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    Please join us this Tuesday 15th March 2022 at 4pm EAT, 8am EST as we launch our new project on Diversity and Inclusion in leadership and training.
    By: Raymond Musiima
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    Women in Leadership in Higher Education: Global and Regional Perspectives Webinar
    Gender sensitive institutional structures and policies. Using Evidence and data to #BreakTheBiasEducation Sub Saharan Africa (ESSA), European Women Rectors Association (EWORA) and the International Association of Universities (IAU) have come together for International Women Day 2022 to launch a global conversation on women in leadership in education, with a special focus on Europe and Africa. The focus of this initial conversation is gender-sensitive institutional structures and policies.During the webinar, evidence and data from research will be shared, including findings from the ESSA The State of Women Leading Report, the European She figures 2021 - Statistics on Gender in Research and Innovation by EWORA and information from the IAU World Higher Education Database (WHED).University leaders and organisations from Europe and Africa will present gender equality issues in higher education and research. This webinar will set the scene for a panel discussion on gender-sensitive institutional structures and policies to support female leadership development in education.   To register: https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/2116457046730/WN_8ZGkWOc6QsauclNkXXfZAQ
    By: Raquel Acosta
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  • Gender equality in 2022: How global universities are performing
    THE, in partnership with UNESCO IESALC (the International Institute for Higher Education in Latin America and the Caribbean) invite you to join five experts from five regions of the world to share how their universities are beacons of excellence in driving progress towards gender equality.On International Women’s Day, THE and UNESCO-IESALC will publish a new White Paper presenting a global analysis of exclusive data across 18 indicators, and five detailed case-studies that will help you support your own institution’s efforts to tackle gender inequality and discrimination.We will reveal regional examples which are making outstanding progress, and the possible factors and strategies behind their success.Gain access to the new research that is designed to guide strategic decision making towards promoting SDG5.We will explore:• Which regions are working towards greater equality when it comes to the average shares of female students across different subject areas• How universities are becoming more focused on improving women’s access to higher education than improving their outcomes and success rates• In which areas are women underrepresented within the university staff and academics.• What is a new emerging frontier in the fight for gender equality?Speakers:• Erika Adriana Loyo Beristáin, Head of the Gender Equality Unit, University of Guadalajara• Emma Deraze, sr data scientist, THE• Eileen Drew, director, Centre for Gender Equality and Leadership, Trinity College Dublin• Rosa Ellis, rankings reporter, THE• Victoria Galán-Muros, chief of research and analysis, UNESCO-IESALC• Kathryn Maud, assistant professor of women and gender studies, American University of Beirut• Bhavani Rao, director, Ammachi Labs and Unesco chair in gender equality and women’s empowerment, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham• Judith Waudo, director of the Center for Gender Equity and Empowerment, Kenyatta University   To register: https://timeshighereducation.zoom.us/webinar/register/6016439759437/WN_dT2C5wYDTWOojK8RoUzhkg?mc_cid=5d6cfd5ca7&mc_eid=7136de6cb6
    By: Raquel Acosta
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    TWAS – Women in Climate Action research grants
    To support action-based projects with a direct impact on society, the Elsevier Foundation is partnering with TWAS – the World Academy of Sciences to provide research grants for projects led by women scientists that address concrete problems in climate change through collaboration and interdisciplinary research.   The program is community-focused: a competitive, open call for applications will consider projects that respond to the needs of, and to the development requirements, of the applicants’ community and/or national or regional context in one of the 66 scientifically and technologically lagging country (STLCs). The TWAS-Elsevier Foundation Project Grants Programme for Gender Equity and Climate Action aims to: • Promote gender equality by creating opportunities for women in climate action projects that take them outside the lab, enabling them to deepen their scientific skills, while acquiring, through training, soft skills such as project management and leadership. • Respond to and tackle communities’ needs in ways that are in line with the principles of sustainable development, focusing on the brunt of climatic changes. • Effectively transfer knowledge from scientific research to real-life scenarios for practical and tangible change under the umbrella of the “climate action” SDG. Knowledge deriving from scientific research often suffers from not being applicable to real-life scenarios, especially in the Global South – slowing down tangible improvements. Greater progress in the livelihoods of individuals are achieved when research is done in cooperation with local populations, and when scientific know-how is effectively shared by those living in the same communities. UN Women reports that globally, one fourth of all economically active women are engaged in agriculture, where they regularly contend with climate consequences such as crop failure and experience an unequal burden of care for collecting increasingly scarce water and fuel.   The grants will support women researchers from the Global South to reinforce both scientific and soft skills such as project management, leadership and science diplomacy – with the aim of sustainably improving the livelihood of their entire community by supporting women’s wellbeing.   To learn more: https://elsevierfoundation.org/partnerships/inclusive-research/twas-women-climate-action-research/
    By: Raquel Acosta
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    A Turn to the African Girl: (Re)Defining African Girlhood Studies
    Over the last century, girls, long ignored as sources of knowledge, have engaged in activism and creative endeavors to express their visions and aspirations for a future society inclusive of their needs. In the last decade a flourishing of girls’ creative agency and incisive voices has given rise to growing and vibrant scholarship on girlhoods and their politics, histories, economics, arts, and cultures. The establishment of Girlhood Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal in 2008 encouraged scholars to take girls’ lived experiences more seriously.   Girlhood studies provides a critical means to counter the historical tendency of feminist scholarship to center adult women and marginalize or even ignore girls. While recent scholarship has shifted from focusing on girls as largely vulnerable and in need of protection, most of the research has been about girlhood in the Global North. Notable exceptions include studies that highlight the resilience and agency of African girls (Moletsane et al. 2021; Mitchell and Moletsane 2018). Additionally, research on girlhoods by Corrie Decker (2010), Abosede George (2014), Sadiyya Haffejee et al. (2020), Jen Katshunga (2019), and Heather Switzer (2018) reflects a range of approaches that move beyond the focus on precarity in Africa. Ensuring that girls are seen to be knowers and narrators of their own stories is essential. In this issue we aim to bring together a diverse group of scholars in contributions that will analyze critically and present creatively the experiences and agency of girls and young women in Africa and its diasporas.           The focus here will be on the voices of girls in Africa and, more specifically, on how girls as active agents inform our understandings of girlhood and how colonial and post-colonial interventions have shaped and re-defined African girlhood through pseudo-scientific developmental models that were introduced to the continent via missionary education systems that have continued, largely, to operate in the twenty-first century. While contributions might examine how African girls negotiate cultural, gendered, racialized, and/or sexualized identities shaped by underlying issues of African self-determination, genocide, slavery, migration policies, violence, and colonialism we seek contributions that center girls’ perspectives, resistance, resilience, and innovation even in the midst of precarity and vulnerability. By turning questions about empowerment away from how we empower girls to those about how societies, institutions, and families can support the ways in which girls have empowered themselves and address the ways in which they have been ignored, we can better understand and deal with issues related to African girls in the twenty-first century.               Contributors to this special issue could address the need to theorize girlhoods across the vast geographies of Africa and problematize how these have been constructed and deployed as the justification for development interventions and anti-poverty alleviation programs. We are particularly interested in analyses engaging different feminisms and Afro-Indigenous studies as well as queer and trans studies, theories, and methods. Authors are invited to examine embodied, political, and conceptual artifacts produced by girls and young women living in Africa. Comparative studies are welcome as are individual case studies that highlight historical and locationally specific processes and events. We welcome contributions authored by young people who identify as girls. The following questions, among others, may be addressed. How can we problematize the very category of girl as a deeply colonial heteropatriarchal    construct? How do colonial politics of deservedness and biopolitics function to position African girls as targets of state violence? What influence have African girls had on policy or programs and to what extent have they been mere targets and objects of such policies and programs? Which methodologies enable or enhance girls’ participation in research and community (or institutional) development? What kinds of adaptive regimes, practices, and policies do African states deploy and how do these have an impact on girls’ bio-autonomy and shape their relationships with issues of subject formation, nationhood, violence, justice, and solidarity? What does disrupting the white, able, heteronormative categories of girlhood mean for analyses of girlhood and for queer, trans, and gender-fluid lives? What creative, grassroots, decolonizing, resurgent strategies have young women living in African countries taken up and with what outcomes Guest Editors This special issue is to be edited by Catherine Cymone Fourshey, Marla Jaksch, and Relebohile Moletsane. Please direct enquiries to africangirlhoods@gmail.com   Catherine Cymone Fourshey is an Associate Professor in History and International Relations at Bucknell University. Marla Jaksch is Professor and Barbara Meyers Pelson Chair in Faculty-Student Engagement/ Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at The College of New Jersey Relebohile Moletsane is Professor and John Langalibalele Dube Chair in Rural Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal.   Article Submission Abstracts are due by 15 March 2022 and should be sent to africangirlhoods@gmail.com Full manuscripts are due by 15 July 2022. Authors should provide a cover page giving brief biographical details (up to 100 words), institutional affiliation(s) and full contact information, including an email address. Articles may be no longer than 6,500 words including the abstract (up to 125 words), keywords (6 to 8 in alphabetical order with no duplication of words from the title), notes, captions, tables, and acknowledgements (if any), biographical details (taken from the cover page), and references. Images in a text count for 200 words each. Girlhood Studies, following Berghahn’s preferred house style, uses a modified Chicago Style. See http://journals.berghahnbooks.com/_uploads/ghs/girlhood-studies_style_guide.pdf If images are used, authors are expected to secure the copyright themselves and they are expected to follow IRB protocols and ethical research standards regarding girls and young women as subjects.   References Decker, Corrie 2010. “Reading, Writing, and Respectability: How Schoolgirls Developed Modern Literacies in Colonial Zanzibar.” International Journal of African Historical Studies 43(1): 89–114. George, Abosede A. 2014. Making Modern Girls: A History of Girlhood, Labor, and Social Development in Colonial Lagos. Athens, OH: Ohio University Press. Haffejee, Sadiyya, Astrid Treffry-Goatley, Lisa Wiebesiek, and Nkonzo Mkhize. 2020. “Negotiating Girl-led Advocacy: Addressing Early and Forced Marriage in South Africa.” Girlhood Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal 13 (2): 18–34. Kashunga, Jen. 2019. “Contesting Black Girlhood(s) beyond Northern Borders: Exploring a Black African Girl Approach.” In The Black Girlhood Studies Collection, ed. Aria S. Halliday, 45–79. Toronto, CA.: Women’s Press. Mitchell, Claudia, and Relebohile Moletsane 2018. Disrupting Shameful Legacies: Girls and Young Women Speak Back through the Arts to Address Sexual Violence. Leiden, NL: Brill Sense. Moletsane, Relebohile, Lisa Wiebesiek, Astrid Treffry-Goatley, and April Mandrona 2021. Ethical Practice in Participatory Visual Research with Girls: Transnational Approaches. New York, NY: Berghahn Books. Switzer, Heather D. 2018. When the Light is Fire: Maasai Schoolgirls in Contemporary Kenya. Champaign, IL: University of Illinois Press. Contact Info:  Catherine Cymone Fourshey is an Associate Professor in History and International Relations at Bucknell University. Marla Jaksch is Professor and Barbara Meyers Pelson Chair in Faculty-Student Engagement/ Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at The College of New Jersey Relebohile Moletsane is Professor and John Langalibalele Dube Chair in Rural Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal. Contact Email:  africangirlhoods@gmail.com URL:  https://journals.berghahnbooks.com/_uploads/ghs/GHS_cfp_AfricanGHS.pdf
    By: Raquel Acosta
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  • East African Regionalism in Uncertain Times: Historical Legacies, Contemporary Challenges
    Since its re-establishment in 2000, the East African Community’s (EAC) integration and cooperation agenda has made significant strides over the previous two decades. However, in recent years, this progress has come up against a series of political challenges including a fragmented response to the Covid-19 pandemic, tensions between national governments, border closures, the endurance of non-tariff barriers and rising economic protectionism. Although some have drawn parallels between these trends and those that led to the collapse of the first EAC in 1977, there are reasons to not be overly fatalistic about the future prospects of regional integration East Africa. For one thing, intra-EAC trade has grown significantly over the last twenty years, creating economic linkages across the region and an imperative to retain (if not strengthen) the regional integration process. Moreover, while the ‘high-politics’ of the EAC has recently been defined by division, it is important not to lose sight of the fact that the ideals of regional cooperation continue to endure outside of official summits and directives. This conference aims to bring together academics, policymakers and stakeholders to take stock of the opportunities and enduring challenges facing the contemporary EAC integration agenda. In doing so, the conference will aim to take stock of the historical legacies of regional integration in East Africa, examining how the idea and practice of regionalism has evolved over time. It will also bring together experts and practitioners to offer insights into the future prospects and trajectory of the EAC. We are inviting paper abstracts for this conference in themes such as: The history of regionalism in East Africa – what are the continuities and changes between different periods of regional integration? The ideologies and ideas that sustain the East African regional integration project Cultural expressions of East African identity Regionalism and development in East Africa Participatory regionalism in East Africa – to what extent is the EAC’s regional integration agenda ‘people-centred’ and ‘private-sector’ driven? The EAC and continental integration initiatives (i.e. AfCFTA) Comparative regionalism – how does East African integration compare to other integration projects in Africa and across the world? The deadline to submit abstracts of up to 250 words is the 1st April 2022. The conference will be hosted by the British Institute in Eastern Africa (BIEA) in Nairobi, Kenya. It is hoped that the event will run in a hybrid format that will allow participants to attend either in person, at the BIEA, or online. Please note, however, due to potential disruption from Covid-19, the event may have to be moved to an online only format. Abstracts and general queries should be sent to: east.african.regionalism2022@gmail.com Contact Info:  Dr. Chris Vaughan and Dr. Peter O'Reilly School of Humanites and Social Sciences Liverpool John Moores University Contact Email:  east.african.regionalism2022@gmail.com
    By: Raquel Acosta
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    CFP: Fractured Skies: Civil Aviation and the Global South
    Airplanes and civil aviation have played a central role in the economics, politics, and cultures of the twentieth century. They have been crucial in both twentieth century nationalism and internationalism, and in the politics of independent nation-state building and the construction of colonial empires. Aeromobility and airmindedness have been essential for shaping a vivid, material imagination of a globally connected world, and the development of civil aviation has emerged as a key goal of states, rich and poor.    Histories of civil aviation have traditionally followed internist contours, with a focus on the history of airline development or linear approaches to technical innovations and progress. In recent years however new historiographical and methodological approaches have opened up new vistas by bringing in broader geographical, cultural, political, economic, and social currents.    This workshop seeks to bring together these new perspectives to explore aviation in relation to the Global South. It looks to bring these new historiographical and methodological currents in the history of aviation into conversation with developments in other fields of history and further afield in the social sciences and humanities.We invite historians, sociologists, anthropologists, political scientists, geographers, and scholars from other interested disciplines to reflect on all aspects of civil aviation, aerial mobility, and aerial infrastructure in the Global South, including but not limited to airlines, airports, air routes, agreements and other legislation, navigation, maintenance and repair, aircraft, staff, and labour. We invite scholars who can explore the intersections of civil aviation with military aviation and other aspects of state action and governance at regional, national, and international levels through micro and macro case-studies and other interventions. This would include the role of civil aviation, aeromobility and flying sovereignty in shaping international relations, and colonial and postcolonial political, social and economic development. We welcome connections with recent literatures on race, gender, mobility, space and spatiality, infrastructures, governance and governmentality, imperialism, capitalism, international relations, security studies, and science and technology studies. The workshop is hosted jointly by Waqar Zaidi (Lahore University of Management and Sciences) and Marie Huber (Humboldt Universität zu Berlin), and will take place online, 28 - 30 June 2022. In order to foster debate and discussion during the workshop, we will request participants to submit short-form papers a few weeks in advance.  Please send a short abstract (c. 250 words) and a short CV / bionote (1 to 2 pages, in a single pdf), until March 25, to:   Dr. Marie Huber (marie.huber@hu-berlin.de),Department of History,Humboldt Universität zu Berlin, Germany AND Dr. Waqar Zaidi (waqar.zaidi@lums.edu.pk),Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,Lahore University of Management Sciences,Pakistan     Contact Info:  Dr. Marie Huber (marie.huber@hu-berlin.de),Department of History,Humboldt Universität zu Berlin, Germany AND Dr. Waqar Zaidi (waqar.zaidi@lums.edu.pk),Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,Lahore University of Management Sciences,Pakistan   Contact Email:  marie.huber@hu-berlin.de
    By: Raquel Acosta
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  • UAAC-AAUC Call for Sessions
    We invite the submission of session proposals for the annual Universities Art Association of Canada | Association d'art des universités du Canada. We hope to offer a range of panels, roundtables, and workshops that reflect UAACʼs diverse constituents, in terms of membership and scholarship. Panels, roundtables, and workshops are invited that interrogate all time periods and cultural frames of art history, visual and material culture, creative studio practice, design practice, theory and criticism, pedagogy, and museum and gallery practice.We particularly welcome sessions that focus on areas that have not been strongly represented at previous UAAC conferences, such as Indigenous scholarship and practices, scholars, artists/theorists dealing with race(ism), immigration, diaspora. We also encourage sessions that focus on Pre- and Early-Modern studies, and more broadly, sessions that address global or transnational topics and approaches from all time periods.Proposals (which can be in English or French) should include a title, a 150-word description of the panel, and full contact information for the session chair/s. The bulk of the conference is expected to be held in person, but a limited number of virtual panel slots are available. Please indicate in the Google Form whether you are proposing an in-person or virtual panel.Only members of UAAC-AAUC may chair or co-chair and/or present papers in conference sessions. Non-members who propose sessions will be required to become members in the event that their proposals are accepted.We welcome proposals from permanent and contract academic staff, independent scholars, artists and curators, and graduate students in terminal degree programs. Sessions that include a mixture of graduate students and faculty/independent researchers are also encouraged. Please note that only ONE proposal will be accepted per member, whether that proposal is for a single or jointly chaired session, roundtable, or workshop.How to submit a proposal:Please fill out the Google Form here: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdNtD4-KvQHSBFniDjy9aRmO_agni_IEo2BGlHYr1OY6eERIA/viewformDeadline: March 27, 2022.For more information on membership: https://uaac-aauc.com/ 
    By: Raquel Acosta
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    U.S. Mission in Uganda Public Affairs Annual Program Statement
    The U.S. Mission in Uganda’s Public Affairs Office is pleased to announce that funding is available through the Public Diplomacy Grant Program for projects ranging in value from $5,000 to $40,000. Projects for greater values will be considered on a case-by-case basis.    Grants are intended for committed and organized civil-society organizations, local representatives of civil society, think tanks, non-governmental organizations, cultural institutions, and academic institutions. Awards to individuals will also be considered on a case-by-case basis. All grantees must have a non-profit status.    Notice: For Fiscal Year 2022 all proposals submitted in response to this Annual Program Statement must include a contingency plan describing how the proposed activity would be implemented in the event that COVID-19 related health restrictions are in place during the anticipated period of performance.    Objectives and Project Outcomes:  The objectives of the Public Diplomacy Grant Program are to promote positive relations between the people of Uganda and the United States; reinforce shared values; and connect high potential Ugandan youth and young professionals (aged 16 to 35) as well as established professional leaders to the American people through projects that:  Help Ugandan youth aged 16 – 35, especially young women, explore and discover their potential through innovative science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) programs, as well as entrepreneurship programs.  Encourage Ugandan youth aged 16 – 35 to participate in civic life through social entrepreneurship, volunteerism, and community engagement.  Strengthen understanding of U.S. values and institutions; highlight U.S. culture, including American Studies; and support diversity, inclusion, and equality.  Utilize the power of the arts to promote positive self-expression, social change, and economic opportunity among Ugandan youth aged 16 – 35.  Equip emerging community leaders (e.g., sports coaches, arts instructors, and cultural professionals) aged 22 – 35 with the skills and knowledge necessary to grow their organizations or to enhance their engagement with youth audiences.  Promote the development and application of new technologies and innovative solutions to economic, environmental, and social challenges. Projects could connect U.S. technology or public policy experts with Ugandan peers or foster the application of American technology and innovations to address challenges in Ugandan communities.  Support civil society organizations (CSOs) in developing a vibrant and prosperous democratic society through programs that strengthen NGO management, enhance the skills of early to mid-career NGO/CSO professionals, strengthen networks between NGO/CSO professionals in the United States and Uganda, or demonstrate to the public the positive role CSOs play in advancing a prosperous, healthy, and informed society.    To learn more: https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=336894
    By: Raquel Acosta
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    DRL FY2021: Global Equality Fund LGBTQI+ Programs in Africa
    The U.S. Department of State, Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor (DRL) invites civil society organizations (CSOs) to submit applications for projects that provide lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and intersex (LGBTQI+) communities with the tools to empower local movements and communities, prevent, mitigate, and recover from violence, discrimination, stigma, and human rights abuses, promote full social inclusion, or address critical issues of justice.  Projects should be focused on one or more of the following regions: West Africa, Central Africa, the Middle East and North Africa, South and Central Asia, and East Asia. We intend for projects to be led by, or have strong support from and participation by, LGBTQI+ organizations and communities.   Successful proposals will be funded by the resources of the Global Equality Fund, a public-private partnership including the governments of Argentina, Australia, Canada, Chile, Croatia, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Iceland, Italy, Montenegro, the Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, Uruguay and the United States, as well as the Arcus Foundation, the John D. Evans Foundation, FRI: the Norwegian Organization for Sexual and Gender Diversity, the M·A·C AIDS Fund, Deloitte LLP, the Royal Bank of Canada, Hilton, Bloomberg LP, Thomson Reuters Foundation TrustLaw Initiative, Human Rights Campaign, and Out Leadership.   The overall goal of these funds is to advance the human rights of persons who face discrimination, violence, or abuse on account of their real or perceived sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, or sex characteristics in West Africa, Central Africa, Middle East and North Africa, South and Central Asia, and East Asia.  DRL will consider proposals for regional or single country programs.  Regional programming should be conducted in multiple target countries, as it is appropriate and safe to do so.   To learn more: https://www.state.gov/drl-fy2021-global-equality-fund-lgbtqi-programs-in-west-africa-central-africa-the-middle-east-and-north-africa-south-and-central-asia-and-east-asia/ https://www.state.gov/drl-fy2021-global-equality-fund-lgbtqi-programs-in-west-africa-central-africa-the-middle-east-and-north-africa-south-and-central-asia-and-east-asia/
    By: Raquel Acosta
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  • Fifteenth Annual ASMEA Conference Call for Papers and Panels
    Scholars from any discipline, tenured or non-tenured faculty, or those otherwise affiliated with a recognized research institution, may submit proposals to present at the Fifteenth Annual ASMEA Conference. Unique proposals from senior graduate students (ABD) also are welcome. Proposals on topics related to the Middle East and Africa should consist of a one-page summary of new and unpublished research. A recent C.V. with all contact data also must be included with name, e-mail, phone number, and affiliation.   To submit a panel proposal for the Fifteenth Annual ASMEA Conference, the organizer of this panel will need to include three to four presenters as well as a discussant/moderator along with the following information for each participant: Paper title Presenter name and institution One-page proposal of the paper topic C.V. or resume the deadline to submit is May 1, 2022. The panel organizer is the point of contact and in charge of submitting all materials. Questions can be directed to Suzanne Sloan at sgk@asmeascholars.org.   To submit paper/panel proposals: Call for Papers (asmeascholars.org)
    By: Raquel Acosta
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  • ASMEA Travel and Research Grant Opportunities
    The Association for the Study of the Middle East and Africa (ASMEA) is offering two grant opportunities in conjunction with its Fifteenth Annual Conference taking place in Washington, D.C. on November 5 - 7, 2022.   The ASMEA Research Grant Program seeks to support research on topics in Middle Eastern and African studies that deserve greater attention. Applicants may submit paper proposals on any topic as long as it constitutes new and original research and is relevant to the five qualifying topic areas: Minorities and Women, Military History, Governance and Economy, Faith, and Iran. Grants of up to $2500 will be awarded. Successful research grant applicants are required to present their research at the Fifteenth Annual ASMEA Conference. The deadline to apply is April 15, 2022.Separately, ASMEA is offering Travel Grants of up to $750 which can be used towards the costs associated with attending the  Annual ASMEA Conference in Washington, D.C. The deadline to apply is April 15, 2022.   Additional guidelines and information can be found on our website at www.asmeascholars.org. Feel free to contact ASMEA at info@asmeascholars.org with any questions.
    By: Raquel Acosta
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