate in the Summit, which promises to offer a feast of ideas and dialogues for the enhancement of teacher education and teaching in a global context. A dozen of key scholars in the fields of teacher education and teaching have been contacted to serve as keynote speakers of the Summit. The Fourth Global Teacher Education Summit is an international event that has been held every three years. Since 2011, when it was first convened by BNU’s Center for Teacher Education Research, a Key Research Base of Humanities and Social Science of the Ministry of Education, the Summit has produced scores of publications that were contributed by participating keynote and invited speakers and created a network of young scholars who have constituted the backbone of a new generation of inquiring minds for the fields.    Call for Papers: http://www.gtes2020.com/En/Menu/18">http://www.gtes2020.com/En/Menu/18 http://www.gtes2020.com/images/banner1.jpg" width="1302" height="467" />
    By: Amy Jamison
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  • Fourth Global Teacher Education Summit Conference Call for Papers
    The Faculty of Education of Beijing Normal University (BNU) is proud to announce that the Fourth Global Teacher Education Summit will be held in Beijing, the capital of the People’s Republic of China, during 23-26 October, 2020. The 2020 Summit is entitled “Policy, Research and Practice in Teacher Education and Teaching: Global perspectives”. With this announcement, we invite scholars, practitioners and students of education from all over the world to participate in the Summit, which promises to offer a feast of ideas and dialogues for the enhancement of teacher education and teaching in a global context. A dozen of key scholars in the fields of teacher education and teaching have been contacted to serve as keynote speakers of the Summit. The Fourth Global Teacher Education Summit is an international event that has been held every three years. Since 2011, when it was first convened by BNU’s Center for Teacher Education Research, a Key Research Base of Humanities and Social Science of the Ministry of Education, the Summit has produced scores of publications that were contributed by participating keynote and invited speakers and created a network of young scholars who have constituted the backbone of a new generation of inquiring minds for the fields.    Call for Papers: http://www.gtes2020.com/En/Menu/18">http://www.gtes2020.com/En/Menu/18 http://www.gtes2020.com/images/banner1.jpg" width="1302" height="467" />
    By: Amy Jamison
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  • ANNOUNCEMENT African Critical Inquiry Programme Workshop: Call for Applications
    ACIP Workshops are intended as annual occasions to identify and address critical themes, fundamental questions and pressing practical issues concerning public culture. For instance, Workshops might focus on particular notions and issues related to publics, visuality, museums and exhibitions, art, performance, representational or institutional forms from methodological, practical, and theoretical vantages. They might examine forms and practices of public scholarship and the theories, histories and systems of thought that shape and illuminate public culture and public scholarship. Workshops should encourage comparative, interdisciplinary and cross-institutional interchange and reflection that brings into conversation public scholarship in Africa, creative cultural production, and critical theory. Workshop budgets will vary depending on proposed plans; the maximum award is ZAR 60,000.   https://africanstudies.org/asa-news/january-2015-asa-news/african-critical-inquiry-programme-workshop-call-for-applications/">https://africanstudies.org/asa-news/january-2015-asa-news/african-critical-inquiry-programme-workshop-call-for-applications/ 
    By: Amy Jamison
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  • CJAS: Call for Reviewers
    The Contemporary Journal of African Studies, published and managed by the Institute of African Studies at the University of Ghana, Legon, seeks reviewers for the following fields:   Anthropology Art History Communication Studies Health History International Relations Linguistics Literature Music Philosophy Political Science Popular Culture Psychology Sociology Urban Planning Women’s Studies   The Contemporary Journal of African Studies (CJAS) began its life as the Research Review in 1969 and was re-branded as the CJAS in 2012.  CJAS is a peer-reviewed scholarly journal published twice a year. The Editorial Committee welcomes scholarly articles that set forth the findings of new research in any branch of African Studies, or papers that discuss and re-evaluate earlier research by others, or a combination of these approaches.http://ias.ug.edu.gh/content/contemporary-journal-african-studies-cjas">Contemporary Journal of African Studies (CJAS) Please visit our website to learn more about the journal. If you are interested in reviewing for the journal, please contact: cjasmanager@ug.edu.gh.
    By: Amy Jamison
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  • Peacebuilding through peace education and the arts in Mali
    In September of 2016, the Alliance for African Partnership (AAP) issued an open call for research proposals that target the AAP’s thematic areas of agri-food systems; water, energy and the environment; youth empowerment; education; culture; and health and nutrition. After receiving over sixty-five proposals, fifteen proposals were chosen to be awarded between $50,000-$200,000 towards their projects that would create long-term and sustainable collaborations between MSU faculty and partners from African organizations.   Now, three years of diligence and passion later, these research teams have finished their research. To celebrate and share this collaboration, effecting positive change in Africa through meaningful and equitable partnerships, we are highlighting a success story from one of the teams and their project, “Countering Violent Extremism in Mali: Critical Reasoning, Moral Character, and Democratic Resilience through Peace Education”.   This research project was led by MSU’s Dean of the Residential College in the Arts (RCAH) and Humanities, Stephen L. Esquith, and Maria Diarra, the director of l’Institut pour l'Education Populaire, a school in Kati, Mali. With help from Professor Macki Samake of Universite des Lettres et des Sciences Humaines, a university in Bamako, Mali, this team of researchers spent their time working on three deliverables to promote peace education in Mali.   The first of these deliverables was a new and refined version of The Mali Peace Game, a political simulation that was created for peace education in 2015. The new updated version of the game was tailored to a wider range of students, seeing as the original version was developed for middle school students. With the updated game, Esquith, Diarra and Samake have integrated it into the basic curriculum in Mali (specifically language arts, history, social science, and visual and performing arts).    The second deliverable that came out of this research project is the creation of a new picture book, Ben Sigili/Faire la Paix (Make Peace). Made by teachers and students, the book has a special focus on conflicts between displaced persons and other property owners. Copies of the book were distributed to all students at l’Ecole Ciwara, a K-9 school, to be used in their classrooms as texts for reading in French, Bamanankan, and English and as prompts for skits and role-playing exercises. Through the MSU Scientific Animations without Borders, they were also able to create a video animation of Ben SIgili/Faire la Paix, which has enabled them to train more teachers and leaders in other regions of the country.    The third and last component of the research project was the hosting of local dialogue forums where students, teachers, and invited community members discussed the issues raised by the short presentations from the Mali Peace Game and scenes from the picture books.   With combined expertise from RCAH at MSU and ULSHB in Mali, help from local K-12 Malian educators, and funding from AAP’s strategic partnership grant program, this research team was able to apply active learning techniques in the arts and humanities to the study of conflict, conflict resolution, and conflict transformation, as well as introduce new digital technology to the production and distribution of new peace education materials in order to create a wider peacebuilding network. Not only was the research team able to accomplish their goal of distributing hardcopy and digital materials to the local community in Kati, but they were able to train new leaders and peace educators and spread their efforts beyond Kati. Many of the teachers who helped create these materials have gone on to work in other non-governmental organizations where they have introduced these peace education tools and techniques in other regions of Mali.   Since completing their research and peace education efforts, Esquith and Diarra’s team has held three workshops in Mali with representatives l’Ecole de Maintien de la Paix in Bamako, the International Sports Alliance in Mali, Right to Play in Mali, the Ecole Ciwara in Kati, RCAH, and the Universite des Lettres et des Sciences Humaines. They have also found further funding to continue their work and continue shaping the lives of youth in Mali.
    By: Justin Rabineau
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  • Bringing Insects Back as Food and Feed in Sub-Sarahan Africa
    In September of 2016, the AAP issued an open call for research proposals that target the AAP’s thematic areas of agri-food systems; water, energy and the environment; youth empowerment; education; culture; and health and nutrition. After receiving over sixty-five proposals, fifteen proposals were chosen to be awarded between $50,000-$200,000 towards their projects that would create long-term and sustainable collaborations between MSU faculty and partners from African organizations.   Now, three years of diligence and passion later, these research teams have finished their research. To celebrate and share this collaboration, effecting positive change in Africa through meaningful and equitable partnerships, here is a success story from one of the teams and their project, “Farming Insects for Food: Developing Partnerships for Sustainable Food Security in Malawi”.   Led by associate professor, M. Eric Benbow and assistant professor, Jennifer L. Pechal of MSU’s Agriculture and Natural Resources, the team addressed the food insecurity in East Africa due to uncertainty in local crop availability. With a long-term goal of developing and assessing the use and safety of insects as a widely available, sustainable feed for livestock production, the team focused on the following three objectives: Developing partnerships and build a network of collaborators between African and US institutions and individuals for technical training and capacity building.  Assess the feasibility, benefits, and optimization of insects as feed for local stakeholders while educating local students and stakeholders. Secure external funding to promote research and enhance the livelihood for individuals that would implement these techniques of using insects.  Benbow and Pechal collaborated with several faculty from Lilongwe University of Agriculture and Natural Resources (LUANAR) in Lilongwe, Malawi. Through this partnership, they looked at how larvae of certain insects can be used as feed for livestock and help increase agricultural sustainability, improve feed security and can be easily introduced into local food production chains. With meaningful conversations at the city council and private industry levels, a better understanding of the costs, impacts, and challenges of developing a continuous source of insects as protein in Malawi, and the opportunity to meet the assistant deputy head of the Lilongwe City Council Solid Waste Disposal Sites to identify potential waste streams available as a resource for black soldier fly development, the team was able to reach the stages of their research where they are discussing logistics, capacity, partnerships, and data acquisition with a consortium of insects-as-feed in the USA (i.e., Evoconversion Systems) and a private South African based company.   After 18 months of efforts funded by the AAP to get more global support for this initiative to develop a commercial black soldier fly (BSF) operation in Malawi to increase sustainable feed for livestock production and minimize the risk of malnutrition in rural communities, Benbow and Pechal have established strong partnerships with people and businesses looking to help them continue this project which will undoubtedly improve the agricultural and economic reality of Malawi.
    By: Justin Rabineau
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  • ARUA meeting in Nairobi
    https://www.universityworldnews.com/post.php?story=20191130044914804">ARUA Annual Conference in Nairobi
    By: Amy Jamison
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