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Agri Food Systems


  • Using Digital Finance to Promote Women’s Economic Empowerment in Agriculture
    Digital financial services have the potential to positively affect women’s economic empowerment, despite limitations that restrict their access to and use of financial resources and services. Building on the Digital Finance and Women’s Economic Empowerment in Beyond Production Roles in Agriculture and Food Systems report published by the Feed the Future Advancing Women’s Empowerment Program, this webinar will invite participants to learn about promoting women’s economic empowerment in agriculture using digital financial services.  Presenters will share out the findings, conclusions, and recommendations from the report, highlighting through a fireside chat the lessons learned and best practices from implementers and service providers working in the DFS space, and provide time for participants to pose questions to the presenters.    To learn more/Register: Using Digital Finance to Promote Women’s Economic Empowerment in Agriculture | Agrilinks
    By: Raquel Acosta
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    AGRILINKS EVENT: Managing Soils to Address Global Challenges
    Join us for the 2022 USAID Bureau for Resilience and Food Security (USAID/RFS) Research Honorary Lecture, given by 2020 World Food Prize Laureate Rattan Lal. Dr. Lal is recognized globally as a pioneer in soil-centric agricultural management to improve food security and develop climate-resilient agriculture through soil carbon sequestration, sustainable intensification, use efficiency of agroecosystems, sustainable management of soils, and soil health. His career in soil science and international agricultural research spans over 5 decades and four continents.   The lecture and discussion will outline global challenges including food and nutritional insecurity, climate change, soil degradation, water scarcity, and pollution. This presentation will also highlight Dr. Lal’s modeling research for achieving sustainable and resilient production systems to restore soil health. The strategy involves producing more from less and returning land back to nature.    To register: https://primetime.bluejeans.com/a2m/register/sgghvjcz
    By: Raquel Acosta
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  • Legume Systems Grant Writers Workshop and Seed Grant Competition
    The USAID Feed the Future Legume Systems Innovation Lab at Michigan State University is pleased to announce the Legume Systems Grant Writers Workshop and Seed Grant Competition.   This unique opportunity will combine a grant writing workshop followed by a proposal writing competition. A total of six seed grants ($5,000 each) will be rewarded for research in any aspect of the legume value chin specific to cowpea, pigeon pea, or common bean for work in any of the following countries: Benin, Burkina Faso, Ghana, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Nigeria, Nigeria, Senegal, and Zambia. Application and concept note deadline is February 28, 2022. The goal of this event is to build the grant writing and science communication skills of partner country researchers.   See attached flyer for more details.
    By: Raquel Acosta
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    Call for Papers: Livestock as Global and Imperial Commodities
    Livestock as Global and Imperial Commodities: Economies, Ecologies and Knowledge Regimes, c. 1500 – present Annual Commodities of Empire International Workshop, Freie Universität Berlin, 14-15 July 2022 Livestock has played a crucial role in imperial politics, economies and societies over the past centuries. The expansion of animal raising often went hand in hand with settler colonialist land expropriation, and various animals were in many places crucial to colonial conquest and exploitation. Moreover, livestock and livestock commodities, such as meat, wool, hides and tallow were traded and consumed within and across boundaries, both imperial and non-imperial. Such commodification processes not only relied on settler livestock frontiers, but also on the transformation of indigenous livestock economies, knowledge regimes and local ecologies. They were closely tied to the global expansion of capitalism and, as such, also affected non-colonial and post-imperial spaces across the world in many similar, yet sometimes also diverging ways. However, compared to agricultural cash crops and minerals, imperial and global histories of livestock are still quite rare. This workshop addresses this important research gap. It aims to explore the different (political, economic, societal, cultural, religious, ecological and scientific) dimensions of livestock production and commodification in global and imperial history.   We broadly define livestock as domesticated animals that are raised for multiple purposes, most notably for their labour (draft, pack, riding and powering machinery); their skin, hair, horns, shells, feathers, etc. (for clothing or ornaments); their meat, milk and eggs (for nutritional purposes); their manure (as fertilizer or fuel); their body parts (for medicinal purposes); their monetary value (for barter, savings and marriage payments); or their symbolic value (for religious uses, punishments and displays of prestige). Our definition includes cattle, water buffaloes, yaks, reindeer, sheep, goats, pigs, camels, elephants, horses, mules, donkeys, llamas, alpacas, poultry and ostriches, and we would also welcome papers on (shell)fish farming. Yet, we would exclude wild animals that are hunted, exhibited and/or subjected to conservationist measures. These will be addressed in a second workshop in 2023.   Potential paper topics may relate to: ·     the politics of livestock production: colonial control over land and/or pastoralist societies, local/imperial food security, capitalist expansion, international organisations such as FAO, etc. ·     modes of livestock raising: nomadic, semi-nomadic and settled pastoralism and mixed farming, large-scale ranching, industrial animal farming, ownership by international corporations, etc. ·     social conditions and effects of livestock production: social stratification, gender, race, caste, religious, and ethnic roles, changing labour forms and relations, (legal) regimes of land and livestock ownership, etc. ·     environmental consequences: deforestation, formation of grasslands, soil erosion, (water) pollution, global warming through methane emissions, etc. ·     veterinary, agricultural and environmental knowledge and technologies: (non-)circulation of knowledge, conflicting knowledge regimes and actors, scientific institutions and practices such as experimental stations, cross-breeding and selective breeding techniques, practices of disease control, etc. ·     processing of livestock commodities: slaughterhouses, processing of hides, wool and dairy, techniques for dried, salted, canned, frozen and chilled meat, etc. ·     trading infrastructures and networks: transport technologies, ports, trade companies, credit mechanisms, etc. ·     livestock labour: transport, warfare, role in agriculture, forestry and mining for the production of other (global) commodities such as  sugar, teak or silver, etc. ·     local, imperial and global uses of livestock commodities: for food, clothing, fertilizer, medicine, payments, etc.   We are interested in cases from all geographical regions and in approaches from various disciplines. In addition to historians, we welcome papers from anthropologists, sociologists, veterinary scientists, zoologists, environmentalists and other scholars working on the global and imperial history of livestock and livestock commodities.   This two-day workshop is a collaborative venture between the Commodities of Empire British Academy Research Project and the Commodifying Cattle Research Project funded by the German Research Foundation at the Free University Berlin. Following the long-standing practice of Commodities of Empire workshops, papers will be grouped in thematic panels, pre-circulated to all workshop participants, and panel discussions will be opened by a chair or discussant. Paper-givers will then have the possibility to reply succinctly, and this will be followed by open discussion. Papers presented at the workshop may be considered for publication in the Commodities of Empire Working Papers series: https://commoditiesofempire.org.uk/publications/working-papers/. We strongly encourage graduate students and other early career scholars to propose papers. Costs of accommodation in and, within certain limits, travel to Berlin will be covered. We have special funding for scholars coming from the Global South. Please note, however, that while we aim to hold the workshop on site at the Free University Berlin, we might have to hold the workshop virtually, or in a hybrid form, depending on the evolution of the Covid-19 pandemic and the (travel) restrictions it entails.   Please e-mail expressions of interest, with a title and an abstract of no more than 300 words, by 31 January 2022 to Samuël Coghe, Free University Berlin, samuel.coghe@fu-berlin.de. We will notify authors about the acceptance of their papers by 15 March 2022. They will then be asked to submit a draft paper of approx. 5,000-6,000 words (not counting footnotes and bibliography) 3 weeks prior to the event.
    By: Raquel Acosta
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    USAID Administrator Samantha Power: A New Vision for Global Development
    USAID Administrator Samantha Power delivers remarks outlining a bold vision for the future of the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and inclusive development around the world. The speech takes place as USAID celebrates its 60th anniversary. Administrator Samantha Power's remarks will be followed by a conversation with 2020 USAID Payne Fellow Katryna Mahoney
    By: Derek Tobias
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    Conservation, Food, & Health Foundation Grant
    The Conservation, Food and Health Foundation seeks to protect natural resources, improve the production and distribution of food, and promote public health in Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East.  The foundation helps build the capacity of organizations and coalitions with grants that support research or improve the learning and generation of local solutions to complex problems.   The foundation supports projects that demonstrate local leadership and promote professional development in the conservation, agricultural, and health sciences; develop the capacity of local organizations; and address a particular problem or question in the field.  It prefers to support projects that address under-funded issues and geographic areas. The foundation supports special projects and programs of non-governmental organizations in three areas: conservation, food, and health. Examples of areas of interest within these fields follow, but are not meant to be exclusive.   Conservation Conservation grants help improve ecological and environmental conditions in low- and middle-income countries.  The foundation supports field research and related research activities, training, and technical assistance efforts that: help conserve ecosystems and protect biodiversity train local leaders in conservation and protection of resources, with an emphasis on technical and scientific training Food Food grants help research-based efforts to improve food and nutrition security and improve natural resources and ecosystems.  Areas of interest include projects that: promote or develop specific sustainable agriculture practices with potential to advance science and practice in other countries; test and refine innovative education and training interventions for small scale farmers; and advance new approaches to control pests and diseases affecting important food crops in low-income countries. Health The foundation supports public health programs that focus on populations rather than individuals.  It funds programs that emphasize disease prevention and health promotion over those that emphasize disease diagnosis, treatment, and care.  It supports research, technical assistance, and training projects that: improve public health through community-based efforts that address health promotion, disease prevention, family planning, and reproductive health; and increase the understanding and treatment of neglected tropical diseases The foundation supports most types of non-governmental organizations that can provide evidence of their nongovernmental status or charitable purpose. In general, the foundation will support: Non-governmental organizations (NGO) Nonprofit organizations Civil society organizations Community-based organizations Colleges, universities and academic institutions The foundation does not support businesses, government agencies,  humanitarian aid organizations, other foundations or churches.   For more information or to apply isit the CFH Foundation website.
    By: Derek Tobias
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    Virtual Panel Discussion
    AP is excited to be hosting a virtual panel discussion regarding “The Role of Youth in Building Resilient Agri-Food Systems in Africa” this Thursday, October 21st at 8:30am-10:00 EDT. This discussion will be hosted with the help of The World Food Prize Foundation. The session will discuss evidence-based and pragmatic approaches that could foster productive youth engagements supportive of resilient agri-food systems in Africa. A panel of experts drawn from MSU and AAP partner institutions, Foundations and youth leaders will share insights highlighting the relevance of the agri-food system to youth livelihoods, the role youth could play to foster a resilient agri-food system, and salient trends, barriers and promising entry points for policy that could equip African youth with the skills, space and resources to effectively contribute to a productive and resilient agri-food system. Building a sustained and resilient agri-food system in Africa is an intergenerational mandate which demands the active engagement of African youth, and AAP is proud to be a part of this progress.   This side event is organized by Michigan State University’s Alliance for African Partnership under the auspices of the African Youth Transformation Platform, a collaborative and cross-disciplinary platform that seeks to transform the lives of African youth and their communities through research, capacity building, and advocacy that enhances youth development outcomes.   To register/learn more: https://msu.zoom.us/.../register/WN_iguFgRtBTYyhZi8hiZaCmA
    By: Raquel Acosta
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  • USAID Feed The Future (FTF): Promoting Innovative and Resilient Agriculture Market Systems (PREMIER)
    USAID Feed The Future (FTF): Promoting Innovative and Resilient Agriculture Market Systems (PREMIER) program, a project to stimulate systemic change by addressing the root causes of poor agriculture system performance, targeting leverage points for catalytic change and working through market actors to facilitate technical and financial assistance to broaden and deepen market engagement, thus increasing incomes and creating employment opportunities, especially for youth and women.   This project will support producers and SMEs in agriculture to increase their profitability, access to markets and financial services using a market systems development approach, while increasing their resilience to climate change along the Nacala Corridor, which is located across Nampula Province in northern Mozambique, and stretches into northern Zambezia, southern Niassa, and southwestern Cabo Delgado provinces.   For more information or to apply visit the grants.gov website.
    By: Derek Tobias
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  • Farm credit giving Omoro and Amuru women farmers a lifeline
    OMORO – Dero-she capital, a local community-based organization (CBO) is helping more than 170 rural women in Amuru and Omoro districts to profitably engage in agriculture by extending farm credit to them.   Instead of cash, the organization gives farmers credit in form of services like ploughing and inputs or farm implements like seeds and hand hoes.   Innocent Piloya, the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of Dero-she capital told theCooperator that most times, rural women have agribusiness ideas but lack support to implement them.   “What we do is lend them support like hire a tractor to plough land for them, give them seeds and hand hoes to engage in farming. We also help them look for market for the crops. We then recover the money after they have sold off their harvest,” Piloya said. “Our organization does not give actual credit to the farmers because the money can end up being diverted elsewhere once received. Much as a farmer may want a hoe or seeds, they might have more urgent needs like transport or treatment so they could end up using the money for a different purpose,” she explained.   Piloya explained further that, before the farm credit is extended to the women, they are trained on good agronomic practices and business skills to help them transform from subsistence to commercial farming before they are given the farm credit.   Continue reading on The Cooperator News website
    By: Derek Tobias
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  • Agri4D 2021 conference "Food Systems for New Realities"
    The Agri4D 2021 conference "Food Systems for New Realities" will take place at SLU (virtually) on 28-30 September. The Agri4D conference has been Organised by SLU Global at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU) and the Swedish International Agriculture Network Initiative (SIANI), with support from the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (Sida). Agri4D will bring together researchers, policy makers and practitioners to engage actively with the challenges of food systems with a focus on low-income contexts in a globalised world. The conference aims to be a platform to take stock of the current knowledge frontier, connect science to policymaking and practice, and spark new collaborations.     For more information please visit: https://www.slu.se/en/collaboration/international/slu-global/agri4d-conference/.      To register:   Agri4D - Agricultural Research for Development Conference 2021 (akademikonferens.se) 
    By: Raquel Acosta
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  • 2021 Africa Agriculture Status Report
    AAP would like to highlight MSU Assistant Professor and Coordinator of the AAP/GYAN Youth Transformation Platform Kwame Yeboah’s recent collaboration with colleagues from @Making Cents International and the @Bureau of Integrated Rural Development at the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Ghana, to author Chapter 8 of the report: "Capturing the Synergies Between Youth Livelihoods and Resilient Agri-food Systems". During this meeting, Kwame Yeboah and AAP partners discussed many issues facing agri-food system development in Africa. Some of these topics included:    Building sustained and resilient agri-food systems in Africa.  The impacts of youth livelihoods in Africa that are intricately intertwined with the performance of the agri-food systems.  How to foster youth engagement.  Address policies that facilitate youth access to productive resources.  Harnessing youth potential for resilient agri-food systems.  AAP recognizes the significance of the Africa Agricultural Status Report and continues to share our support for Assistant Professor Kwame Yeboah’s work on these vital topics. 
    By: Raquel Acosta
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  • The Milken-Motsepe Prize in AgriTech
    The inaugural Milken-Motsepe Prize focuses on accelerating progress towards Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) 1 and 2: no poverty and zero hunger. The Milken-Motsepe Prize in AgriTech is a global competition for innovative solutions to increase economic value to farmers, from seed to sale. Registration is open to anyone.Winning teams will increase net economic value to small and medium-sized farms by: Developing innovative technology solutions for any stage of the food system, from seed to sale Designing a viable business model Increasing farm productivity and/or decreasing post-harvest loss Registration is free and open to anyone, with a $1 million grand prize available for the winning team, and $1 million in additional prizes.     For more information or to apply, please visit the Milken-Motsepe Prize webpage.
    By: Derek Tobias
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