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    TWAS – Women in Climate Action research grants
    To support action-based projects with a direct impact on society, the Elsevier Foundation is partnering with TWAS – the World Academy of Sciences to provide research grants for projects led by women scientists that address concrete problems in climate change through collaboration and interdisciplinary research.   The program is community-focused: a competitive, open call for applications will consider projects that respond to the needs of, and to the development requirements, of the applicants’ community and/or national or regional context in one of the 66 scientifically and technologically lagging country (STLCs). The TWAS-Elsevier Foundation Project Grants Programme for Gender Equity and Climate Action aims to: • Promote gender equality by creating opportunities for women in climate action projects that take them outside the lab, enabling them to deepen their scientific skills, while acquiring, through training, soft skills such as project management and leadership. • Respond to and tackle communities’ needs in ways that are in line with the principles of sustainable development, focusing on the brunt of climatic changes. • Effectively transfer knowledge from scientific research to real-life scenarios for practical and tangible change under the umbrella of the “climate action” SDG. Knowledge deriving from scientific research often suffers from not being applicable to real-life scenarios, especially in the Global South – slowing down tangible improvements. Greater progress in the livelihoods of individuals are achieved when research is done in cooperation with local populations, and when scientific know-how is effectively shared by those living in the same communities. UN Women reports that globally, one fourth of all economically active women are engaged in agriculture, where they regularly contend with climate consequences such as crop failure and experience an unequal burden of care for collecting increasingly scarce water and fuel.   The grants will support women researchers from the Global South to reinforce both scientific and soft skills such as project management, leadership and science diplomacy – with the aim of sustainably improving the livelihood of their entire community by supporting women’s wellbeing.   To learn more: https://elsevierfoundation.org/partnerships/inclusive-research/twas-women-climate-action-research/
    By: Raquel Acosta
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    A Turn to the African Girl: (Re)Defining African Girlhood Studies
    Over the last century, girls, long ignored as sources of knowledge, have engaged in activism and creative endeavors to express their visions and aspirations for a future society inclusive of their needs. In the last decade a flourishing of girls’ creative agency and incisive voices has given rise to growing and vibrant scholarship on girlhoods and their politics, histories, economics, arts, and cultures. The establishment of Girlhood Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal in 2008 encouraged scholars to take girls’ lived experiences more seriously.   Girlhood studies provides a critical means to counter the historical tendency of feminist scholarship to center adult women and marginalize or even ignore girls. While recent scholarship has shifted from focusing on girls as largely vulnerable and in need of protection, most of the research has been about girlhood in the Global North. Notable exceptions include studies that highlight the resilience and agency of African girls (Moletsane et al. 2021; Mitchell and Moletsane 2018). Additionally, research on girlhoods by Corrie Decker (2010), Abosede George (2014), Sadiyya Haffejee et al. (2020), Jen Katshunga (2019), and Heather Switzer (2018) reflects a range of approaches that move beyond the focus on precarity in Africa. Ensuring that girls are seen to be knowers and narrators of their own stories is essential. In this issue we aim to bring together a diverse group of scholars in contributions that will analyze critically and present creatively the experiences and agency of girls and young women in Africa and its diasporas.           The focus here will be on the voices of girls in Africa and, more specifically, on how girls as active agents inform our understandings of girlhood and how colonial and post-colonial interventions have shaped and re-defined African girlhood through pseudo-scientific developmental models that were introduced to the continent via missionary education systems that have continued, largely, to operate in the twenty-first century. While contributions might examine how African girls negotiate cultural, gendered, racialized, and/or sexualized identities shaped by underlying issues of African self-determination, genocide, slavery, migration policies, violence, and colonialism we seek contributions that center girls’ perspectives, resistance, resilience, and innovation even in the midst of precarity and vulnerability. By turning questions about empowerment away from how we empower girls to those about how societies, institutions, and families can support the ways in which girls have empowered themselves and address the ways in which they have been ignored, we can better understand and deal with issues related to African girls in the twenty-first century.               Contributors to this special issue could address the need to theorize girlhoods across the vast geographies of Africa and problematize how these have been constructed and deployed as the justification for development interventions and anti-poverty alleviation programs. We are particularly interested in analyses engaging different feminisms and Afro-Indigenous studies as well as queer and trans studies, theories, and methods. Authors are invited to examine embodied, political, and conceptual artifacts produced by girls and young women living in Africa. Comparative studies are welcome as are individual case studies that highlight historical and locationally specific processes and events. We welcome contributions authored by young people who identify as girls. The following questions, among others, may be addressed. How can we problematize the very category of girl as a deeply colonial heteropatriarchal    construct? How do colonial politics of deservedness and biopolitics function to position African girls as targets of state violence? What influence have African girls had on policy or programs and to what extent have they been mere targets and objects of such policies and programs? Which methodologies enable or enhance girls’ participation in research and community (or institutional) development? What kinds of adaptive regimes, practices, and policies do African states deploy and how do these have an impact on girls’ bio-autonomy and shape their relationships with issues of subject formation, nationhood, violence, justice, and solidarity? What does disrupting the white, able, heteronormative categories of girlhood mean for analyses of girlhood and for queer, trans, and gender-fluid lives? What creative, grassroots, decolonizing, resurgent strategies have young women living in African countries taken up and with what outcomes Guest Editors This special issue is to be edited by Catherine Cymone Fourshey, Marla Jaksch, and Relebohile Moletsane. Please direct enquiries to africangirlhoods@gmail.com   Catherine Cymone Fourshey is an Associate Professor in History and International Relations at Bucknell University. Marla Jaksch is Professor and Barbara Meyers Pelson Chair in Faculty-Student Engagement/ Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at The College of New Jersey Relebohile Moletsane is Professor and John Langalibalele Dube Chair in Rural Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal.   Article Submission Abstracts are due by 15 March 2022 and should be sent to africangirlhoods@gmail.com Full manuscripts are due by 15 July 2022. Authors should provide a cover page giving brief biographical details (up to 100 words), institutional affiliation(s) and full contact information, including an email address. Articles may be no longer than 6,500 words including the abstract (up to 125 words), keywords (6 to 8 in alphabetical order with no duplication of words from the title), notes, captions, tables, and acknowledgements (if any), biographical details (taken from the cover page), and references. Images in a text count for 200 words each. Girlhood Studies, following Berghahn’s preferred house style, uses a modified Chicago Style. See http://journals.berghahnbooks.com/_uploads/ghs/girlhood-studies_style_guide.pdf If images are used, authors are expected to secure the copyright themselves and they are expected to follow IRB protocols and ethical research standards regarding girls and young women as subjects.   References Decker, Corrie 2010. “Reading, Writing, and Respectability: How Schoolgirls Developed Modern Literacies in Colonial Zanzibar.” International Journal of African Historical Studies 43(1): 89–114. George, Abosede A. 2014. Making Modern Girls: A History of Girlhood, Labor, and Social Development in Colonial Lagos. Athens, OH: Ohio University Press. Haffejee, Sadiyya, Astrid Treffry-Goatley, Lisa Wiebesiek, and Nkonzo Mkhize. 2020. “Negotiating Girl-led Advocacy: Addressing Early and Forced Marriage in South Africa.” Girlhood Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal 13 (2): 18–34. Kashunga, Jen. 2019. “Contesting Black Girlhood(s) beyond Northern Borders: Exploring a Black African Girl Approach.” In The Black Girlhood Studies Collection, ed. Aria S. Halliday, 45–79. Toronto, CA.: Women’s Press. Mitchell, Claudia, and Relebohile Moletsane 2018. Disrupting Shameful Legacies: Girls and Young Women Speak Back through the Arts to Address Sexual Violence. Leiden, NL: Brill Sense. Moletsane, Relebohile, Lisa Wiebesiek, Astrid Treffry-Goatley, and April Mandrona 2021. Ethical Practice in Participatory Visual Research with Girls: Transnational Approaches. New York, NY: Berghahn Books. Switzer, Heather D. 2018. When the Light is Fire: Maasai Schoolgirls in Contemporary Kenya. Champaign, IL: University of Illinois Press. Contact Info:  Catherine Cymone Fourshey is an Associate Professor in History and International Relations at Bucknell University. Marla Jaksch is Professor and Barbara Meyers Pelson Chair in Faculty-Student Engagement/ Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at The College of New Jersey Relebohile Moletsane is Professor and John Langalibalele Dube Chair in Rural Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal. Contact Email:  africangirlhoods@gmail.com URL:  https://journals.berghahnbooks.com/_uploads/ghs/GHS_cfp_AfricanGHS.pdf
    By: Raquel Acosta
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    CFP: Fractured Skies: Civil Aviation and the Global South
    Airplanes and civil aviation have played a central role in the economics, politics, and cultures of the twentieth century. They have been crucial in both twentieth century nationalism and internationalism, and in the politics of independent nation-state building and the construction of colonial empires. Aeromobility and airmindedness have been essential for shaping a vivid, material imagination of a globally connected world, and the development of civil aviation has emerged as a key goal of states, rich and poor.    Histories of civil aviation have traditionally followed internist contours, with a focus on the history of airline development or linear approaches to technical innovations and progress. In recent years however new historiographical and methodological approaches have opened up new vistas by bringing in broader geographical, cultural, political, economic, and social currents.    This workshop seeks to bring together these new perspectives to explore aviation in relation to the Global South. It looks to bring these new historiographical and methodological currents in the history of aviation into conversation with developments in other fields of history and further afield in the social sciences and humanities.We invite historians, sociologists, anthropologists, political scientists, geographers, and scholars from other interested disciplines to reflect on all aspects of civil aviation, aerial mobility, and aerial infrastructure in the Global South, including but not limited to airlines, airports, air routes, agreements and other legislation, navigation, maintenance and repair, aircraft, staff, and labour. We invite scholars who can explore the intersections of civil aviation with military aviation and other aspects of state action and governance at regional, national, and international levels through micro and macro case-studies and other interventions. This would include the role of civil aviation, aeromobility and flying sovereignty in shaping international relations, and colonial and postcolonial political, social and economic development. We welcome connections with recent literatures on race, gender, mobility, space and spatiality, infrastructures, governance and governmentality, imperialism, capitalism, international relations, security studies, and science and technology studies. The workshop is hosted jointly by Waqar Zaidi (Lahore University of Management and Sciences) and Marie Huber (Humboldt Universität zu Berlin), and will take place online, 28 - 30 June 2022. In order to foster debate and discussion during the workshop, we will request participants to submit short-form papers a few weeks in advance.  Please send a short abstract (c. 250 words) and a short CV / bionote (1 to 2 pages, in a single pdf), until March 25, to:   Dr. Marie Huber (marie.huber@hu-berlin.de),Department of History,Humboldt Universität zu Berlin, Germany AND Dr. Waqar Zaidi (waqar.zaidi@lums.edu.pk),Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,Lahore University of Management Sciences,Pakistan     Contact Info:  Dr. Marie Huber (marie.huber@hu-berlin.de),Department of History,Humboldt Universität zu Berlin, Germany AND Dr. Waqar Zaidi (waqar.zaidi@lums.edu.pk),Department of Humanities and Social Sciences,Lahore University of Management Sciences,Pakistan   Contact Email:  marie.huber@hu-berlin.de
    By: Raquel Acosta
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  • African Studies Review Call
    The African Studies Review invites expressions of interest for new Book Review Editors to join the editorial team. The ASR is committed to inclusivity and diversity. We are seeking to appoint new editors beginning March 2022. The ASR is a bilingual multidisciplinary journal publishing in English and French. Ideal candidates should have a PhD in their respective field or discipline or interdisciplinary area, be published scholars, either tenured associate professors or higher in rank, or lecturers with workplace security, comfortable reading and engaging with scholarship beyond their areas and regions of expertise. Bilingual candidates are particularly welcome. Editors should have a working command of scholarly English; a familiarity with French modes of scholarship would be a significant asset. Applicants may reside in any part of the world. Applicants working in East Africa, the Horn of Africa, and North Africa, or arabophone Africa are particularly welcome. Applicants from the African continent are especially welcome. The position of Book Review Editor is entirely voluntary and comes with no remuneration. Current Book Review Editors incorporate the position within their annual plans-of-work at their home institutions.   Book Review Editors report directly to the Editor-in-Chief (EIC) and Senior Book Review Editor. The chief responsibilities of the Book Review Editor are to regularly consult the log of books received maintained by the Managing Editor and suggest possible names of reviewers for potential invitation. The Book Review Editors will further be asked to assess book reviews once they are received, and provide feedback for these reviews. Expressions of interest in the form a single-page letter and complete curriculum vitae should be sent by email to Kathryn Salucka kathryn@africanstudies.org at your earliest convenience. Review of applications will commence February 1, 2022. Individual applicants will be invited to meet with current editors to discuss joining the team as part of the application review process.
    By: Raquel Acosta
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    Conference on Higher Education Advances (HEAd’22)
    After the great success of the last HEAd conference, with 200 participants from more than 50 countries, we are pleased to announce the Eighth International Conference on Higher Education Advances (HEAd’22), as a virtual and face-to-face conference, simultaneously. This conference is a consolidated forum for researchers and practitioners to exchange ideas, experiences, opinions and research results relating to the preparation of students, teaching/learning methodologies and the organization of educational systems. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following topic areas: Innovative materials and new tools for teaching Teaching and learning experiences Educational technology (e.g., virtual labs, e-learning) Evaluation and assessment of student learning Emerging technologies in learning (e.g., MOOC, OER, gamification) Scientific and research education Experiences outside the classroom (e.g., practicums, mobility) New teaching/learning theories and models Globalization in education and education reforms Education economics Entrepreneurship and learning for employment Education accreditation, quality and assessment Competency-based learning and skill assessment Participants from all over the world are expected to present their latest and unpublished research findings. The program committee encourages the submission of articles that communicate applied and empirical findings of interest to higher education professionals. The HEAd’22 conference will be held on June 14-17, 2022 and hosted by the Faculty of Business Administration and Management of the Universitat Politècnica de València (UPV), which has been recently ranked as the best technical university in Spain by the Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU) 2021. Valencia is the third largest city in Spain and is located on the shore of the Mediterranean Sea. It is the capital city of the Comunitat Valenciana region, which is major tourist destination in summer, and we recommend the visit once the pandemic is over. The organizing committee looks forward to welcoming you all to a fruitful conference with open discussions and important networking to promote high quality education. In case of questions related to the conference, please contact us at headconf@upv.es
    By: Raquel Acosta
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  • Apply for the next competition of the Carnegie African Diaspora Fellowship Program
      The Institute of International Education (IIE) is pleased to announce that the next round of competition for the CADFP is now open.Apply now or share this message with those who might be interested. What is the CADFP?The CADFP is a scholar exchange program for African higher education institutions to host a diaspora scholar for 14-90 days for projects in curriculum co-development, research collaboration and graduate student teaching and mentoring. Who is eligible? Accredited universities in Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, South Africa, Tanzania and Uganda, and member institutions of the African Research Universities Alliance (ARUA) (including Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia; the University of Rwanda; Cheikh Anta Diop University, Senegal; and University of Mauritius) can submit a project request to host a scholar. Scholars born in Africa, who live in the United States or Canada and work in an accredited college or university in either of those two countries, can apply online to be placed on a roster of candidates for a fellowship. Scholars must hold a terminal degree in their field and may hold any academic rank.  How do I apply?Links and information about the African host institution project request application, scholar roster application and review guidelines are posted on the CADFP website.  Interested parties are invited to register for one of our informational webinars:  Information for Diaspora Scholars, Webinar #1: Thursday, January 13 at 11 AM Eastern US TimeInformation for Potential Hosts: Wednesday, January 19 at 10 AM South Africa Standard TimeInformation for Diaspora Scholars, Webinar #2: Thursday, January 27 at 12 noon Eastern US Time After the webinars, we will post a recording on our YouTube Channel. TimelineThe deadline for project requests from host universities and scholar applications for diaspora scholars is February 28, 2022 at 11:59 pm EST. Selection decisions will be made in March-April 2022; project visits can begin as early as June 1, 2022 and must be completed by November 30, 2023. BenefitsSelected fellows receive a $150/day stipend, visa costs, limited health insurance, round-trip international air travel and ground transportation costs to and from home and the U.S./Canadian airport. Selected Host Fellows and Diaspora Fellows can apply for supplemental funds to be used for fieldwork, publication costs and workshops. The CADFP Team manages the fellowships and payments to fellows. Host institutions are encouraged to provide cost-share for the fellow’s meals, lodging and in-country transportation.For more information on the fellowship program and application process, as well as the projects of current fellows, please write to us at AfricanDiaspora@iie.org visit our website and our communities on Facebook and Twitter.  
    By: Raquel Acosta
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    Ufahamu: A Journal of African Studies, Call for Submissions
    CALL FOR PAPERS CLOSES FEBRUARY 15TH   SEND SUBMISSIONS TO UFAHAMU@GMAIL.COM     CALL FOR PAPERS FOR UFAHAMU DUE FEB. 15, 2022   The editors of Ufahamu: A Journal of African Studies are currently accepting submissions for Volume 43, Issue 2.  In honor of the journal’s recent 50th anniversary of publication, this special retrospective issue will include republished essays from the back catalog alongside new submissions including, but not limited to:   Essays Poems Book reviews Visual arts   This call gives special consideration to those submissions which directly engage with the themes covered in the first decades of Ufahamu’s publication.  Examples include direct engagement with a previously published article in Ufahamu, a paper written through citations of past Ufahamu writings, or any submission addressing themes such as:   Anti-colonialism National liberation Consciousness Pan-Africanism Black Marxisms Diaspora Activist-intellectualism and much more!   The editors are also soliciting articles concerning contemporary political issues in Africa and the diaspora in the spirit of Ufahamu’s original activist-academic ethos.   Ufahamu’s full catalog is freely available and digitized at https://escholarship.org/uc/international_asc_ufahamu/1/1   For more information about Ufahamu, please visit https://international.ucla.edu/asc/ufahamu   ----------------   Information forwarded by the UCLA African Studies Center – www.international.ucla.edu/africa    
    By: Raquel Acosta
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    Feminist Africa, Volume 2, Issue 2 (2021): Gender and Sexuality in African Futurism
    The newest issue of Feminist Africa is now available! The theme of the issue is "Gender and Sexuality in African Futurism." You can access the full issue at Current Issue - Feminist Africa. Learn more about Feminist Africa here.   TABLE OF CONTENTS Editorial: Gender and Sexuality in African Futurism · by Jacqueline-Bethel Tchouta Mougoué Feature Articles “How to Save the World from Aliens, Yet Keep Their Infrastructure”: Repurposing the “Master’s House” in The Wormwood Trilogy · by Jenna N. Hanchey and Godfried Asante When the Lagoons Remember: An Afroqueer Futurist Reading of “Blue Ecologies of Agitation” · by Kwame Edwin Otu “One Foot on the Other Side”: An Africanfuturist Reading of Irenosen Okojie’s Butterfly Fish (2015) and Akwaeke Emezi’s Freshwater (2018) · by Kelsey Ann McFaul Haunted Airports and Sexual Anxieties in Nana Nyarko Boateng’s “Swallowing Ice” · by Delali Kumavie Africanfuturism and the Reframing of Gender in the Fiction of Nnedi Okorafor · by Arit Oku Standpoint The Liquid Space where African Feminism and African Futurism Meet · by Minna Salami Fiction Land of My Dreams · by Juliana Makuchi Nfah-Abbenyi Exhibition The Afrofuturist Village · by Masiyaleti Mbewe Reviews  “Liberation is Necessarily an Act of Culture”: A Review of Spirit Desire · by Luam Kidane Methodologies in Caribbean Research on Gender and Sexuality  · by Sylvia Tamale  Fashioning Postfeminism: Spectacular Femininity and Transnational Culture  · by Rosemary Oyinlola Popoola  
    By: Raquel Acosta

  • Support for Summer Akan, Swahili, Wolof Study
    Indiana University is accepting applications for fellowships and scholarships to support study in its intensive summer programs in Akan, Swahili or Wolof in summer 2022. Courses are offered in an in-person/online hybrid format or a fully online format.   Participants may also join a 1-credit African Studies course in English: "Military Engagement and Global Power Competition in Africa." All participants pay in-state tuition and earn 6-10 credits. Several scholarship and fellowship programs are available. Funding and priority admission application deadline is January 29, 2022.   See http://languageworkshop.indiana.edu for course-by-course details and application forms. Questions? Write to us at languageworkshop@indiana.edu Read more or reply
    By: Raquel Acosta
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    U.S. Mission in Uganda Public Affairs Annual Program Statement
    The U.S. Mission in Uganda’s Public Affairs Office is pleased to announce that funding is available through the Public Diplomacy Grant Program for projects ranging in value from $5,000 to $40,000. Projects for greater values will be considered on a case-by-case basis.    Grants are intended for committed and organized civil-society organizations, local representatives of civil society, think tanks, non-governmental organizations, cultural institutions, and academic institutions. Awards to individuals will also be considered on a case-by-case basis. All grantees must have a non-profit status.    Notice: For Fiscal Year 2022 all proposals submitted in response to this Annual Program Statement must include a contingency plan describing how the proposed activity would be implemented in the event that COVID-19 related health restrictions are in place during the anticipated period of performance.    Objectives and Project Outcomes:  The objectives of the Public Diplomacy Grant Program are to promote positive relations between the people of Uganda and the United States; reinforce shared values; and connect high potential Ugandan youth and young professionals (aged 16 to 35) as well as established professional leaders to the American people through projects that:  Help Ugandan youth aged 16 – 35, especially young women, explore and discover their potential through innovative science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) programs, as well as entrepreneurship programs.  Encourage Ugandan youth aged 16 – 35 to participate in civic life through social entrepreneurship, volunteerism, and community engagement.  Strengthen understanding of U.S. values and institutions; highlight U.S. culture, including American Studies; and support diversity, inclusion, and equality.  Utilize the power of the arts to promote positive self-expression, social change, and economic opportunity among Ugandan youth aged 16 – 35.  Equip emerging community leaders (e.g., sports coaches, arts instructors, and cultural professionals) aged 22 – 35 with the skills and knowledge necessary to grow their organizations or to enhance their engagement with youth audiences.  Promote the development and application of new technologies and innovative solutions to economic, environmental, and social challenges. Projects could connect U.S. technology or public policy experts with Ugandan peers or foster the application of American technology and innovations to address challenges in Ugandan communities.  Support civil society organizations (CSOs) in developing a vibrant and prosperous democratic society through programs that strengthen NGO management, enhance the skills of early to mid-career NGO/CSO professionals, strengthen networks between NGO/CSO professionals in the United States and Uganda, or demonstrate to the public the positive role CSOs play in advancing a prosperous, healthy, and informed society.      U.S. Content  In order to be eligible for funding consideration, proposals must demonstrate significant U.S. content.  U.S. content can include, for example, the substantial participation of U.S. experts or alumni of U.S. government exchange programs, partnership with U.S. organizations or educational institutions, the involvement of U.S. companies present in Uganda, the application or adaptation of U.S. models and best practices, or learning materials related to American history, society, culture, government, or institutions. Initiatives that promote sustained cooperation between the people of the United States and Uganda even after program funding has concluded are encouraged.  Proposals without significant U.S. content will not be considered for funding.    Activities that are typically funded include, but are not limited to:  Programs that reinforce and amplify lessons learned by alumni of State Department-funded exchange programs (both American and Ugandan alumni);  Youth engagement and leadership programs;  Workshops, seminars, trainings, and master classes on American themes or issues of mutual interest mentioned in the above goals of the Program;  Programs to empower young women;  Radio, television, and social media training and programming in support of the above program objectives;  Programs designed as a partnership between a Ugandan and U.S. organization;  Initiatives in support of the above program objectives that make creative use of the Mission’s American Center in Kampala or Nile Explorer bus, a mobile classroom that provides extracurricular learning opportunities in STEM and other subjects through visits to underserved communities across Uganda.    Activities that are not typically funded include, but are not limited to:  Social welfare, community development, or vocational skilling projects,  Fees and travel costs to attend conferences in the United States,  Ongoing salary costs and office equipment,  Paying to complete activities begun with other funds,  Projects that are inherently political in nature or that contain the appearance of partisanship/support to individual or single party electoral campaigns,  Political party activities,  Projects that support specific religious activities,  Trade activities; fundraising campaigns; commercial projects; scientific research; construction projects; or projects whose primary aim is the institutional development of the organization itself.  For more information or to apply, please visit grants.gov
    By: Derek Tobias
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  • Call For Papers: 8th International Conference on Higher Education Advances
        We are pleased to announce the Eighth International Conference on Higher Education Advances (HEAd’22), as a hybrid conference (in-person and virtual conference, simultaneously). Every year, HEAd brings together around 250 participants from more than 50 countries to exchange ideas, experiences and research results related to the preparation of students, teaching/learning methodologies and the organization of educational systems.      The HEAd'22 conference will be held on June 14-17, 2022 on the Faculty of Business Administration and Management of the Universitat Politècnica de València (UPV), which has been recently ranked as the best technical university in Spain by the Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU) 2021.   The program committee encourages the submission of articles that communicate applied and empirical findings of interest to higher education professionals. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following topic areas: Innovative materials and new tools for teaching Educational technology (e.g., virtual labs, e-learning) Evaluation and assessment of student learning Emerging technologies in learning (e.g., MOOC, OER, gamification) Scientific and research education Experiences outside the classroom (e.g., practicums, mobility) New teaching/learning theories and models Globalization in education and education reforms Education economics Teaching and learning experiences Entrepreneurship and learning for employment Education accreditation, quality and assessment Competency-based learning and skill assessment Important Dates Submission deadline: February 4, 2022Acceptance notification: April 6, 2022Camera ready due: April 25, 2022Conference dates: June 14-17, 2022 Publications All accepted papers will appear in the conference proceedings with a DOI and ISBN number. They will be published in open access by UPV Press and submitted to be indexed in major international bibliographic databases. Previous editions are indexed in Scopus and the Thomson-Reuters Conference Proceedings Citation Index - Web of Science Core Collection (former ISI Proceedings). Awards The Program Committee will select the winners for the Best Paper and Best Student Paper awards. To be eligible for the best student paper award, the presenting author of the paper must be a full-time student. Submission guidelines Authors from all over the world are invited to submit original and unpublished papers, which are not under review in any other conference or journal. All papers will be peer reviewed by the program committee based on their originality, significance, methodological soundness, and clarity of exposition.   Submitted papers must be written in English and should be in PDF format. They must follow the instructions in the template file, available in Microsoft Word format at: http://www.headconf.org/template.docx   Paper length must be between 4 and 8 pages, incorporating all text, references, figures and tables. Submissions imply the willingness of at least one author to register, attend the conference, and present the paper.   HEAd'22 is using the OCS platform of UPV Press to manage the submissions. This platform provides you with a submissions homepage where you can register your paper submission and make appropriate changes. The submission website is: http://www.headconf.org/submission-instructions/   The organizing committee looks forward to welcoming you all to a fruitful conference with open discussions and important networking to promote high quality education.
    By: Raquel Acosta
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  • Yar’adua Foundation Partners UNN To Open Sexual Harassment Portal
    An innovation at UNN to address issues of sexual harassment and assault, making it easier for vicitims to report. This pilot could help other institutions to develop similar programs.   https://independent.ng/yaradua-foundation-partners-unn-to-open-sexual-harassment-portal/    
    By: Amy Jamison
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