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Youth Empowerment

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    FRIDA's 8th grant cycle
    Applications from young feminist groups from all majority countries to apply. More information is here.
    By: Rajalakshmi Nadadur Kannan
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    Young African Leaders Programme
    The Young African Leadership Programme funded by the European Commission is a tailor-made fellowship and training programme aiming at catalysing and fostering changes as envisioned in the Africa Agenda 2063 and in the Africa-EU Partnership. After a pilot cohort in Autumn 2021, the second cohort of Young African Leaders is expected in Florence in September 2022   The Young African Leaders Programme is a fellowship scheme that provides a unique opportunity for policy experts from Africa (all regions) to further develop their policy work and professional and leadership skills amidst international experts.   Furthermore, the Programme aims at creating new networks, connecting a strong cohort of leaders committed to driving change in their own countries and across the continent, as well as address the gender gaps and foster inclusivity in leadership roles.   In the dynamic academic environment of the European University Institute (EUI) in Florence, selected participants will take part in workshops, training and skills development sessions, conferences, and study visits in Europe. Interaction with the other fellows, policymakers and the academic community at the EUI will make this a truly unforgettable experience. The structure of the Programme will be as follows: Executive Training Seminars on thematic issues; Professional Development Workshops, providing a set of leadership skills, tools and concrete case studies; Study Visits to EU institutions, relevant academia, and international organisations Final individual written assignment Award of the YALP certificate of attendance Connection to network of scholars and practitioners knowledgeable in relevant transnational governance The three-month leadership programme takes place from the 1 September 2022 to the 30 November 2022. Fellowships are fully-funded with a grant of € 2,500 per month. The selected African fellows must live in the area of Florence for the duration of their stay. The language of the Programme is English. Where possible, the STG will seek to integrate French. The Programme has an intensive training schedule, and is therefore a full-time and fully-funded fellowship scheme.     Who should apply? The Programme targets mid-career, high potential policy-makers, diplomats, and professionals from Africa, working in national and local authorities, regional, continental, international organisations and development partners, civil society organisations, academia, media and private sector, in Africa. More precisely, the Programme is open to professionals (M/F/X), mid-career and executives alike, who are nationals of African countries, residing in Africa and are up to the age of 35.   This Programme is supported by the European Commission, Directorate-General for International Partnerships. This Call for applications is launched under a suspension clause, related to the final approval of the financing decision of the Programme by the European Commission. According to such clause, should not the financing decision be taken, the EUI/STG reserve the right to cancel the call without any prejudice to the Institute and potential beneficiaries.   This programme is supported by the Directorate-General for International Partnerships of the European Commission. For enquiries about applications please vist: Young African Leaders Programme • European University Institute (eui.eu)    Or contact: apply.fellowships.stg@eui.eu
    By: Raquel Acosta
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    Please join us this Tuesday 15th March 2022 at 4pm EAT, 8am EST as we launch our new project on Diversity and Inclusion in leadership and training.
    By: Raymond Musiima
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    A Turn to the African Girl: (Re)Defining African Girlhood Studies
    Over the last century, girls, long ignored as sources of knowledge, have engaged in activism and creative endeavors to express their visions and aspirations for a future society inclusive of their needs. In the last decade a flourishing of girls’ creative agency and incisive voices has given rise to growing and vibrant scholarship on girlhoods and their politics, histories, economics, arts, and cultures. The establishment of Girlhood Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal in 2008 encouraged scholars to take girls’ lived experiences more seriously.   Girlhood studies provides a critical means to counter the historical tendency of feminist scholarship to center adult women and marginalize or even ignore girls. While recent scholarship has shifted from focusing on girls as largely vulnerable and in need of protection, most of the research has been about girlhood in the Global North. Notable exceptions include studies that highlight the resilience and agency of African girls (Moletsane et al. 2021; Mitchell and Moletsane 2018). Additionally, research on girlhoods by Corrie Decker (2010), Abosede George (2014), Sadiyya Haffejee et al. (2020), Jen Katshunga (2019), and Heather Switzer (2018) reflects a range of approaches that move beyond the focus on precarity in Africa. Ensuring that girls are seen to be knowers and narrators of their own stories is essential. In this issue we aim to bring together a diverse group of scholars in contributions that will analyze critically and present creatively the experiences and agency of girls and young women in Africa and its diasporas.           The focus here will be on the voices of girls in Africa and, more specifically, on how girls as active agents inform our understandings of girlhood and how colonial and post-colonial interventions have shaped and re-defined African girlhood through pseudo-scientific developmental models that were introduced to the continent via missionary education systems that have continued, largely, to operate in the twenty-first century. While contributions might examine how African girls negotiate cultural, gendered, racialized, and/or sexualized identities shaped by underlying issues of African self-determination, genocide, slavery, migration policies, violence, and colonialism we seek contributions that center girls’ perspectives, resistance, resilience, and innovation even in the midst of precarity and vulnerability. By turning questions about empowerment away from how we empower girls to those about how societies, institutions, and families can support the ways in which girls have empowered themselves and address the ways in which they have been ignored, we can better understand and deal with issues related to African girls in the twenty-first century.               Contributors to this special issue could address the need to theorize girlhoods across the vast geographies of Africa and problematize how these have been constructed and deployed as the justification for development interventions and anti-poverty alleviation programs. We are particularly interested in analyses engaging different feminisms and Afro-Indigenous studies as well as queer and trans studies, theories, and methods. Authors are invited to examine embodied, political, and conceptual artifacts produced by girls and young women living in Africa. Comparative studies are welcome as are individual case studies that highlight historical and locationally specific processes and events. We welcome contributions authored by young people who identify as girls. The following questions, among others, may be addressed. How can we problematize the very category of girl as a deeply colonial heteropatriarchal    construct? How do colonial politics of deservedness and biopolitics function to position African girls as targets of state violence? What influence have African girls had on policy or programs and to what extent have they been mere targets and objects of such policies and programs? Which methodologies enable or enhance girls’ participation in research and community (or institutional) development? What kinds of adaptive regimes, practices, and policies do African states deploy and how do these have an impact on girls’ bio-autonomy and shape their relationships with issues of subject formation, nationhood, violence, justice, and solidarity? What does disrupting the white, able, heteronormative categories of girlhood mean for analyses of girlhood and for queer, trans, and gender-fluid lives? What creative, grassroots, decolonizing, resurgent strategies have young women living in African countries taken up and with what outcomes Guest Editors This special issue is to be edited by Catherine Cymone Fourshey, Marla Jaksch, and Relebohile Moletsane. Please direct enquiries to africangirlhoods@gmail.com   Catherine Cymone Fourshey is an Associate Professor in History and International Relations at Bucknell University. Marla Jaksch is Professor and Barbara Meyers Pelson Chair in Faculty-Student Engagement/ Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at The College of New Jersey Relebohile Moletsane is Professor and John Langalibalele Dube Chair in Rural Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal.   Article Submission Abstracts are due by 15 March 2022 and should be sent to africangirlhoods@gmail.com Full manuscripts are due by 15 July 2022. Authors should provide a cover page giving brief biographical details (up to 100 words), institutional affiliation(s) and full contact information, including an email address. Articles may be no longer than 6,500 words including the abstract (up to 125 words), keywords (6 to 8 in alphabetical order with no duplication of words from the title), notes, captions, tables, and acknowledgements (if any), biographical details (taken from the cover page), and references. Images in a text count for 200 words each. Girlhood Studies, following Berghahn’s preferred house style, uses a modified Chicago Style. See http://journals.berghahnbooks.com/_uploads/ghs/girlhood-studies_style_guide.pdf If images are used, authors are expected to secure the copyright themselves and they are expected to follow IRB protocols and ethical research standards regarding girls and young women as subjects.   References Decker, Corrie 2010. “Reading, Writing, and Respectability: How Schoolgirls Developed Modern Literacies in Colonial Zanzibar.” International Journal of African Historical Studies 43(1): 89–114. George, Abosede A. 2014. Making Modern Girls: A History of Girlhood, Labor, and Social Development in Colonial Lagos. Athens, OH: Ohio University Press. Haffejee, Sadiyya, Astrid Treffry-Goatley, Lisa Wiebesiek, and Nkonzo Mkhize. 2020. “Negotiating Girl-led Advocacy: Addressing Early and Forced Marriage in South Africa.” Girlhood Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal 13 (2): 18–34. Kashunga, Jen. 2019. “Contesting Black Girlhood(s) beyond Northern Borders: Exploring a Black African Girl Approach.” In The Black Girlhood Studies Collection, ed. Aria S. Halliday, 45–79. Toronto, CA.: Women’s Press. Mitchell, Claudia, and Relebohile Moletsane 2018. Disrupting Shameful Legacies: Girls and Young Women Speak Back through the Arts to Address Sexual Violence. Leiden, NL: Brill Sense. Moletsane, Relebohile, Lisa Wiebesiek, Astrid Treffry-Goatley, and April Mandrona 2021. Ethical Practice in Participatory Visual Research with Girls: Transnational Approaches. New York, NY: Berghahn Books. Switzer, Heather D. 2018. When the Light is Fire: Maasai Schoolgirls in Contemporary Kenya. Champaign, IL: University of Illinois Press. Contact Info:  Catherine Cymone Fourshey is an Associate Professor in History and International Relations at Bucknell University. Marla Jaksch is Professor and Barbara Meyers Pelson Chair in Faculty-Student Engagement/ Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at The College of New Jersey Relebohile Moletsane is Professor and John Langalibalele Dube Chair in Rural Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal. Contact Email:  africangirlhoods@gmail.com URL:  https://journals.berghahnbooks.com/_uploads/ghs/GHS_cfp_AfricanGHS.pdf
    By: Raquel Acosta
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    U.S. Mission in Uganda Public Affairs Annual Program Statement
    The U.S. Mission in Uganda’s Public Affairs Office is pleased to announce that funding is available through the Public Diplomacy Grant Program for projects ranging in value from $5,000 to $40,000. Projects for greater values will be considered on a case-by-case basis.    Grants are intended for committed and organized civil-society organizations, local representatives of civil society, think tanks, non-governmental organizations, cultural institutions, and academic institutions. Awards to individuals will also be considered on a case-by-case basis. All grantees must have a non-profit status.    Notice: For Fiscal Year 2022 all proposals submitted in response to this Annual Program Statement must include a contingency plan describing how the proposed activity would be implemented in the event that COVID-19 related health restrictions are in place during the anticipated period of performance.    Objectives and Project Outcomes:  The objectives of the Public Diplomacy Grant Program are to promote positive relations between the people of Uganda and the United States; reinforce shared values; and connect high potential Ugandan youth and young professionals (aged 16 to 35) as well as established professional leaders to the American people through projects that:  Help Ugandan youth aged 16 – 35, especially young women, explore and discover their potential through innovative science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) programs, as well as entrepreneurship programs.  Encourage Ugandan youth aged 16 – 35 to participate in civic life through social entrepreneurship, volunteerism, and community engagement.  Strengthen understanding of U.S. values and institutions; highlight U.S. culture, including American Studies; and support diversity, inclusion, and equality.  Utilize the power of the arts to promote positive self-expression, social change, and economic opportunity among Ugandan youth aged 16 – 35.  Equip emerging community leaders (e.g., sports coaches, arts instructors, and cultural professionals) aged 22 – 35 with the skills and knowledge necessary to grow their organizations or to enhance their engagement with youth audiences.  Promote the development and application of new technologies and innovative solutions to economic, environmental, and social challenges. Projects could connect U.S. technology or public policy experts with Ugandan peers or foster the application of American technology and innovations to address challenges in Ugandan communities.  Support civil society organizations (CSOs) in developing a vibrant and prosperous democratic society through programs that strengthen NGO management, enhance the skills of early to mid-career NGO/CSO professionals, strengthen networks between NGO/CSO professionals in the United States and Uganda, or demonstrate to the public the positive role CSOs play in advancing a prosperous, healthy, and informed society.    To learn more: https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=336894
    By: Raquel Acosta
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    DRL FY2021: Global Equality Fund LGBTQI+ Programs in Africa
    The U.S. Department of State, Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor (DRL) invites civil society organizations (CSOs) to submit applications for projects that provide lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and intersex (LGBTQI+) communities with the tools to empower local movements and communities, prevent, mitigate, and recover from violence, discrimination, stigma, and human rights abuses, promote full social inclusion, or address critical issues of justice.  Projects should be focused on one or more of the following regions: West Africa, Central Africa, the Middle East and North Africa, South and Central Asia, and East Asia. We intend for projects to be led by, or have strong support from and participation by, LGBTQI+ organizations and communities.   Successful proposals will be funded by the resources of the Global Equality Fund, a public-private partnership including the governments of Argentina, Australia, Canada, Chile, Croatia, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Iceland, Italy, Montenegro, the Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, Uruguay and the United States, as well as the Arcus Foundation, the John D. Evans Foundation, FRI: the Norwegian Organization for Sexual and Gender Diversity, the M·A·C AIDS Fund, Deloitte LLP, the Royal Bank of Canada, Hilton, Bloomberg LP, Thomson Reuters Foundation TrustLaw Initiative, Human Rights Campaign, and Out Leadership.   The overall goal of these funds is to advance the human rights of persons who face discrimination, violence, or abuse on account of their real or perceived sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, or sex characteristics in West Africa, Central Africa, Middle East and North Africa, South and Central Asia, and East Asia.  DRL will consider proposals for regional or single country programs.  Regional programming should be conducted in multiple target countries, as it is appropriate and safe to do so.   To learn more: https://www.state.gov/drl-fy2021-global-equality-fund-lgbtqi-programs-in-west-africa-central-africa-the-middle-east-and-north-africa-south-and-central-asia-and-east-asia/ https://www.state.gov/drl-fy2021-global-equality-fund-lgbtqi-programs-in-west-africa-central-africa-the-middle-east-and-north-africa-south-and-central-asia-and-east-asia/
    By: Raquel Acosta
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  • Please join us on the U.S Mission Uganda Facebook page Tuesday 1st February 2022 5 pm EAT and 9 am EST as we launch our Ecourse4 project. See ya!
    By: Raymond Musiima
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    U.S. Mission in Uganda Public Affairs Annual Program Statement
    The U.S. Mission in Uganda’s Public Affairs Office is pleased to announce that funding is available through the Public Diplomacy Grant Program for projects ranging in value from $5,000 to $40,000. Projects for greater values will be considered on a case-by-case basis.    Grants are intended for committed and organized civil-society organizations, local representatives of civil society, think tanks, non-governmental organizations, cultural institutions, and academic institutions. Awards to individuals will also be considered on a case-by-case basis. All grantees must have a non-profit status.    Notice: For Fiscal Year 2022 all proposals submitted in response to this Annual Program Statement must include a contingency plan describing how the proposed activity would be implemented in the event that COVID-19 related health restrictions are in place during the anticipated period of performance.    Objectives and Project Outcomes:  The objectives of the Public Diplomacy Grant Program are to promote positive relations between the people of Uganda and the United States; reinforce shared values; and connect high potential Ugandan youth and young professionals (aged 16 to 35) as well as established professional leaders to the American people through projects that:  Help Ugandan youth aged 16 – 35, especially young women, explore and discover their potential through innovative science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) programs, as well as entrepreneurship programs.  Encourage Ugandan youth aged 16 – 35 to participate in civic life through social entrepreneurship, volunteerism, and community engagement.  Strengthen understanding of U.S. values and institutions; highlight U.S. culture, including American Studies; and support diversity, inclusion, and equality.  Utilize the power of the arts to promote positive self-expression, social change, and economic opportunity among Ugandan youth aged 16 – 35.  Equip emerging community leaders (e.g., sports coaches, arts instructors, and cultural professionals) aged 22 – 35 with the skills and knowledge necessary to grow their organizations or to enhance their engagement with youth audiences.  Promote the development and application of new technologies and innovative solutions to economic, environmental, and social challenges. Projects could connect U.S. technology or public policy experts with Ugandan peers or foster the application of American technology and innovations to address challenges in Ugandan communities.  Support civil society organizations (CSOs) in developing a vibrant and prosperous democratic society through programs that strengthen NGO management, enhance the skills of early to mid-career NGO/CSO professionals, strengthen networks between NGO/CSO professionals in the United States and Uganda, or demonstrate to the public the positive role CSOs play in advancing a prosperous, healthy, and informed society.      U.S. Content  In order to be eligible for funding consideration, proposals must demonstrate significant U.S. content.  U.S. content can include, for example, the substantial participation of U.S. experts or alumni of U.S. government exchange programs, partnership with U.S. organizations or educational institutions, the involvement of U.S. companies present in Uganda, the application or adaptation of U.S. models and best practices, or learning materials related to American history, society, culture, government, or institutions. Initiatives that promote sustained cooperation between the people of the United States and Uganda even after program funding has concluded are encouraged.  Proposals without significant U.S. content will not be considered for funding.    Activities that are typically funded include, but are not limited to:  Programs that reinforce and amplify lessons learned by alumni of State Department-funded exchange programs (both American and Ugandan alumni);  Youth engagement and leadership programs;  Workshops, seminars, trainings, and master classes on American themes or issues of mutual interest mentioned in the above goals of the Program;  Programs to empower young women;  Radio, television, and social media training and programming in support of the above program objectives;  Programs designed as a partnership between a Ugandan and U.S. organization;  Initiatives in support of the above program objectives that make creative use of the Mission’s American Center in Kampala or Nile Explorer bus, a mobile classroom that provides extracurricular learning opportunities in STEM and other subjects through visits to underserved communities across Uganda.    Activities that are not typically funded include, but are not limited to:  Social welfare, community development, or vocational skilling projects,  Fees and travel costs to attend conferences in the United States,  Ongoing salary costs and office equipment,  Paying to complete activities begun with other funds,  Projects that are inherently political in nature or that contain the appearance of partisanship/support to individual or single party electoral campaigns,  Political party activities,  Projects that support specific religious activities,  Trade activities; fundraising campaigns; commercial projects; scientific research; construction projects; or projects whose primary aim is the institutional development of the organization itself.  For more information or to apply, please visit grants.gov
    By: Derek Tobias
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  • Happy #Internationalday for Persons with disabilities. Today MFAI has signed a 2 year MoU with Grassroot Strategies Africa (GSA). GSA is a registered youth-led not-for-profit organization in Uganda whose mission is to engage, inspire, and empower young people, women, and persons with disabilities to break barriers that hinder their participation in development processes. ViVA #MFAI-#GSA
    By: Raymond Musiima
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    USAID Administrator Samantha Power: A New Vision for Global Development
    USAID Administrator Samantha Power delivers remarks outlining a bold vision for the future of the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and inclusive development around the world. The speech takes place as USAID celebrates its 60th anniversary. Administrator Samantha Power's remarks will be followed by a conversation with 2020 USAID Payne Fellow Katryna Mahoney
    By: Derek Tobias
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    Virtual Panel Discussion
    AP is excited to be hosting a virtual panel discussion regarding “The Role of Youth in Building Resilient Agri-Food Systems in Africa” this Thursday, October 21st at 8:30am-10:00 EDT. This discussion will be hosted with the help of The World Food Prize Foundation. The session will discuss evidence-based and pragmatic approaches that could foster productive youth engagements supportive of resilient agri-food systems in Africa. A panel of experts drawn from MSU and AAP partner institutions, Foundations and youth leaders will share insights highlighting the relevance of the agri-food system to youth livelihoods, the role youth could play to foster a resilient agri-food system, and salient trends, barriers and promising entry points for policy that could equip African youth with the skills, space and resources to effectively contribute to a productive and resilient agri-food system. Building a sustained and resilient agri-food system in Africa is an intergenerational mandate which demands the active engagement of African youth, and AAP is proud to be a part of this progress.   This side event is organized by Michigan State University’s Alliance for African Partnership under the auspices of the African Youth Transformation Platform, a collaborative and cross-disciplinary platform that seeks to transform the lives of African youth and their communities through research, capacity building, and advocacy that enhances youth development outcomes.   To register/learn more: https://msu.zoom.us/.../register/WN_iguFgRtBTYyhZi8hiZaCmA
    By: Raquel Acosta
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  • SUPPORT TO YOUTH DEVELOPMENT AND EMPOWERMENT TO BECOME SELF RELIENCE.
    most of the youth in northern uganda were affected by the 20 years war led by lord resistant army. currently youth have gone back to settle and become productive but they are being hindered by inadiquate knowledge and high cost of production. this has made most of thye youth most especially young girls to get pregnant as well as being at high risk of contracting HIV/AIDS. most ladies have resulted to selling sex to earn aliving for their young kids and boys has resulted to taking scopion and marajwana. in the vision, this youth can still be transform and become productive through providing hand on skills like, hair dressing trainning, tailoring, mechanics and cake production etc. most of the youth are longing to get the skills but they cannot afford the cost of paying tiution.  in this partenship, acquiring machine like sawing machine from donation. the organisation do have space,few staff that can provide trhe training.
    By: ODUR MOSES
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