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Education


  • Top 100 Universities in Africa
    Recently, Unirank published the 2021 African University Ranking of the top 200 recognized higher education institutions in Africa. AAP is proud to highlight eight of our consortium members who have been selected for this list:  University of Pretoria (2)  Makerere University (18)  University of Botswana (26)  University of Dar es Salaam (31)  University of Cheikh Anta Diop (37)  University of Nigeria (43)  United States International University Africa (55)  Egerton University (82)  AAP applauds our members for the recognition of their hard work and innovative thinking, and we are excited to see what the future holds for our partnership with these outstanding universities.     To see the full article/list visit: Top 200 Universities in Africa | 2021 African University Ranking (4icu.org)   
    By: Raquel Acosta
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  • AAUW International Fellowships
    International Fellowships have been in existence since 1917. The program provides support for women pursuing full-time graduate or postdoctoral study in the United States to women who are not U.S. citizens or permanent residents, and who intend to return to their home country to pursue a professional career. A limited number of awards are available for study outside of the U.S. (excluding the applicant’s home country) to women who are members of Graduate Women International (see the list of GWI affiliates). Both graduate and postgraduate studies at accredited U.S. institutions are supported.   Applicants must have earned the equivalent of a U.S. bachelor’s degree by the application deadline and must have applied to their proposed institutions of study by the time of the application. Recipients are selected for academic achievement and demonstrated commitment to women and girls.   Recipients return to their home countries to become leaders in business, government, academia, community activism, the arts or scientific fields.   For more information or to apply, visit the AAUW webiste.
    By: Derek Tobias
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    Gandhi-King Scholarly Exchange Initiative
    The Study of the U.S. Branch (ECA/A/E/USS), Office of Academic Exchange Programs, Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA), invites proposal submissions from accredited U.S. post-secondary education institutions, including Minority Serving Institutions (MSIs) such as Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs); community colleges, liberal arts colleges, public and private universities; and other U.S. public and private non-profit organizations meeting the provisions of a 501(c)3 organization (see NOFO, section C. Eligibility Information) for the design and implementation of the new Gandhi-King Scholarly Exchange Initiative to take place over six weeks (inclusive of travel days), virtually and in-person, beginning in summer 2022. The Gandhi-King Scholarly Exchange Initiative will include four components: a) a one-week virtual program component; b.) a two-week academic residency in the United States; c) a two-week experiential learning program in India; and d) a multi-day closing forum.   The Gandhi-King Scholarly Exchange Initiative (Exchange) aims to inspire young leaders from the United States and India to work together to advance civil rights, social justice, and inclusion locally, nationally, and globally by exploring the history and legacies of Mahatma Gandhi and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. The Exchange will seek to develop participants’ leadership skills and equip them with the tools and networks to support these endeavors. Approximately 20 undergraduate and graduate students ages 18-25, ten (10) from the United States and ten (10) from India, will participate in the program. The program will draw on the long history of friendship and shared interests between the United States and India, and will provide participants with opportunities for interaction with diverse groups of Americans and Indians. The Exchange will also include opportunities for continued follow-on engagement once participants return to their respective countries. Please see the full announcement for additional information.   For more information or to apply, visit grants.gov
    By: Derek Tobias
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    Online Lecture Series - Poverty Violence and Migration in the Red Sea Region
    This lecture series will showcase new research into the historical causes and contemporary dynamics of structural poverty, political violence, and large-scale migration in the Red Sea Region. The invited speakers each recognize the continuing importance of longstanding intra-regional connections, and their lectures will shed light on the ways that the coping strategies currently pursued at individual, household, community, and state levels are shaped by the legacies of past practices.   More information can be found at: https://www.zmo.de/en/events/lecture-series/vortragsreihe-im-akademischen-jahr-21-22   To obtain the zoom meeting details, please register at: https://tinyurl.com/5xswd368   This lecture series is organized by Dr. Steven Serels of the Leibniz-Zentrum Moderner Orient in Berlin in coordination with RedSeaNet.
    By: Raquel Acosta
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    Global South Feminist Scholar Award
    This award is conceived to recognise the significant contributions of mid-career to senior scholars in and from the Global South to feminist and gender scholarship in IR broadly defined. Hegemonic Euro- and West-centrism often renders the important work of this category of scholars invisible as study after study from within and without the ISA has shown. Because their subjects, methods, sources, resources, theories and frameworks are evaluated according to standards of scholarship set by the Global North academy, this work is often devalued and invisibilized. At the same time, scholars from the North, feminist or not, draw upon these and other indigenous knowledges, often without acknowledgement, to better situate their own research on those contexts.   Thus, this award addresses the acknowledged tendency for epistemologies of the Global South to be marginalised and unaccounted for both in IR specifically, and global knowledge production in general, and for feminist scholarship to be diminished within the various disciplines. It aims to decentre whiteness, recognise other universes of knowledge, acknowledge the contributions of Global South studies to the global academy, and engender the decolonisation of the field of feminist and gender studies, and of international studies itself.   In doing these, the proposed award enhances the ongoing efforts at inclusion and transformation within the FTGS, complementing existing awards which recognise excellence in feminist research, while at the same time filling a gap in redefining excellence in more global and inclusive terms. Eligibility Scholars in the area of feminist theory and gender studies whose scholarship have extended the frontiers of the discipline and advanced our understanding about Global South contexts in particular Must be from the Global South and based at institutions located there  Must have made significant and demonstrable impact (locally or internationally) on the fields of feminism, gender and international studies, broadly defined, either through scholarship and teaching, mentoring, leadership, policy-relevant work, or any combination of these Targets mid-career to senior scholars specifically Nominees need not be members of ISA and FTGS at the time of nomination, but awardees are expected to become members of ISA and FTGS upon conferment of the award Nominations The award committee eagerly solicits nominations from all across the globe of individuals who meet the above criteria. Given the structural barriers already identified above, the newly-constituted award committee will also actively reach out to individuals, institutions and networks in the Global South for nominations. Nominators may submit (a) a nomination letter highlighting the fitness of the nominee for this award (b) nominee’s abridged CV, no more than 5 pages long, and (c) supporting letters (if available) from persons familiar with the nominee’s scholarship and work. Nomination and supporting letters should not exceed two pages each. Self-nominations are welcome. Prize The recipient will receive a certificate and a cash prize of $800.   How to apply Submit all documents by email to the chair of the award committee, Olajumoke Yacob-Haliso, yacob-halisoo@babcock.edu.ng. The deadline for nomination this year is October 18, 2021. About the FTGS   The Feminist Theory and Gender Studies section of the International Studies Association brings together scholars who apply feminist theory to International Relations or look at the field through a gender lens. For more information, visit: https://www.isanet.org/ISA/Sections/FTGS.
    By: Raquel Acosta
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  • Higher Education in Africa: Current status and perspectives for inclusive transformation
    African universities are expected to help tackle challenges facing the African society and realise the aspirations of the Africa Agenda 2063 and the UN Agenda for Sustainable Development Goals 2030 in the current context of globalization of higher education. Unfortunately, there have been substantial challenges affecting Higher Education in Africa, notably the disparities in gender inclusion, limiting the potential of women, and the decline in average public expenditure per tertiary education student, making Sub Sahara Africa tertiary education enrollment ratio the lowest in the world.    In this edition, we have published nine papers addressing issues related to higher education in Kenya, Uganda, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Cameroon, Zambia, Mozambique, Ethiopia, and Sudan. In particular, the issue brings insights into the future of the African University, the importance of regional academic training programs, the gender disparities in participation in Science, Technology, and Innovation, and the mechanisms for financing and strengthening higher education in Africa.
    By: Raquel Acosta
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  • Universities’ key role in the future of global food systems
    African academics say that partnerships and collective action across different sectors, including higher education and research, are needed to actualise the resolutions agreed upon at the United Nations Food Systems Summit held on 23 September in New York.“The common message and commitment to global partnership for collective action, and the urgency to address the climate change challenge, as well as other environmental hazards, resonates well with the commitments that emerged from several national and regional dialogues, including those facilitated by RUFORUM,” said Professor Adipala Ekwamu, executive secretary of the Regional Universities Forum for Capacity Building in Agriculture (RUFORUM).The key issue, however, is the implementation of the agreed action points of the eight-month regional dialogues that preceded the summit, he said.For Africa, what is needed are efforts to revamp investments in various agriculture initiatives, and adequately invest in science, technology and innovation and in human capital development to elicit the necessary responses and change.Inclusivity“Africa must also engage more actively in harnessing digital technologies and its renewable energy resources. Above all, we will need to maintain focus on ensuring inclusivity in the different undertakings. Continued academia-science-policy interaction will help us leapfrog forward,” Ekwamu said.The UN event recognised the fact that food systems cannot thrive without all sectors working together as one; hence, the need to involve various sectors of government, and the need for interaction of “multiple scientific disciplines”, as well as traditional and indigenous knowledge.The summit also emphasised the need to scale up public and private financing for food production as well as science and research.According to Kay Muir-Leresche, retired professor of natural resource economics and member of the RUFORUM international advisory panel, the role of universities in the future of food systems “needs much greater emphasis – not as ivory towers but as the spigots that can play a central facilitating role”.She said she was disappointed by what she viewed as a lack of focus on implementation and adequate acknowledgement of the place of science and universities in implementing the resolutions.Fragmentation“I have to say that, in general, I am rather disappointed at the very fragmented response … a wide menu of disparate commitments that do not seem to focus on what is needed to make all these things work … building human capital to use new technologies to apply to solving the problems,” she said.In her view, the outcomes needed to have placed more emphasis on investment in the people and institutions that can help to achieve change, by building the capacity for science and the generation of knowledge, as well as in sharing it.“At the moment, it is just many promises to carry out particular things by many actors – not a concerted attempt to address the core problems,” she said, adding that the creation of knowledge by using new approaches that can reach all levels and involve all stakeholders was critical.Equally important was to build the capacity required to use knowledge generated by universities and research institutions for the agriculture sector. The “creation and sharing of knowledge [should be] integrated with building capacity”, she suggested.OperationalisationAccording to Dr Florence Nakayiwa, RUFORUM deputy executive secretary for planning, resource mobilisation and management, commitments made during the summit deserved appreciation and support. What was now required, however, were mechanisms to operationalise them.“We believe the summit process that garnered views from different stakeholders will hold countries and institutions accountable for the promises they made. We want to see a system where there is interface and coherence across the sectors in meeting the post-summit actions,” she said.She said local context was key to the success of the pledges, and decisions made at implementation stage needed to be evidence-based and recognise existing realities.“We should invest in and use the human capital that we have on the continent for sustainable initiatives,” she said.
    By: Raquel Acosta

  • The Seventh African Higher Education Week & RUFORUM Triennial Conference 2021
    The Seventh Africa Higher Education and RUFORUM Triennial Conference is set under the theme “Operationalising Higher Education for Innovation, Industrialisation, Inclusion and Sustainable Economic Development in Africa: A call for action” that responds to the urgent needs for the African governments, development partners, private sector and citizenry to take actions to invest in higher education. This Triennial conference is convened with the following objectives: Catalyse investment in Higher Education for human capital development in Africa Promote international linkages and partnerships for excellence in Higher Education Strengthen collaboration and mutual learning to spur innovation and industrialisation for economic transformation in Africa Promote youth employment and skills acquisition for development Strengthen University-Private sector business linkages The First RUFORUM Triennial Conference, the 16th Annual General Meeting and 7th African Higher Education Week will be held in the Republic of Benin at Centre International de Conférences et Palais des Congres de Cotonou, Benin from 6th-10th December 2021. The five-day conference will bring together policy makers including Ministers and Technical Experts, Higher Education Leaders in Africa, development partners, private sector leaders, researchers, innovators, students, and farmer organisations, among others. Approximately 1000 delegates are expected from across the world.
    By: Raquel Acosta
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    Call for Thought Pieces Regarding Race and Ethnicity in Africa and the Diaspora
    AAP is issuing a call for thought pieces from anywhere in the world that are short, critical reflections of issues around race and ethnicity in higher education institutions as well as other key stakeholder organizations in Africa and the African Diaspora.   The first deadline for thought piece summary (up to 500 words) is Oct. 30, 2021. Summaries must include title, text, author’s name and affiliation.   For the full call for contributions and submission details, visit the link below. https://aap.isp.msu.edu/engage/aap-perspectives/    
    By: Raquel Acosta
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  • CFA: Endangered Archives Programme Call for Applications is Open
    The Endangered Archives Programme is now accepting preliminary applications for the next annual funding round – the deadline for submission of preliminary applications is Monday 15 November 2021 at 12 noon GMT. Full details of the application procedures and documentation are available on the EAP website (https://eap.bl.uk/applicants).   The Programme has funded over 430 projects in 90 countries and has helped preserve manuscripts, rare printed books, newspapers and periodicals, audio and audio-visual materials, photographs and artwork. The programme aims to digitise archives at risk of loss or decay and, where appropriate, to relocate the material to a safe local archival home. The digital copies are deposited with the local archival partners, and are all available for researchers to access freely through the British Library website.   This year, we are accepting applications through our online portal between 1st and 15th November. However, in the meantime, we are providing Word and PDF documents for applicants to perfect their preliminary applications before the online submission.   If you know of an archive in a region of the world were resources are limited, we really hope you will apply. If you have any questions regarding the conditions of award or the application process, consult our website (https://eap.bl.uk) or contact them at endangeredarchives@bl.uk
    By: Raquel Acosta
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  • AAP Public Dialogue Series 2021
    AAP is excited to be hosting our next Public Dialogue “The Engaged University: Working with policy makers, the private sector, and communities to advance African higher education transformation” on Wednesday, September 22nd at 9:00am-10:30 EDT. This dialogue session will be co-hosted by our affiliates at @The University of Botswana and those at @SARUA. This session will examine innovative strategies for African universities to engage across all sectors and the impact these engagements are having on the transformation of the African higher education sector. AAP recognizes that universities are now seeing themselves as catalysts for positive change in their communities and beyond, and is proud to be a part of this progress.    This series will be done with the help of @University World News as AAP’s media partner.
    By: Raquel Acosta
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  • Connecting with Prof Ayiro and Daystar University
    Professor and Vice Chancellor Laban Ayiro from Daystar University, Provost Teresa Woodruff,  ISP Dean Steve Hanson, AAP leadership, and faculty in the College of Communications Arts and Sciences had the opportunity to meet Aug 24. Prof Ayiro met with leadership from the College of Communications and the KEY Team to discuss potential collaborative relationships. AAP is grateful for connecting with Prof Ayiro and Daystar University.     Attached are photos from the event and lunch with Prof. Ayiro capturing Provost Teresa Woodruff, Professor Laban Ayiro, ISP Dean Steve Hanson, AAP Director Jose Jackson-Malete, AAP Director, Amy Jamison, Prof. David Ewoldsen, and Prof. Nancy Rhodes.
    By: Raquel Acosta
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