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    CfP: Religion, Literacies, and English Education in Global Dialogue
    Call for papers for: English Teaching: Practice & Critique   Submission deadline: 15th August 2021 Guest Editors (listed alphabetically by last name):  Denise Dávila Mary M. Juzwik (lead editor) Robert Jean LeBlanc Eric Rackley Loukia K. Sarroub    Overview of special issue  Religion continues to be an important part of global life in the 21st century, as it has been in centuries past. While the Eurocentric “secularization thesis” of the mid 20th century predicted its decline in sociocultural life as nation-states and their economies developed, religion and spirituality have not faded from the global scene. Indeed, they continue to significantly shape (and be shaped by) culture and politics as well as on our focal interests in this special issue -- language, literacy, and schooling. In educational settings around the globe, students today grapple with tensions arising as they navigate academic, social, and spiritual life worlds. Literacy educators also face numerous challenges in understanding and enacting their roles and responsibilities in relation to often-contested terrain surrounding religion, spirituality, and literacies and language/ing in schools. From a scholarly standpoint, understanding and unpacking tensions, underlying assumptions, and influences of the religious in the lives of young people and teachers across diverse educational spaces is becoming increasingly important in today’s interconnected and rapidly changing world. As scholars have begun to turn attention to issues of religion and spirituality, much of the extant work has focused on clearly defined fields of study, on bounded religious communities, and on case studies of individual students. Some of these boundaries are beginning to blur as language and literacy scholars theorize new relationships, examine emergent religious phenomena in relation to literacy, and begin to take more seriously the role of the religious across students’ and teachers’ lives, experiences, communities, geographical locations, etc.  Global in scope, this special issue invites diverse perspectives on religion, literacy, and English education and seeks to invite them into dialogue with each other. While conversations around various intersections of religion, literacy, and English education have provided generative insights for English education and literacy scholarship, this special issue aims to stimulate a broader global dialogue across faiths, disciplines, and communities. We invite papers developing theory, reporting empirical work, narrating pedagogies, and expanding educators’ repertoires of instructional practice. We invite epistemological, ontological, and theological consideration of the religious in relation to language/ing, literacies, and English education. By cultivating a global dialogue about religion, literacy, and English education, this special issue is uniquely situated to generate new understandings across religious and educational traditions from around the world. This special issue aims to create a forum in which stakeholders will wrestle with boundary-crossings among areas of study that hold the promise of reimagined global possibilities in education.  In keeping with our theme, we are particularly interested in contributions from scholars studying religion/literacy/English education in connection with and across locales beyond the United States, including those foregrounding transnational perspectives. Because such work is relatively rare among US-based language and literacy researchers, we also invite papers from scholars working in related fields (e.g., anthropology, linguistics, religious studies, etc.) who take an interest in the intersections of language, literacy, learning, and the religious. We invite manuscripts that address urgent questions and topics related to the new frontiers in religious practice, English, and literacy, including: Religion, spirituality, and English teacher education Digital faith and religious literacy practices Motivations, practices, and ideologies shaping the reading of religious texts English education in schools Preparation of literacy educators with global religious knowledge and understanding Gender, sexuality, and religious literacies Insider/outsider perspectives on conducting research in religious communities Transnationalism and ethno-religious global movements Rising global ethno-nationalism and religious movements and their impact on literacy teaching and learning Historical legacies of Christianity, White Supremacy, and anti-Black racism in relation to literacy education in US contexts Relations among imagined religious communities, literacies, and schooling Conceptions of the ‘good’ in religious literate traditions Tensions in conducting literacy research in and across religious communities Communities troubling or disrupting existing research conceptions of religion and/in literacies Challenges to existing theories of religion and/in literacies Religion and spirituality in relation to  equity issues confronting language, literacy, and English education Emergent religious phenomena in relation to literacy studies Other relevant topics We will consider submission of research papers, practitioner narratives, conceptual/theoretical essays, and creative work pertinent to the theme. Submission Details   Please see the ETPC “Author Guidelines” for guidelines on both kinds of submissions, including word limits: https://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/journal/etpc#author-guidelines Submissions for this Special Issue must be made through the ScholarOne online submission and peer review system. When submitting your manuscript please ensure the correct special issue title is selected from the drop down menu on page 4 of the submission process: https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/etpc    For questions, contact Dr. Denise Dávila (ddavila@utexas.edu), Dr. Mary Juzwik (mmjuzwik@msu.edu), Dr. Robert LeBlanc (robert.leblanc@uleth.ca), Dr. Eric Rackley (eric.rackley@byuh.edu), or Dr. Loukia Sarroub (lsarroub@unl.edu). Submission deadline: August 15, 2021   Publication date: Approximately June 2022
    By: Madeleine Futter
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    UCLA African Studies Event: Africa's Readiness for Climate Change
    Please find attached a special edition of our newsletter about the upcoming Africa’s Readiness for Climate Change (ARCC) virtual forum, organized by the UCLA African Studies Center and Earth Rights Institute.    The webinar event is scheduled for April 19-23 and registration to attend is free; register at:  https://ucla.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_b5cGk3_ASFO1WEkwK2NAtA.  Exact times to be announced, but starting time will be 9 am for most days as three of the presenters will be Zooming from the continent.   Confirmed Speakers are Nnimmo Bassey, Director of the Health of Mother Earth Foundation; Ousmane Aly Pame, President Global Ecovillage Network Africa, Founder/President REDES (Network for Ecovillage Emergence and Development in the Sahel); HE Ambassador Sidique Abou-Bakarr Wai, Sierra Leone Ambassador to the US; and Elizabeth Wathuti, Founder, Green Generation Initiative and Head of Campaigns at Wangari Maathai Foundation, Kenya.   Additionally, there will be panels on Public Health, Indigenous Knowledge, Policy, and more.   For information, please email africa@international.ucla.edu or visit the conference website at https://www.international.ucla.edu/asc/article/206676 or call 323.335.9965.  
    By: Madeleine Futter
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    Announcing Journal of West African History, Volume VI, Issue II
    Founding Editor-in-Chief: Nwando AchebeEditors: Saheed Aderinto, Trevor Getz, Vincent Hiribarren, and Harry OdamttenBook Review Editors: Mark Deets and Ndubueze Mbah JWAH 6.2 NOW AVAILABLE ON JSTOR AND PROJECT MUSE! The Journal of West African History (JWAH) is an interdisciplinary peer-reviewed research journal that publishes the highest quality articles on West African history. Located at the cutting edge of new scholarship on the social, cultural, economic, and political history of West Africa, JWAH fills a representational gap by providing a forum for serious scholarship and debate on women and gender, sexuality, slavery, oral history, popular and public culture, and religion. The editorial board encourages authors to explore a wide range of topical, theoretical, methodological, and empirical perspectives in new and exciting ways. The journal is committed to rigorous thinking and analysis; is international in scope; and offers a critical intervention about knowledge production. Scholarly reviews of current books in the field appear in every issue. And the publication is in both English and French; an abstract in both languages will be provided. JWAH is published by Michigan State University Press. Editor’s Note Vincent Hiribarren, "African History Will Make Us Breathe" Articles Klas Rönnbäck, “The Built Environment of the Precolonial West African Coast: Materials, Functions, and Housing Standards” Ismail Warscheid, “The West African Jihād Movements and the Islamic Legal Literature of the Southwestern Sahara (1650–1850)” Holly Rose Ashford, “Modern Motherhood, Masculinity, and Family Planning in Ghana, 1960–75” Retrospective Jan Jansen and James R. Fairhead, “The Mande Creation Myth, by Germaine Dieterlen, as a Historical Source for the Mali Empire” Conversations Kwasi Konadu, “COVID-19 and Caution for Historians: Views from a Place in West Africa” Karen Flint, “‘Africa Isn’t a Testing Lab’: Considering COVID Vaccine Trials in a History of Biomedical Experimentation and Abuse” Alhaji U. Njai, “COVID-19 Pandemic at the Intersection of Ebola, Global Leadership, and the Opportunity to Decolonize the Political Economy of Sierra Leone” Helen Tilley, “COVID-19 across Africa: Colonial Hangovers, Racial Hierarchies, and Medical Histories” Book Reviews Harry N. K. Odamtten, Edward W. Blyden’s Intellectual Transformations: Afropublicanism, Pan-Africanism, Islam, and the Indigenous West African Church, reviewed by Tracy Keith Flemming Jonathan E. Robins, Cotton and Race across the Atlantic: Britain, Africa, and America, 1900–1920, reviewed by Andrew James Kettler Emily S. Burrill, States of Marriage: Gender, Justice, and Rights in Colonial Mali, reviewed by Harmony O’Rourke Katherine Ann Wiley, Work, Social Status, and Gender in Post-Slavery Mauritania, reviewed by Erin Pettigrew Cassandra Mark-Thiesen, Mediators, Contract Men, and Colonial Capital: Mechanized Gold Mining Colony, 1879–1909, reviewed by Andrea Ringer Submissions The editorial board invites scholars to submit original article-length manuscripts (not exceeding 10,000 words including endnotes, 35 pages in length) accompanied by an abstract that summarizes the argument and significance of the work (not exceeding 150 words). Please see submission guidelines for detailed expectations. Review essays (not exceeding 1,000 words) should engage the interpretation, meaning, or importance of an author’s argument for a wider scholarly audience. See what we have available for review on our Book Reviews page. Please contact our Book Review editors Mark Deets mark.deets@aucegypt.edu and Ndubueze Mbahndubueze@buffalo.edu for more information. Manuscripts submitted to the Journal of West African History should be submitted online athttps://ojs.msupress.msu.edu/index.php/JWAH/about/submissions. In order to submit an article, you will have to create an account. The site will guide you through this process.
    By: Madeleine Futter
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    ASMEA Grant and Prize Opportunities
    The Association for the Study of the Middle East and Africa (ASMEA) has several opportunities available in conjunction with its Fourteenth Annual ASMEA Conference being held in Washington, D.C. November 13 – 15, 2021. To stimulate new and diverse lines of discourse about the Middle East and Africa, ASMEA will once again offer its Research Grant Program. This program seeks to support research on topics that deserve greater attention. An applicant may submit a proposal that constitutes new and original research within these five areas: minorities and women, military history, governance and economy, faith, and Iran. Grants of up to $2500 will be awarded. Learn more and apply HERE. The ASMEA Travel Grant Program provides funds primarily to Ph.D. students, post-Docs, and junior faculty studying the Middle East or Africa interested in presenting their research at the Annual ASMEA Conference. Grants of up to $750 will be awarded and may be used to cover expenses associated with attending the Annual Conference. Learn more HERE. New this year, ASMEA has announced the Bernard Lewis Prize for scholars or practitioners working on issues of antisemitism. The $2500 prize will be awarded at the Fourteenth Annual Conference. Learn more HERE. The deadline to submit a Research or Travel Grant application is April 30, 2021. The deadline to submit an application for the Bernard Lewis Prize is June 30, 2021. Questions can be directed to info@asmeascholars.org.   by Emily Lucas
    By: Madeleine Futter
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  • Africa Past and Present Podcast: African Sports Studies (ep 30)
    Check out this podcast from Matrix: the Center for Digital Humanities and Social Sciences and the Department of Hisotry at MSU!   "In this episode, Dr. Gerard Akindes discusses his experience playing and coaching basketball in West Africa and Europe, and evaluates the prospects of the new Basketball Africa League. He considers the role of "electronic colonialism" in a changing sport media landscape and then reflects on his work advancing African scholarship through research publications and through Sports Africa, a coordinate organization of the U.S. African Studies Association that he co-founded in 2004."   Here is the link: https://urldefense.com/v3/__http:/afripod.aodl.org__;!!HXCxUKc!hObxORTy0n-bBMe5kVD4_jKz5Dofcp-uVBmltNqs7GdwfilTm7c19FREo-3gvmKNhw$   This podcast can also be found on Apple podcast and similar outlets. 
    By: Madeleine Futter
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    Call for Papers: Neoliberalism, Militarization and Shifting Geopolitics in Africa
    by Richard Raber   Nokoko, the journal of Carleton University’s Institute of African Studies, is preparing a special issue on the theme “Shifting Geopolitics and Militarization in Africa.” We invite abstracts for research articles addressing the issues presented below. We also welcome book reviews, and briefings from scholars, public intellectuals, and activists.    Widespread assessments within International Relations suggest a transformation is underway from the post-Cold War order characterized by American supremacy, towards a new multi-polar world. In Africa, this follows thirty years in which the Washington Consensus entrenched a liberal international order across the continent. In that time, governments rewrote constitutions to protect private property and foreign investment, diverted state expenditure from social goods, while facilitating widespread (and ongoing) privatization. Over the same period, US Africa Command (US-AFRICOM) sought hosts for US troops. The result has been a surge in US military presence across the continent, with American troops working alongside as well as training and equipping African forces. In turn, the United States gained interoperability agreements and a network of “lily pad” bases throughout Africa. This expansion occurred with little public scrutiny, and relied on regimes of legal immunity that may exceed those of colonial regimes.   There are reasons to focus beyond the US, even as the US exceeds other states in the scale and extent of its presence. Since the 2008 financial crisis, there has been a marked geopolitical recalibration in Africa. China, Russia, middle-powers, and former colonial countries have established military relations in ways reminiscent of colonial era canton systems in China and India. While unclear if troop placements reflect trade and commercial interests, China, Russia, India, Saudi Arabia, the UK, France,Canada, Italy, Japan and Turkey are present.    Meanwhile, smaller powers such as India and Saudi Arabia have emerged as major sources of arms across Africa as both Egypt and South Africa ramp up arms production with the hopes of expanding exports on the continent.  China’s formal military presence on the continent commenced with ground troops in 2011 with the aim of withdrawing its citizens during the war in Libya. Chinese arms sales to Cameroon, Congo DRC, Ghana, Sudan, Tanzania, Morocco, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Sudan, Tanzania, Zambia, and Zimbabwe increased 55% between 2013 and 2017. Algeria is the third-largest buyer of Chinese weapons after Pakistan and Bangladesh. China’s 8,000-member standby force with the UN is ready to take part inpeacekeeping, training, and operations.   Russia’s role is a fraction of China’s, yet the country signed nuclear energy deals and support agreements with the Central African and Mozambican militaries. Likewise, Russian natural gas and arms interests have built ties across the continent. In addition, Russia vies for a base in Sudan and in October 2019 held the first Russia-Africa Summit in Sochi, Russia as part of renewed efforts to bolster its influence in the continent (Mwangi and Fabiano, 2020).   For its part, Djibouti has come to host a wide range of foreign bases. Italy, France, Japan, and China, all have bases a mere 10km from the US base. Together, these bases host another seven allied forces, which begs the question of whether its strategic importance offers added stability and strength or volatility and weakness in international relations, especially given the current drift toward war in neighbouring portions of Ethiopia.   The UK, France, and Canada increased their presence under the pretext of counterterrorism. In Kenya, the UK’s (and the US) training of government troops has coincided with a massive rise in extrajudicial killings. Under UN authority, and led by French troops, forces from Burkina Faso, Chad, Mali, Mauritania, and Niger formed the Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in Mali (MINUSMA). Their objective? Prevent “terrorism” in the Sahel. In September 2019, West African governments pledged to commit a billion dollars to the effort. All this, despite the fact that known “terrorist” groups are in fact “embedded in local dynamics, and have some degree of political authority and legitimacy as they find support in criticisms of and protests over bad governance and lack of justice.” (Bruno Charbboneau, 2018)   European Union countries have ended humanitarian rescue patrols of the Mediteranean coasts and instead work to harden borders and fund the detaining of migrants in camps in North Africa. Europe’s interventions constitute a militarized response toward people who are already victims of war, thus further traumatizing them. And yet in many instances it is a militarized response to nonmilitary problems caused by failed economic policies, poor governance, ecological stresses, and persistent or growing poverty.    Several important questions stem from the presence of foreign militaries in Africa. How much does militarization relate to the economic and strategic interests of the intervening countries, of what Padraig Carmody termed “The New Scramble for Africa” (2016)? Might Africa again be a site of proxy wars—a conclusion suggested by the wars in the Sudans? What are the implications for governance and security forces within Africa? How do foreign troops support or constrain civil society and counter-hegemonic forces in Africa? How does their presence impact military and police cultures within host states?   For example, in Kenya and beyond, extrajudicial killings rose and a culture of impunity emerged among national forces, leaving local police to often appear as occupying forces themselves. This is certainly consistent with the recent, heroic, and historically unparallelled opposition to SARS forces in Nigeria. In Ghana, the enormous levels of military aid from the US, UK and EU donors has made the army a privileged institution. The military has wide business interests —including a bank and arms industry— and allows senior officers and “VIPs” of their choosing to use sirens and escorts to push luxury SUVs through local traffic, adding one more burden on regular citizens suffering inadequate infrastructure.    Of course, the expansion of foreign military involvement in Africa does not result in unidirectional dynamics, raising the question as to how African leaders respond and fashion state policies? What are the benefits to playing different countries off one another in collaborative arrangements, aid agreements and procurement contracts? Similarly, in light of shifting geopolitical dynamics, how have local coalitions responded? What kinds of local opposition and protest movements emerge, and what are their successes or failures? Similarly, what political changes are occurring within the African Union?    How do outside interventions exacerbate existing tensions within and between countries? In which ways do such interventions give life to new forms of class structure, class alliances and class struggle? What is the relationship between class structure and alliances to the distribution of natural resource wealth? What are their interactions with shifts elsewhere (e.g., the Caribbean and Latin America)? How does this transformation refract larger historical shifts? How do sites of intervention illuminate a new order and the re-calibration of power in Africa (and beyond)? What are the impacts of rhetorical efforts to build new alliances of African countries with BRICS and other rising powers?   We welcome research articles on the above topic any of the following sub-themes: Militarization and natural resources Militarization and strategic positioning, e.g. Indian Ocean, Somalia, Egypt, Algeria, and Sudan Militaries, popular struggles, and training of police and military for civil unrest Occupation forces such as in Western Sahara, Diego Garcia, and foreign military bases Migration and militarization Borders, borderlands, and changing notions of space and place Militaries and humanitarianism Militaries and gender violence Militaries and popular culture Surveillance and constitutional rights Contemporary military infrastructures Weaponization of the media Militias, mercenaries, paramilitaries, and the privatization of violence Militaries and indirect rule Militaries and ethnicity The business of war Flows of military aid Africa’s position in the arms industry Race, Gender, Imperial Knowledge and the afterlives of Empire in International Relations theory Shifting relations of power between and within African states Scholars whose abstracts are approved by the editors will be required to submit papers that critically engage with any number of these issues. Submissions should be no longer than 9,000 words. We also welcome shorter contributions as well as photo essays. Articles should follow Nokoko’s submission guidelines. We encourage potential authors to discuss articles in progress if they seek advice on preparing a successful submission. Please contact us if you wish to propose a particular book for review(s) and we will assist in finding a review copy. Book reviews have a 1000 word limit, although extended book reviews of two or more books may be longer (see, for example, the extended review by Heffernan in Issue 7). Policy briefings and agitations for new research agendas are welcome in the range of 4000 words. We also continue to accept articles outside this theme-specific area.   To submit use this link:  https://carleton.ca/africanstudies/research/nokoko/call-for-papers-nokoko/
    By: Madeleine Futter
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  • U.S. Embassy Bamako Public Diplomacy Annual Program Statement
    PAS Bamako invites proposals for projects that strengthen ties between the United States and Mali by highlighting shared values and promoting bilateral cooperation. All programs must advance one of the key priorities listed below, promote an element of American culture, or have a connection with American expert/s, organization/s, or institution/s in a specific field that will promote increased ties between the United States and Mali and foster understanding of U.S. policies and perspectives.   More information about the funding opportunity can be found here.
    By: Derek Tobias
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    Governing the Pandemic in Large Cities: From the BRICS and Beyond
    The African Cities and Internationalization Group hosted by the African Center for the Studies of the US presents Governing the Pandemic in Large Cities: From the BRICS and Beyond     Date: 22-23 October 2020 Time: 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM Johannesburg Time
    By: Elaina Lawrence
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    Africa's rapid economic transformation
    Check out this article co-authored by Thom Jayne, Adesoji Adelaja, and one of AAP's co-directors, Richard Mkandawire.   The article provides a powerful message of hope for Africa. In spite of wars, famine and poverty they argue that Africa has made major strides in living standards, there is clearly a new generation that provide promise for the transformation of the continent. The underlying message is that they have in the making a cadre of African entrepreneurs that are delinking from the past.   Click on the link below to read more:   https://www.rural21.com/english/current-issue/detail/article/africas-rapid-economic-transformation.html
    By: Elaina Lawrence
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    AAU Virtual African Academic Diasporic Homecoming Side Event
    On 29 September at 12:30 PM EDT, the AAP, will be hosting a side event webinar on "Building women research leaders from African Institutions – Sharing perspectives" during the Association of African Universities Diaspora Conference.   The event will be moderated by one of our very own co-directors, Dr. Jose Jackson-Malete, and she will be joined by panelists: - Professor Ama de-Graft Aikins, British Academy Global Professor, Institute of Advanced Studies, UCL - Professor Barnabas Nawangwe, Vice Chancellor of Makerere University - Ms. Millicent L. Liani, DELTAS PhD Fellow, Center for Capacity Research at LSTM - Dr. Welore Tamboura, Lecturer from Université des Lettres et des Sciences Humaines de Bamako   Click on the link below to register:   https://msu.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_oHfxIxvZRFK4igInnmb8jw?fbclid=IwAR3E-EEjSk-O0pPKUNrhIRtrLz4q2MIhSK1DAi09NkO1nPek7_ATvAT2af4
    By: Elaina Lawrence
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  • ANNOUNCEMENT African Critical Inquiry Programme Workshop: Call for Applications
    ACIP Workshops are intended as annual occasions to identify and address critical themes, fundamental questions and pressing practical issues concerning public culture. For instance, Workshops might focus on particular notions and issues related to publics, visuality, museums and exhibitions, art, performance, representational or institutional forms from methodological, practical, and theoretical vantages. They might examine forms and practices of public scholarship and the theories, histories and systems of thought that shape and illuminate public culture and public scholarship. Workshops should encourage comparative, interdisciplinary and cross-institutional interchange and reflection that brings into conversation public scholarship in Africa, creative cultural production, and critical theory. Workshop budgets will vary depending on proposed plans; the maximum award is ZAR 60,000.   https://africanstudies.org/asa-news/january-2015-asa-news/african-critical-inquiry-programme-workshop-call-for-applications/">https://africanstudies.org/asa-news/january-2015-asa-news/african-critical-inquiry-programme-workshop-call-for-applications/ 
    By: Amy Jamison
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