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Water, Energy, And The Environment

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    Conservation, Food, & Health Foundation Grant
    The Conservation, Food and Health Foundation seeks to protect natural resources, improve the production and distribution of food, and promote public health in Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East.  The foundation helps build the capacity of organizations and coalitions with grants that support research or improve the learning and generation of local solutions to complex problems.   The foundation supports projects that demonstrate local leadership and promote professional development in the conservation, agricultural, and health sciences; develop the capacity of local organizations; and address a particular problem or question in the field.  It prefers to support projects that address under-funded issues and geographic areas. The foundation supports special projects and programs of non-governmental organizations in three areas: conservation, food, and health. Examples of areas of interest within these fields follow, but are not meant to be exclusive.   Conservation Conservation grants help improve ecological and environmental conditions in low- and middle-income countries.  The foundation supports field research and related research activities, training, and technical assistance efforts that: help conserve ecosystems and protect biodiversity train local leaders in conservation and protection of resources, with an emphasis on technical and scientific training Food Food grants help research-based efforts to improve food and nutrition security and improve natural resources and ecosystems.  Areas of interest include projects that: promote or develop specific sustainable agriculture practices with potential to advance science and practice in other countries; test and refine innovative education and training interventions for small scale farmers; and advance new approaches to control pests and diseases affecting important food crops in low-income countries. Health The foundation supports public health programs that focus on populations rather than individuals.  It funds programs that emphasize disease prevention and health promotion over those that emphasize disease diagnosis, treatment, and care.  It supports research, technical assistance, and training projects that: improve public health through community-based efforts that address health promotion, disease prevention, family planning, and reproductive health; and increase the understanding and treatment of neglected tropical diseases The foundation supports most types of non-governmental organizations that can provide evidence of their nongovernmental status or charitable purpose. In general, the foundation will support: Non-governmental organizations (NGO) Nonprofit organizations Civil society organizations Community-based organizations Colleges, universities and academic institutions The foundation does not support businesses, government agencies,  humanitarian aid organizations, other foundations or churches.   For more information or to apply isit the CFH Foundation website.
    By: Derek Tobias
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  • Biodiversity Media Grants 2021
    Many of the threats currently facing global biodiversity have been exacerbated during the Covid-19 pandemic. Funding for critical conservation and ecotourism projects has been redirected or lost, economic growth has been prioritized over protecting wild spaces, and media coverage of the outbreak has dwarfed reporting on conservation. Indeed, the biodiversity crisis is one that impacts all of humanity and has not received the media coverage that it deserves. Media organizations and reporters have an important part to play in raising public awareness of biodiversity and conservation issues, and highlighting potential solutions to these problems.   As a part of the Earth Journalism Network’s Biodiversity Media Initiative project, we are pleased to announce a second round of grant opportunities for journalist networks, media organizations, civil society organizations or academic institutions that are working to improve media coverage of biodiversity and conservation issues in countries where information is most under threat and most urgently needed.   The Biodiversity Media Grants will support projects that:   Build the capacity of journalism networks and media organizations to report on biodiversity and conservation issues   Carry out biodiversity and/or conservation training activities for journalists   Build internal capacity   Organize local networks around these issues   We are especially interested in projects that focus on conservation in biodiversity-rich regions of the world, such as the Amazon, Central Africa and Southeast Asia.     For more information on the funding opportunity or to apply, visit the Earth Journalism Network website
    By: Derek Tobias
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    Edward O. Wilson Biodiversity Postdoctoral Fellowship
    Through a generous founding gift from Edward O. Wilson, Faculty-Curator Emeritus and University Research Professor Emeritus, and with support from additional donors, the Museum of Comparative Zoology (MCZ) at Harvard University has established the E.O. Wilson Postdoctoral Fellowship Program. This program supports postdoctoral researchers at MCZ to pursue the discovery and formal taxonomic description of Earth’s animal species. Fellows will work under the supervision of one or more MCZ faculty-curators, who will provide office space, access to lab facilities and necessary research support. The program aims to achieve broad taxonomic coverage and is not restricted to any particular taxon.  Learn about the recipients of the Edward O. Wilson Biodiversity Postdoctoral Fellowship and the species described during their fellowship. Eligibility  A Ph.D. with relevant research experience in taxonomy and/or systematics is required. All formal requirements for the doctoral degree must be completed before the start of the fellowship, though degree receipt may be forthcoming. The EOW fellowship program is open to both U.S. and non-U.S. citizens. Applicants need to identify at least one faculty-curator who has agreed to supervise the fellowship. Criteria for selection Applications will be evaluated by a committee of Harvard faculty who will prioritize the following in the selection process: The likelihood that the proposed work will result in the discovery and formal taxonomic description of animal species new to science. Fully developed and well thought out research programs with significance of proposed research clearly highlighted.  The use of integrative methodologies that combine several data types in crafting solutions to taxonomic problems. A strong academic record of taxonomic/systemics research. Additional considerations Preference will be given to applicants not currently affiliated with Harvard University, and to those who have received their doctoral degree within the previous three years. In order to encourage a diversity of expertise within the MCZ, preference will be given to individuals studying taxonomic groups not currently under investigation by an active EOW Fellow (please refer to the list of active fellows). At this time, the selection committee will not consider proposals emphasizing the taxonomy and systematics of fossil/extinct species. Terms & Conditions Stipend of $55,000/year Benefits-eligible Research and travel allowance of $4,000/year Start date flexible, but within 12 months of extended fellowship offer Maximum two-year appointment, with funding for year 2 contingent upon successful performance during year 1 Residence in the Cambridge area is required Relocation allowance negotiable after fellowship awarded Application Components  A cover letter no longer than one page. A research proposal, no longer than four pages and single-spaced, should describe: the nature and scope of the proposed research project; the approach and methods to be employed; how existing MCZ collections would be utilized and augmented with new specimens; laboratory and equipment requirements; the proposed MCZ faculty-curator sponsor, and likely products (publications, etc.) to be completed by the end of the fellowship period. Research budget: Include a simple, one-page budget that itemizes anticipated research and travel costs, not to exceed the fellowship allowance. A curriculum vitae no longer than three pages. Up to five pertinent publications. Three letters of recommendation from non-Harvard scientists. Include names and contact information of the three referees with the application. The letters will be submitted separately from the application through an online system (see below). Letters are due within two weeks follwing the application deadline. The application is complete only when all three letters are received. Interview: A subset of applicants may be asked to further discuss their proposals with the selection committee via videoconference. Submission through Harvard Academic Recruiting Information eSystem (ARieS) Deadline September 30, 2021 Questions Please email inquiries regarding the Edward O. Wilson Biodiversity Postdoctoral Fellowship
    By: Madeleine Futter
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    Discretionary Funding Initiative (DFI)
    The Discretionary Funding Initiative (DFI), funded by the Michigan State University Foundation, provides bridge funds for tenure stream faculty for additional studies needed for resubmission of an unsuccessful, but nearly fundable, grant application to the same program within a funding agency.  To request funding from this program, faculty should submit a proposal via the grant proposal system. Applicants will be expected to provide copies of their previous external reviews, if applicable, and describe the work that will be completed to address the comments provided in those documents. The research associate dean of the applicant's college (lead college if appointed in multiple colleges) will review applications, and submit a prioritized list to the Office for Research and Innovation (OR&I). Requests for support approved by the research associate deans will be reviewed by the OR&I. The maximum award from OR&I will be $25K and will require a 100% (up to $25K) match from units or colleges. Funds will be available for 18 months.   For more information or to apply, click here.
    By: Derek Tobias
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  • Scaling Sustainability and Resilience of Community Conservancies in Northern Rangelands and Coastal
    The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) is seeking concept paper applications for an assistance type of award mechanism from qualified entities to implement the Scaling Sustainability and Resilience of Community Conservancies in Northern Rangelands and Coastal Ecosystems of Kenya program. Eligibility for this award is not restricted.   USAID intends to fund one or multiple awards to maximize development impact and efficient resource use by engaging in new, or expanding existing, partnerships in priority areas identified in the program description. The program intends to adopt and scale innovative solutions in meeting the identified development challenges. USAID/Kenya and East Africa (USAID/KEA) intends to award to the applicant(s) who best meets the objectives of this funding opportunity based on the merit review criteria described in this NFO, subject to a risk assessment. Eligible parties interested in submitting applications are encouraged to read this NFO thoroughly to understand the type of program sought, application submission requirements and selection process.   This NFO will follow a 3-phase process: Phase 1: Submission of Concept Paper Phase 2: Participation in Co-creation Workshop – for pre-selected successful applicant(s) Phase 3: Submission of Full Application   More information on the funding opportunity can be found on on the grants.gov website
    By: Derek Tobias
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    Nice to be back
    By: Obinna Anyanwu chidi
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  • Effective Pathways to Africa's Agricultural Transformation
    Wednesday, August 4, 20219:30 am –11:00 am ETOnline only   Register: https://primetime.bluejeans.com/a2m/register/qbakxxyw   Agriculture is Africa's primary gateway out of hunger and poverty; the sector employs 65 - 70 percent of Africa's labor force while supporting the livelihoods of 90 percent of the population. However, for the sector to lead the path to the desired food security and superior incomes for Africa, it is imperative that conversations and investments are made towards transforming the continent's agricultural work into a profitable and sustainable enterprise. The urgency of this transformation has been made clear during the COVID-19 pandemic, where the continent has been forced to re-think its food production and distribution systems. The closure of borders, lockdowns and limitations of movement indicated the need for Africa to develop homegrown solutions for its staple food needs and market development. It is against this backdrop that this webinar is held as a session to define the investments needed for a vibrant and functional agricultural sector that can deliver sufficient food and nutrition supplies for all as well as exciting farmer incomes. The conversation will address the roles of individual stakeholders, partnerships and leadership in building an inclusive agricultural transformation across the continent. The webinar will also define the role of public sector commitment in transforming the agriculture sector, with notable examples from successes in Rwanda. Similarly, the critical position of private sector participation shall be highlighted as supported by the transformative role of this group in uplifting Ghana's food systems. This session is facilitated by the Alliance for a Green Revolution on Africa (AGRA), an African-led and Africa-based organization currently leading the pursuit of an agricultural transformation through investments in systems development, policy and state capability, and partnerships. This webinar will feature special opening remarks from Dr. Agnes Kalibata, UN Secretary-General’s Special Envoy to the 2021 Food Systems Summit. 
    By: Madeleine Futter

  • Call for Submissions: Innovate4Cities Conference
    Call for submissions: Deadline 04 August The Innovate4Cities Conference will be an international gathering at the nexus of cities, climate change science and innovation. This groundbreaking meeting will be co-hosted by UN-Habitat and the Global Covenant of Mayors for Climate and Energy (GCoM). It will bring together over 1,000 city leaders, scientists, researchers, innovators, academics, youth and business people to advance pragmatic and action oriented research and science that will help cities reduce their carbon footprint and increase resilience to climate change. We invite our global network to collaborate with us on the conference program by showcasing the latest science and innovation from academia, city practitioners, policymakers, the private sector, and civil society, helping to bridge the gap between climate ambitions and results. We are calling for submissions with a unique focus on research and innovation across the conference themes, inspired by the Global Research Action Agenda.    
    By: Madeleine Futter
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    Call for Proposals: European Joint Programme
    Closing date for proposals on 7th of September 2021 The European Joint Programme “EJP SOIL - Towards climate-smart sustainable management of agricultural soils” comprise 24 countries committed to the overall goal of providing sustainable agricultural soil management solutions that contribute to key societal challenges including climate change and future food supply. Rationale & Aim of the call The objective of this call is to foster holistic agricultural (forestry soils are not excluded) soil management practices which will assist in making a shift to diversify farming to include a variety of sustainable and environmental practices. Knowledge gaps in the area of SOC sequestration need to be closed, e.g. by developing soil management options which help to protect existing stocks of soil carbon and store additional C through sequestering CO2 from the atmosphere. Effective CO2 sequestration can help reduce GHG emissions thereby helping to fulfil the objectives of the European Green Deal. Another objective is to make a shift from those agricultural practices that contributes to soil degradation, towards, more sustainable practices and methods. This not only addresses sustainable production but also a healthy environment, which can be achieved by, enhancing knowledge about biodiversity, and understanding functionalities and interactions in soils. Strong population growth combined with climate change challenges has placed food security high on the global agenda and therefore it is one of the key elements of the EU’s Farm to Fork strategy. Sustainable production refers to not only healthy soil management but also addresses research in respect of water storage, soil salinization and biodiversity, while considering climate change. Drastic changes are required to some of our current farming systems to modify agriculture’s practises as a provider of adequate, safe and healthy food that is produced in a manner that is sustainable and environmentally friendly. Thus, interested project consortia should apply to one of the three topics: A) Understanding SOC sequestration (stabilization, storage and persistence) B) Soil biodiversity: status, and role in ecosystem services provided by soils C) Site-specific or landscape-scale approaches to improve sustainability, resilience, health, and productivity of soils     To learn more and apply: https://ejpsoil.eu/research-projects/first-external-call-pre-announcement/?utm_source=RUFORUM+Mailing+List&utm_campaign=7ae7ebcd40-RUFORUM+Weekly+-+Vol.3+No.25_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_1fcfbb8a0b-7ae7ebcd40-346973753&ct=t()&goal=0_1fcfbb8a0b-7ae7ebcd40-346973753&mc_cid=7ae7ebcd40&mc_eid=d95cf18a8d 
    By: Madeleine Futter
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  • The Elsevier Foundation Chemistry for Climate Action Challenge
    After 5 successful editions of the Elsevier Foundation Green & Sustainable Chemistry Challenge, and thousands of proposals from around the world, we are proud to re-launch as the Chemistry for Climate Action Challenge. Climate change is the most important challenge affecting the future of our planet and it is essential that we take action. We also know that chemical sciences play a critical role in developing a sustainable future. UN Sustainable Development Goal 13, Climate Action, underscores the need to “[…] promote mechanisms for raising capacity for effective climate change-related planning and management in least developed countries, including focusing on women, youth and local and marginalized communities”. With a new focus on Climate Action, the Challenge also supports SDG5, Gender Equality, recognizing the pivotal role that women play in combating climate change. Projects submitted to the Challenge must integrate a gender dimension (such as addressing the role of women in adapting to climate shifts and participating in policy-making and leadership roles) into their projects. Before submitting your proposal, make sure to read the full description of the Challenge and the criteria with which the proposals will be evaluated. The Elsevier Foundation Chemistry for Climate Action Challengeis jointly run by the Elsevier Foundation and Elsevier’s chemistry journals team. The Challenge is open to individuals and organizations whose projects use green and sustainable chemistry solutions to tackle some of the developing world’s greatest sustainability challenges. Read more about Elsevier and green chemistry. The winning projects will receive a prize of €25,000 each.The winners will be announced at the 6th Green & Sustainable Chemistry Conference, 16-18 November 2021.  
    By: Madeleine Futter
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  • Join the UCLA African Studies Center and the Earth Rights Institute
    Join the UCLA African Studies Center and the Earth Rights Institute for a virtual forum on climate change in Africa   April 19 – 23, 2021   Registration to attend ARCC (via Zoom) is now open:RSVP here   Students interested in Climate Action Design Thinking Session: Register here   Please join us for this great line-up of four distinguished keynote speakers, thematic panels, environmental narratives, an exhibitor’s hall, and a design thinking jam session on climate action.   PLEASE SEE UPDATED ARCC FORUM SCHEDULE AND PANELISTS’ BIOS ATTACHED     All times are listed in Pacific Daylight Time (PDT) (Los Angeles)   UCLA African Studies Center and Earth Rights Institute appreciate the support of the ARCC co-sponsors.     For more information, visithttps://www.international.ucla.edu/asc/article/206676 or email sbreeding@international.ucla.edu or call 323.335.9965.  
    By: Madeleine Futter
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    ACARE's 2020 Annual Report
    Access the 2020 Annual Report for the African Center for Aquatic Research and Education here   "The year 2020 seemed longer than usual. When we looked up from our desks, we realized that it was not actually the 15th month of 2020, but March of 2021. The photo at the right is a perfect representation of our year of interactions. We are excited to share with you our successes and progress from 2020. Despite interacting with you only on screens and trapped in our basements, we grew, and we continue to do so. We look forward to another good year and anticipate we will be seeing you in person soon."  
    By: Madeleine Futter
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