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  • Call for proposals: 'Evidence for Innovation'
    Eligibility All proposals must identify potential innovation support programs that might form the basis of their research program. Direct-entry  grants will be required to provide a detailed methodology suitable for examining the identified innovation support program(s).  Stage 1 proposals must identify principal and co-principal  investigators based at a public research organization  (e.g., a government-legislated public or private university) or a non-profit research organization (e.g., think tanks).  Direct- entry proposals will also have a principal investigator from a research organization but will include collaborator  from innovation agencies that have or had some responsibility for the implementation of the innovation support program being investigated.  Stage 1 grants are to include representatives from two or more countries. Direct-entry grants do not have to involve two or more countries.  Eligible countries: This funding opportunity supports applications led from and focused on the following countries: Afghanistan; Angola; Benin; Burkina Faso; Burundi; Bangladesh; Bhutan; Cambodia; Central African Republic; Chad; Democratic Republic of the Congo; Djibouti; Eritrea; Ethiopia; Gambia; Ghana; Guinea; Guinea-Bissau; Haiti; Lao People’s Democratic Republic; Liberia; Lesotho; Madagascar; Malawi; Mali; Mauritania; Mozambique; Myanmar; Nepal; Niger; Rwanda; Senegal; Sierra Leone; Somalia; South Sudan; Sudan; Togo; Timor-Leste; Uganda; United Republic of Tanzania; Yemen; Zambia and Zimbabwe. For purposes of this call, the lead administrative organization must be based in the countries above. Applicants from the island states of Tuvalu, Kiribati, Solomon Islands, Comoros, and São Tomé and Príncipe may participate but as members of a consortia.   Scope   This funding opportunity aims to:  generate new evidence on the performance and the distributional impacts of innovation support programs for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs),   promote collaboration between researchers and innovation agencies, and   strengthen networks and capacity for analysis and implementation of innovation policies.    Research focus: The funding opportunity supports research that generates evidence on the performance and distributional impacts of SME support programs or policies (e.g., on women-led enterprises, access to goods and services in underserved communities, employment for youth). There are a wide range of policies and services that seek to create and develop SMEs, referred to here as innovation support programs. The performance of such programs has been examined but there is considerable scope to strengthen the evidence base in lower-income countries.   It aims to support an integrative approach to understanding both the firm/economic performance of innovation support programs as well as their social impacts by integrating equity, diversity and inclusion (EDI) analyses. The rationale for this focus stems from an interest in promoting evidence-informed decision-making as well as understanding the strengths and weaknesses of targeted EDI initiatives and how economic policies can support social development goals (e.g., gender equality).    Collaboration: The funding opportunity invites active involvement and leadership from both researchers and agency staff responsible for designing and/or implementing innovation support programs. Non-academic collaborators may involve representatives from government and non-profit or for-profit agencies.  It is expected that this collaboration will facilitate access to data, improve empirical analysis, and position research evidence for application.    Sequenced funding:  The application deadline for Stage 1 and direct-entry grants is July 28, 2021.  Stage 1 grants will fund survey research and network development over a 12-month period. This preparatory phase will position teams to submit detailed Stage 2 proposals, which would support in-depth analysis of identified innovation support programs. Direct-entry grants are designed to support time-sensitive research projects that can be mobilized quickly to advance the aims of this call.  More details For more information, please read the program description for this funding opportunity. A frequently asked questions page will be maintained to respond to applicant questions.  For further inquiries, contact e4i@idrc.ca.  If you are eligible for this opportunity, we welcome you to submit an application. 
    By: Madeleine Futter
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  • AAP Invitation for Proposals 2021: Transforming Institutions Strategic Funding
    The Alliance for African Partnership (AAP) seeks proposals from AAP consortium members and their partners for activities which directly address AAP's Transforming Institutions pillar (transforming institutions to be better able to participate in sustainable, equitable, and research-driven partnerships that make a broader impact on transforming lives). Successful applicants will receive seed funding to develop international strategic partnerships with universities, institutions of higher education and research, and/or organizations in the public or NGO sectors. Travel can include any of the following—within Africa, to Africa from external locations, to the US, or to other locations outside of Africa. Virtual engagement is highly encouraged, and proposals that include in-person travel or meetings should provide a contingency plan in case circumstances prevent traveling or meeting in-person (COVID contingency plan including a budget). Proposed partnerships should focus specifically on institutional strengthening and capacity development. This could include projects that aim to build institutional strengths; to contribute to individuals’ capacity development which will lead to institutional strengthening; to plan for new units or institution-wide initiatives; and/or to pilot new approaches to research support, teaching or outreach that can eventually be scaled up across the institution(s). Some examples of the types of programs that could fall under this funding initiative: developing plans or programs to improve institutional research management structures, building capacity of administrative units or leaders, improving structures for outreach and research dissemination, creating new and innovative curricula or pedagogical approaches in priority areas, or strengthening student service units focused on career services and/or entrepreneurship. Proposals that solely focus on research topics unrelated to institutional capacity development and do not directly address how the work contributes to institutional strengthening will not be considered. For examples of past awards, visit Transforming Institutions Past Awardees. Guidelines Proposals may be submitted in one of the following three project categories in support of institutional strengthening and capacity development: Exploratory Projects to support initial-stage partnership development. This funding is meant for new partnerships that have not previously worked together. Proposal Development Projects to support partners to develop a proposal in response to a specific funding opportunity.  Pilot Workshop Projects to support short-term training activities or workshops. We highly encourage projects that incorporate South-South collaboration. This has been identified as an AAP priority and will be factored into the selection process. We also encourage collaboration across Francophone and Anglophone countries/consortium members. Proposals that address building the administrative capacity of universities (e.g., research management, finance, fundraising and advancement, career services, communications and publishing, governance and leadership, etc.) will also receive priority in review. Funding can cover travel and/or associated meeting or workshop costs. The budget may also cover salary/fringe expenses up to $5,000 USD. AAP will consider proposals up to a maximum of $20,000 USD requested funds (not including cost share). Proposals should include a combined 20% cost share contribution across all the partner institutions (with each institution contributing some amount). This contribution could be monetary, in-kind, or a combination of the two. Eligibility Proposals should include co-PIs from each of the partner institutions included in the proposal and must include a PI from MSU and PI(s) from at least one other AAP consortium member (AAP Consortium members include MSU, Egerton University, Makerere University, University of Dar es Salaam, Lilongwe University of Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of Botswana, University of Nigeria-Nsukka, Université Cheikh Anta Diop, Université des Lettres et des Sciences Humaines de Bamako, University of Pretoria, United States International University – Africa, and ReNAPRI). Those who served as a PI (project lead) on a previously funded AAP Transforming Institutions Strategic Funding project are not eligible to lead a proposal for this competition but may participate in the proposed project as a team member. Faculty members may only be listed (as PI or as team member) on one proposal submitted to AAP for each round of funding. AAP will work with teams once awarded to verify a timeline for when activities will be completed. (Teams should aim to carry out projects between October 1, 2021 and August 15, 2022). Evaluation Criteria Criteria that will be used to evaluate the proposals includes: Evidence of a shared vision and mutually beneficial interests among the partners as well as a joint commitment to the success of the proposed partnership Clarity of the connection of proposed activities to AAP’s Transforming Institutions pillar Demonstrated integration of gender, equity, and inclusion principles Quality of short-term outputs/outcomes of proposed activities Potential for a sustained, productive partnership; quality of long-term impacts of proposed activities Potential for leveraging significant external funding. Indicators used to evaluate the outputs/outcomes of completed projects include: Evidence of continued productive collaboration among partner institutions around transforming all organizations involved in the partnership The number and quality of institutional improvements that stem from the partnership activities Symposia or conferences held to disseminate work stemming from the partnership activities Collaborative grant applications submitted and awarded Collaborative research publications completed Other measures of institutional transformation as proposed by the implementing teams A follow-up report including data on these criteria will be required 30 days after the program end date. Partnership Activities Proposed partnerships should center on capacity building activities, including external funding proposal development and dissemination of outputs, that contribute to transformation at all partnering institutions. Proposed activities should ultimately lead to potential long-term collaborations among the partner institutions. Follow-on funding may be allocated for continued support to develop these partnerships depending on the outcomes of the initial budget and availability of funds. Partnership Funding Transforming Institutions partnership funds will provide partial support of travel, meeting, and workshop costs for AAP consortium faculty members and their partners. The Co-PIs’ colleges, faculties and/or departments will be expected to contribute to the costs of the proposed activities to ensure that the commitment to long-term partnering is shared by these units. A total of 20% match (monetary and/or in-kind) is required with contributions from all partners. These awards should ultimately result in the development and submission of a collaborative funding proposal (including partner institution faculty) for external funding as well as having positive impacts on other indicators of institutional transformation. Proposal Requirements Proposals must be submitted in English and should include: Narrative (not to exceed five pages) which addresses specifically: The activities being proposed for this funding. Please include a description of the activities, the role of each partner, and the timeline. Applicants must also include a COVID contingency plan for any in-person meetings or travel The proposed topics or issues that the activities will address A general description of the partners and individuals who will take part in the project The history of partnership among those involved and the potential for sustained future engagement A description of the partners’ shared vision and how each partner will benefit from the proposed activities Considerations taken for gender, equity, and inclusion (in terms of the team members and the project activities) How the activities will contribute to transforming all the institutions included in the partnership. Please describe the objectives of the activities, the anticipated short-term outcomes of the project, and their relation to the institutions’ needs The anticipated longer-term outcomes and impact of the proposed activities Identification of external funding opportunities that could support the proposed research/activities in the future Written endorsements from the applicants’ deans, department chairpersons, or supervisors committing to a total minimum of 20% matching funds and a description of any monetary or in-kind contributions from partner institutions. Proposed itemized budget. Please use the provided budget template. Submitting a Proposal Please submit proposals via our online submission form. Be sure to include all required documents listed above (proposal narrative, letters of endorsement, proposed budget—with COVID contingency budget included—using the provided template). Submission deadline: August 2, 2021 (11:59pm EDT)   https://aap.isp.msu.edu/funding/transforming-institutions-call-proposals/
    By: Madeleine Futter
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  • CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS Muslim Studies Program 15th Annual Conference
    CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS Muslim Studies Program 15th Annual Conference Michigan State University, International Center, East Lansing, MI, USA February 24-25, 2022 “Belong Nowhere”: States of Statelessness in the Muslim World Michigan State University is hosting an international conference entitled “‘Belonging Nowhere’: States of Statelessness in the Muslim World.” This conference recognizes that Muslims comprise a significant portion of the over 36 million refugee and stateless persons worldwide and seeks to understand the drivers of conflicts that lead to displacement in the Muslim world and the effects it has on Muslim communities. Further, we hope to explore avenues for advocacy for such communities, at local, regional, and global scales. Significance of theme: Several international conventions frame our understanding of and responses to statelessness and refugees. These include the 1951 Refugee Convention and its 1967 Protocol, the Convention Relating to the Status of Stateless Persons (1954) and the Convention on the Reduction of Statelessness (1961). Under these conventions, contracting states must afford displaced individuals protections and rights as any lawful alien in that country. Various other conventions and organizations have been created over the years to establish rights for stateless persons and refugees under international law. Despite these efforts, stateless individuals and refugees continue to be denied basic human rights and protections such as identity documents, employment, education, and access to health services. Stateless people continue to have no legal protection and no right to political participation, or even to advocate on their own behalf. They often lack access to education, employment, health care, registration of birth, marriage or death, and property rights. Refugees and stateless people may also encounter travel restrictions, social exclusion, and heightened vulnerability to poverty, poor health outcomes, social exclusion, sexual and physical violence, exploitation, human trafficking, forcible displacement, and an increased risk of radicalization. According to the UNHCR, statelessness and refugee status have devastating effects on the lives of at least 36 million people around the world. Of these, nearly 75% have effectively become minority groups in new lands, as is the case with, for example, Palestinians Kurds, Syrians, and Rohingya Muslims. Whole generations of Muslims are growing up disenfranchised with little to no legal protections and long-lasting political, social and psychological consequences. Panelists will be invited to discuss the causes of displacement and the consequences for individuals, states, and our increasingly global Muslim communities Conference format: The two-day conference will take place on February 24-25, 2022, and will include a networking dinner, panels, and a keynote. The precise format will be announced at a later date. Call for papers: The organizers welcome abstracts for previously unpublished research on the conference theme conceived broadly; and hope to include scholarship reflecting a range of disciplinary and interdisciplinary backgrounds—including (but not limited to) refugee studies, sociology, history, anthropology, psychology, political studies, law, and religious studies. Junior scholars and post-doctoral researchers are encouraged to submit abstracts for consideration. The deadline to apply is August 31, 2021, and accepted papers will be announced by September 30, 2021. Click here to complete the Call for Papers Form
    By: Madeleine Futter
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    UCLA African Studies Event: Africa's Readiness for Climate Change
    Please find attached a special edition of our newsletter about the upcoming Africa’s Readiness for Climate Change (ARCC) virtual forum, organized by the UCLA African Studies Center and Earth Rights Institute.    The webinar event is scheduled for April 19-23 and registration to attend is free; register at:  https://ucla.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_b5cGk3_ASFO1WEkwK2NAtA.  Exact times to be announced, but starting time will be 9 am for most days as three of the presenters will be Zooming from the continent.   Confirmed Speakers are Nnimmo Bassey, Director of the Health of Mother Earth Foundation; Ousmane Aly Pame, President Global Ecovillage Network Africa, Founder/President REDES (Network for Ecovillage Emergence and Development in the Sahel); HE Ambassador Sidique Abou-Bakarr Wai, Sierra Leone Ambassador to the US; and Elizabeth Wathuti, Founder, Green Generation Initiative and Head of Campaigns at Wangari Maathai Foundation, Kenya.   Additionally, there will be panels on Public Health, Indigenous Knowledge, Policy, and more.   For information, please email africa@international.ucla.edu or visit the conference website at https://www.international.ucla.edu/asc/article/206676 or call 323.335.9965.  
    By: Madeleine Futter
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    Announcing Journal of West African History, Volume VI, Issue II
    Founding Editor-in-Chief: Nwando AchebeEditors: Saheed Aderinto, Trevor Getz, Vincent Hiribarren, and Harry OdamttenBook Review Editors: Mark Deets and Ndubueze Mbah JWAH 6.2 NOW AVAILABLE ON JSTOR AND PROJECT MUSE! The Journal of West African History (JWAH) is an interdisciplinary peer-reviewed research journal that publishes the highest quality articles on West African history. Located at the cutting edge of new scholarship on the social, cultural, economic, and political history of West Africa, JWAH fills a representational gap by providing a forum for serious scholarship and debate on women and gender, sexuality, slavery, oral history, popular and public culture, and religion. The editorial board encourages authors to explore a wide range of topical, theoretical, methodological, and empirical perspectives in new and exciting ways. The journal is committed to rigorous thinking and analysis; is international in scope; and offers a critical intervention about knowledge production. Scholarly reviews of current books in the field appear in every issue. And the publication is in both English and French; an abstract in both languages will be provided. JWAH is published by Michigan State University Press. Editor’s Note Vincent Hiribarren, "African History Will Make Us Breathe" Articles Klas Rönnbäck, “The Built Environment of the Precolonial West African Coast: Materials, Functions, and Housing Standards” Ismail Warscheid, “The West African Jihād Movements and the Islamic Legal Literature of the Southwestern Sahara (1650–1850)” Holly Rose Ashford, “Modern Motherhood, Masculinity, and Family Planning in Ghana, 1960–75” Retrospective Jan Jansen and James R. Fairhead, “The Mande Creation Myth, by Germaine Dieterlen, as a Historical Source for the Mali Empire” Conversations Kwasi Konadu, “COVID-19 and Caution for Historians: Views from a Place in West Africa” Karen Flint, “‘Africa Isn’t a Testing Lab’: Considering COVID Vaccine Trials in a History of Biomedical Experimentation and Abuse” Alhaji U. Njai, “COVID-19 Pandemic at the Intersection of Ebola, Global Leadership, and the Opportunity to Decolonize the Political Economy of Sierra Leone” Helen Tilley, “COVID-19 across Africa: Colonial Hangovers, Racial Hierarchies, and Medical Histories” Book Reviews Harry N. K. Odamtten, Edward W. Blyden’s Intellectual Transformations: Afropublicanism, Pan-Africanism, Islam, and the Indigenous West African Church, reviewed by Tracy Keith Flemming Jonathan E. Robins, Cotton and Race across the Atlantic: Britain, Africa, and America, 1900–1920, reviewed by Andrew James Kettler Emily S. Burrill, States of Marriage: Gender, Justice, and Rights in Colonial Mali, reviewed by Harmony O’Rourke Katherine Ann Wiley, Work, Social Status, and Gender in Post-Slavery Mauritania, reviewed by Erin Pettigrew Cassandra Mark-Thiesen, Mediators, Contract Men, and Colonial Capital: Mechanized Gold Mining Colony, 1879–1909, reviewed by Andrea Ringer Submissions The editorial board invites scholars to submit original article-length manuscripts (not exceeding 10,000 words including endnotes, 35 pages in length) accompanied by an abstract that summarizes the argument and significance of the work (not exceeding 150 words). Please see submission guidelines for detailed expectations. Review essays (not exceeding 1,000 words) should engage the interpretation, meaning, or importance of an author’s argument for a wider scholarly audience. See what we have available for review on our Book Reviews page. Please contact our Book Review editors Mark Deets mark.deets@aucegypt.edu and Ndubueze Mbahndubueze@buffalo.edu for more information. Manuscripts submitted to the Journal of West African History should be submitted online athttps://ojs.msupress.msu.edu/index.php/JWAH/about/submissions. In order to submit an article, you will have to create an account. The site will guide you through this process.
    By: Madeleine Futter
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    ASA Seminar: "Emerging Schoars at Work"
    Join us for an ASA Member exclusive event entitled Emerging Scholars at Work: Bridging the Gap Between Practitioners and Scholars on March 22, 12:00pm EST/UTC-4. We’ll be joined by with Jean Claude Abeck, an ASA Emerging Scholar (Howard) and Founder of the think tank Africa Center for Strategic Progress (ACSTRAP). ACSTRAP bridges the gap between knowledge and public policy process by partnering with seasoned experts both in Africa and around the world. Zoom links to this event will be available in MyASA. Sign up to receive a reminder about this event.   To register click here
    By: Madeleine Futter
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    ASMEA Grant and Prize Opportunities
    The Association for the Study of the Middle East and Africa (ASMEA) has several opportunities available in conjunction with its Fourteenth Annual ASMEA Conference being held in Washington, D.C. November 13 – 15, 2021. To stimulate new and diverse lines of discourse about the Middle East and Africa, ASMEA will once again offer its Research Grant Program. This program seeks to support research on topics that deserve greater attention. An applicant may submit a proposal that constitutes new and original research within these five areas: minorities and women, military history, governance and economy, faith, and Iran. Grants of up to $2500 will be awarded. Learn more and apply HERE. The ASMEA Travel Grant Program provides funds primarily to Ph.D. students, post-Docs, and junior faculty studying the Middle East or Africa interested in presenting their research at the Annual ASMEA Conference. Grants of up to $750 will be awarded and may be used to cover expenses associated with attending the Annual Conference. Learn more HERE. New this year, ASMEA has announced the Bernard Lewis Prize for scholars or practitioners working on issues of antisemitism. The $2500 prize will be awarded at the Fourteenth Annual Conference. Learn more HERE. The deadline to submit a Research or Travel Grant application is April 30, 2021. The deadline to submit an application for the Bernard Lewis Prize is June 30, 2021. Questions can be directed to info@asmeascholars.org.   by Emily Lucas
    By: Madeleine Futter
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  • DesignThinkers Group Follow Up
    DesignThinkers Group USA (DTG) recently followed up on the beginning of the AAP initiative at MSU. In 2016, DTG designed a three-day co-creation workshop which helped finalize the creation of the AAP. More recently, DTG conducted two focus group discussions in Nov 2020 to better understand the AAP’s impact since its creation.      To read about DTG’s key findings and challenges for the AAP, read the link below.     https://www.designthinkersgroup.us/why-co-creation-is-important-an-alliance-for-african-partnership-case-study/.  
    By: Madeleine Futter
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    Call for Papers: Neoliberalism, Militarization and Shifting Geopolitics in Africa
    by Richard Raber   Nokoko, the journal of Carleton University’s Institute of African Studies, is preparing a special issue on the theme “Shifting Geopolitics and Militarization in Africa.” We invite abstracts for research articles addressing the issues presented below. We also welcome book reviews, and briefings from scholars, public intellectuals, and activists.    Widespread assessments within International Relations suggest a transformation is underway from the post-Cold War order characterized by American supremacy, towards a new multi-polar world. In Africa, this follows thirty years in which the Washington Consensus entrenched a liberal international order across the continent. In that time, governments rewrote constitutions to protect private property and foreign investment, diverted state expenditure from social goods, while facilitating widespread (and ongoing) privatization. Over the same period, US Africa Command (US-AFRICOM) sought hosts for US troops. The result has been a surge in US military presence across the continent, with American troops working alongside as well as training and equipping African forces. In turn, the United States gained interoperability agreements and a network of “lily pad” bases throughout Africa. This expansion occurred with little public scrutiny, and relied on regimes of legal immunity that may exceed those of colonial regimes.   There are reasons to focus beyond the US, even as the US exceeds other states in the scale and extent of its presence. Since the 2008 financial crisis, there has been a marked geopolitical recalibration in Africa. China, Russia, middle-powers, and former colonial countries have established military relations in ways reminiscent of colonial era canton systems in China and India. While unclear if troop placements reflect trade and commercial interests, China, Russia, India, Saudi Arabia, the UK, France,Canada, Italy, Japan and Turkey are present.    Meanwhile, smaller powers such as India and Saudi Arabia have emerged as major sources of arms across Africa as both Egypt and South Africa ramp up arms production with the hopes of expanding exports on the continent.  China’s formal military presence on the continent commenced with ground troops in 2011 with the aim of withdrawing its citizens during the war in Libya. Chinese arms sales to Cameroon, Congo DRC, Ghana, Sudan, Tanzania, Morocco, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Sudan, Tanzania, Zambia, and Zimbabwe increased 55% between 2013 and 2017. Algeria is the third-largest buyer of Chinese weapons after Pakistan and Bangladesh. China’s 8,000-member standby force with the UN is ready to take part inpeacekeeping, training, and operations.   Russia’s role is a fraction of China’s, yet the country signed nuclear energy deals and support agreements with the Central African and Mozambican militaries. Likewise, Russian natural gas and arms interests have built ties across the continent. In addition, Russia vies for a base in Sudan and in October 2019 held the first Russia-Africa Summit in Sochi, Russia as part of renewed efforts to bolster its influence in the continent (Mwangi and Fabiano, 2020).   For its part, Djibouti has come to host a wide range of foreign bases. Italy, France, Japan, and China, all have bases a mere 10km from the US base. Together, these bases host another seven allied forces, which begs the question of whether its strategic importance offers added stability and strength or volatility and weakness in international relations, especially given the current drift toward war in neighbouring portions of Ethiopia.   The UK, France, and Canada increased their presence under the pretext of counterterrorism. In Kenya, the UK’s (and the US) training of government troops has coincided with a massive rise in extrajudicial killings. Under UN authority, and led by French troops, forces from Burkina Faso, Chad, Mali, Mauritania, and Niger formed the Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in Mali (MINUSMA). Their objective? Prevent “terrorism” in the Sahel. In September 2019, West African governments pledged to commit a billion dollars to the effort. All this, despite the fact that known “terrorist” groups are in fact “embedded in local dynamics, and have some degree of political authority and legitimacy as they find support in criticisms of and protests over bad governance and lack of justice.” (Bruno Charbboneau, 2018)   European Union countries have ended humanitarian rescue patrols of the Mediteranean coasts and instead work to harden borders and fund the detaining of migrants in camps in North Africa. Europe’s interventions constitute a militarized response toward people who are already victims of war, thus further traumatizing them. And yet in many instances it is a militarized response to nonmilitary problems caused by failed economic policies, poor governance, ecological stresses, and persistent or growing poverty.    Several important questions stem from the presence of foreign militaries in Africa. How much does militarization relate to the economic and strategic interests of the intervening countries, of what Padraig Carmody termed “The New Scramble for Africa” (2016)? Might Africa again be a site of proxy wars—a conclusion suggested by the wars in the Sudans? What are the implications for governance and security forces within Africa? How do foreign troops support or constrain civil society and counter-hegemonic forces in Africa? How does their presence impact military and police cultures within host states?   For example, in Kenya and beyond, extrajudicial killings rose and a culture of impunity emerged among national forces, leaving local police to often appear as occupying forces themselves. This is certainly consistent with the recent, heroic, and historically unparallelled opposition to SARS forces in Nigeria. In Ghana, the enormous levels of military aid from the US, UK and EU donors has made the army a privileged institution. The military has wide business interests —including a bank and arms industry— and allows senior officers and “VIPs” of their choosing to use sirens and escorts to push luxury SUVs through local traffic, adding one more burden on regular citizens suffering inadequate infrastructure.    Of course, the expansion of foreign military involvement in Africa does not result in unidirectional dynamics, raising the question as to how African leaders respond and fashion state policies? What are the benefits to playing different countries off one another in collaborative arrangements, aid agreements and procurement contracts? Similarly, in light of shifting geopolitical dynamics, how have local coalitions responded? What kinds of local opposition and protest movements emerge, and what are their successes or failures? Similarly, what political changes are occurring within the African Union?    How do outside interventions exacerbate existing tensions within and between countries? In which ways do such interventions give life to new forms of class structure, class alliances and class struggle? What is the relationship between class structure and alliances to the distribution of natural resource wealth? What are their interactions with shifts elsewhere (e.g., the Caribbean and Latin America)? How does this transformation refract larger historical shifts? How do sites of intervention illuminate a new order and the re-calibration of power in Africa (and beyond)? What are the impacts of rhetorical efforts to build new alliances of African countries with BRICS and other rising powers?   We welcome research articles on the above topic any of the following sub-themes: Militarization and natural resources Militarization and strategic positioning, e.g. Indian Ocean, Somalia, Egypt, Algeria, and Sudan Militaries, popular struggles, and training of police and military for civil unrest Occupation forces such as in Western Sahara, Diego Garcia, and foreign military bases Migration and militarization Borders, borderlands, and changing notions of space and place Militaries and humanitarianism Militaries and gender violence Militaries and popular culture Surveillance and constitutional rights Contemporary military infrastructures Weaponization of the media Militias, mercenaries, paramilitaries, and the privatization of violence Militaries and indirect rule Militaries and ethnicity The business of war Flows of military aid Africa’s position in the arms industry Race, Gender, Imperial Knowledge and the afterlives of Empire in International Relations theory Shifting relations of power between and within African states Scholars whose abstracts are approved by the editors will be required to submit papers that critically engage with any number of these issues. Submissions should be no longer than 9,000 words. We also welcome shorter contributions as well as photo essays. Articles should follow Nokoko’s submission guidelines. We encourage potential authors to discuss articles in progress if they seek advice on preparing a successful submission. Please contact us if you wish to propose a particular book for review(s) and we will assist in finding a review copy. Book reviews have a 1000 word limit, although extended book reviews of two or more books may be longer (see, for example, the extended review by Heffernan in Issue 7). Policy briefings and agitations for new research agendas are welcome in the range of 4000 words. We also continue to accept articles outside this theme-specific area.   To submit use this link:  https://carleton.ca/africanstudies/research/nokoko/call-for-papers-nokoko/
    By: Madeleine Futter
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    Webinar: Graduate School Application and Experience in North America and Europe-Lagos Studies Assoc.
    Webinars will be held October, 3, 10, 17, and 24 hosted by the Lagos Studies Association At its annual Conference, the Lagos Studies Association organizes workshops on graduate school application and experience in North America and Europe, featuring graduate school faculty and students. Unfortunately, COVID-19 pandemic did not allow the conference to hold this year. We are happy to hold these events via Zoom Webinars on October 3, 10, 17, and 24. See full schedule below.   Graduate School Application and Experience in North America: Perspectives from Graduate Students   Date: October 10 Time: 5-7pm (Nigeria Time)   Panelists Chair: Tosin Gbogi (Marquette University/African Literature and Popular Culture)   Discussants Ayodeji Adegbite (University of Wisconsin-Madison) Samuel Kehinde Adesubokan (University of Victoria) Esther Ajayi-Lowo (Texas Woman’s University) Omoyemi Ajisebutu (Northwestern University) Theophilus Okunlola (University of Wisconsin-Madison) Yolanda Osondu (University of Calgary)   Topics for discussion include but not limited to the following: • Preparing for the Graduate Record Examination • Taking the Test of English as Foreign Language/Navigating waiver • Choosing graduate program and writing statement of purpose • Coursework, qualifying exam, and reading concentration • Adjusting to a new academic culture • Conducting fieldwork and sourcing for external funding • Writing your dissertation and preparing for the job market   Please click the link below to join the webinar: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86544791933?pwd=aXBuaC9zNVNnOHM0WnNIWnpyWURYZz09 Webinar ID: 865 4479 1933 Passcode: 990616 Also via LSA Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/groups/205111409881162     ----------     Graduate School Application and Experience in Europe: Perspectives from Graduate School Faculty   Date: Oct. 17 Time: 5-7pm (Nigeria Time)     Panelists Panel Chair: Oliver Coates (University of Cambridge/History)   Discussants Shola Adenekan (University of Amsterdam/African Literature and New Media) Simidele Dosekun (London School of Economics and Political Science/Feminist Studies) Emilie Guitard (French National Center for Scientific Research/Anthropology) Steven Pierce (University of Manchester/History) Dmitri van den Bersselaar (Leipzig University /History)     Topics for discussion include but not limited to the following: • Things to consider when picking graduate program • Contacting prospective supervisors: Dos and Don’ts • What admission committees look for in application dossier • Writing competitive PhD proposal • Funding for graduate education   Please click the link below to join the webinar: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83891051455?pwd=aG8zeEwydWUvT0NScEFtOEluQjBLUT09 Webinar ID: 838 9105 1455 Passcode: 787421 Also via LSA Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/groups/205111409881162     ----------   Graduate School Application and Experience in Europe: Perspectives from Graduate Students     Date: Oct. 24 Time: 5-7pm (Nigeria Time)     Panelists   Panel Chair:  Peter Oderinde (University of Basel)   Discussants Daniel Chukwuemeka (University of Bristol) Tolulope Ilesanmi (University of Basel) Jammie Titilayo (Technische Universität Darmstadt) Seun Williams (The Graduate School of International and Development Studies)     Topics for discussion include but not limited to the following: • Things to consider when picking graduate program • Contacting prospective supervisors: Dos and Don’ts • What admission committees look for in application dossier • Writing competitive PhD proposal • Funding for graduate education   Please click the link below to join the webinar: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85076855946?pwd=R2MvV3RzR2RIN0NGTkp3UndXVVpiZz09 Webinar ID: 850 7685 5946 Passcode: 848810 Also via LSA Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/groups/205111409881162  
    By: Amy Jamison
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