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Water, Energy, And The Environment

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    Call for Applications for the 2022 Ife Institute of Advanced Studies
    Call for Applications for the 2022 Ife Institute of Advanced Studies’ summer institute with doctoral and postdoctoral researchers in the humanities, the social sciences, and STEM affiliated with your institution and related networks.The Ife Summer Institute is an international platform for nurturing a new generation of scholars in the humanities and social sciences held for three years at Ile-Ife in Nigeria, and virtually in 2020-2021 to accommodate COVID-19 pandemic restrictions. The institute hosts participants from all over the world and boasts distinguished faculty engaging contemporary scholarly topics.This year’s Institute will be held both in-person and via Zoom. Certificates of participation will be awarded to all registered participants at the end of the Institute.More details about the online application are available on our website: https://www.ias-ife.com/<https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.ias-ife.com/__;!!HXCxUKc!iFM-iw4Hrc2buEwZzpnc791_EE0KuPMSXRZ8ZM5i6kNVTuvob3AJYw2dQVuqTSc$ .We can also be reached for questions or clarification at  iiasng.office@gmail.com<mailto:iiasng.office@gmail.com  or summerinstituteife.ng@gmail.com<mailto:summerinstituteife.ng@gmail.com>.
    By: Raquel Acosta
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    CALL FOR PAPERS International Journal of Islamic Architecture (IJIA)
    CFP for IJIA Special Issue on Climate Change and the Built Environment in the Islamic World Special Issue: Climate Change and the Built Environment in the Islamic World Thematic volume planned for May 2024 (IJIA 13.2)Proposal submission deadline: April 30, 2022 This special issue of IJIA focuses on the impact of the current climate crisis on the built environments of the Islamic world. Environmentalist scholar and eco-theologist Seyyed Hossein Nasr once said that the natural environment occupies a type of ‘sacred’ space in the world, an elevated position that exists only because nature is ‘always in danger of desecration’ (Chidester and Linenthal 1995). In fact, many scientists are now seeing our current global predicament as evidence of the emergence of a ‘fifth nature’ or ‘post nature’, referring to a world ‘after’ nature or potentially beyond or in addition to it, which expands the central definition of the ‘natural’ to include man-made waste, environmental pollution, and importantly climate change as part and parcel of a lived and living ecosystem (Apotsos and Venter 2020). To this end, this special issue takes up the challenge of unpacking this complex topic by utilizing architecture as a space of discourse for thinking about how one might craft a theory of ‘critical environmentalism’ across the Islamic world. Currently accounting for 40 per cent of the world’s total energy usage per year, the built environment provides a fitting platform for a consideration of climate change and attendant environmental themes such as sustainability –  broadly defined as ‘the endurance of systems and processes’ – towards examining how such realities are made manifest through the lens of diverse spatial templates within Muslim societies around the globe.   To this point, many architectural approaches being explored in the contemporary period as potential solutions to building in an increasingly unstable climatic future are rooted in historical practices, many of which emerged in proto-Islamic lands. Archaeological evidence from North Africa and the Middle East, for example, not only suggest that early civilizations used thermodynamically efficient materials like earth to build in desert environments, but also developed an understanding of how to generate livable microclimates through infrastructural design and engineering. Some of these early approaches have also served as the basis for some of the first modern attempts at crafting climate-appropriate design, spearheaded by architects such as Hassan Fathy (Egypt) and his utilisation of AT (Appropriate Technology), and even certain contemporary structural counterparts like Dubai’s new eco-mosque in Hatta, which opened in 2021 and uses both solar panels to reduce its energy usage and water treatment units to reuse water for irrigation and cleaning due to the lack of potable water sources in the region. Importantly as well, such building projects and approaches also gesture towards shifting conditions and modes of being in the world, realities informed by numerous different perspectives ranging from social, cultural, economic, and even religious modes of existence. In 2021, the Saudi Arabian government issued a fatwa on the topic of water reuse, requiring mosques in both Mecca and Medina to recycle wastewater or ‘grey water’ due to the limited potable water resources in the region and the extreme drain on regional water resources that events like the annual Hajj provoke. Some see this as evidence of the emergence of a ‘Green Deen’, or an approach to sustainability that positions environmental stewardship as a faith-based ordinance.   Contemporary considerations of the effects of climate change on built environments throughout the Islamic world also compel a reconsideration of the continuing fallacy imposed by western Enlightenment thought that the relationship between architecture and the environment is one of mutual exclusion. Although advancements in green technology, the growth of design fields oriented around biomimetic applications, and the development of sustainable building materials such as ‘cradle to cradle’ products are shifting the relationship between built form and the environment in a more cooperative direction, the fact remains that architectural practice continues to position the natural environment as a separate, distinct realm to be studied and above all controlled, a largely non-collaborative system that rarely overlaps with the built environment unless forced and often actively opposes it. To this end, this special issue encourages contributions that explore the role of architecture and the built environment in shaping the contours of current climate change and environmentalist discourse in the context of diverse socio-political, cultural, and economic spheres throughout the Islamic world. Contributions might consider past and present events, circumstances, and spaces that offer different or nonconventional interpretations of environmentalism and even the idea of ‘nature’ itself as a space of multiple perspectives, definitions, and concerns, as well as how communities individually encounter and define environmental concerns and incorporate natural design elements into structural responses and solutions specific to the context. Papers might additionally address how architecture as an analytical mechanism challenges established approaches and tendencies that position the built environment in opposition to environmentalist concerns by recognizing its capacity to act as a type of text composed of multiple narratives and registers of knowledge that reflects the value system and frameworks operating within a society at a particular moment with regards to the environment. Papers should adhere to the IJIA’s remit, which is defined broadly as ‘the historic Islamic world, encompassing the Middle East and parts of Africa and Asia, but also the more recent geographies of Islam in its global dimensions’. Further, contributors should fully exploit the self-reflexive potential of this remit towards addressing a spectrum of critical approaches to the built environment in the Islamic world that not only position architecture as a theatre of environmental performance, but also a platform from which to consider additional conditions revolving around issues of race, gender, ethnicity, culture, and politics as they relate to environmental challenges and concerns. To this end, this special issue not only aims to be strongly interdisciplinary, drawing from fields ranging from urban design, history, architecture, archaeology, sociology, and anthropology, but also accommodate a diversity of discourses that focus on regions, communities, and built environments not widely addressed in scholarship on Islamic space. Such case studies are particularly important toward generating a comparative interrogative approach to effectively consider the ongoing encounter/relationship between humanity and the natural world over time and space. Examples of themes contributors might wish to explore include, but are not limited to, the following: Imagining sustainable futures/architecture as an environmentalist frontier Global warming, climate change, and its social/cultural impacts Natural aesthetics as design inspiration Green architecture in desert environments Environmentalism, heritage, and its discontents Eco-Islam and the ‘Green Deen’ Armed conflict and its environmental impacts/implications Petropolitics and sustainable space Architecture and ecological conservation/preservation Non-traditional/emerging designs, materials, and spaces Colonial/postcolonial frameworks in environmental discourse AT (appropriate technology) Articles offering historical and theoretical analysis (DiT papers) should be between 6000 and 8000 words, and those on design and practice (DiP papers) between 3000 and 4000 words. Practitioners are welcome to contribute insofar as they address the critical framework of the journal. Please send a title and a 400-word abstract to the guest editor, Michelle Apotsos, Williams College (IJIAsustainability@gmail.com), by April 30, 2022. Authors of accepted proposals will be contacted soon thereafter and will be requested to submit full papers by January 30, 2023. All papers will be subject to blind peer review. For author instructions, please consult: www.intellectbooks.com/ijia.
    By: Raquel Acosta
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  • Africa and the Environment: Documenting and Archiving a Changing Climate
    CALL FOR PAPERS   Africa’s natural environment is rich and diverse, ranging from its wildlife and plants to its land and resources. It is also one of the continents most severely affected by climate change, with increasingly erratic weather events adversely impacting biodiversity, agriculture and those living there. This conference will explore library and archive materials relating to Africa and the environment and how they are collected, catalogued, preserved and used in research and teaching. We would welcome papers relating to a range of media including documents and manuscripts, photographs, newspapers, historical printed collections, audio-visual material and born-digital material. Subjects might include: How the archives of individuals and organisations working on environmental issues are being preserved and made available How library and archive materials are used to chart and address climate change How collections are used to research renewable energy in Africa How current field research is being preserved and published How environmental challenges affect libraries and archives in Africa and how they respond Librarians, archivists and researchers are invited to submit abstracts of up to 350 words for consideration to Sarah Rhodes (sarah.rhodes@bodleian.ox.ac.uk) by 31 March 2022. http://scolma.org
    By: Raquel Acosta
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  • Fish4Thought Event
    Fish4Thought Event:Gender-inclusive innovations in aquatic food systems A virtual event to celebrate International Women's Day and highlight the importance of gender-sensitive approaches to empower women actors in aquatic food systems.Tuesday, 8 March 202215:00-16:20 (UTC+8) / 08:00-09:20 (UTC+1) Click here to register and save your spot Growing evidence points to gender equality playing a key role in aquatic food systems’ crucial contributions to achieving the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals. However, despite recent progress in advancing gender equality and women’s empowerment, inequity and barriers still remain in most parts of the world.In this upcoming Fish4Thought virtual event held in conjunction with International Women’s Day, WorldFish's research experts will come together to highlight gender-sensitive approaches that empower women actors and ensure gender-equal opportunities in food, nutrition and income security in aquatic food systems.The presentations will focus on WorldFish’s years of research work in designing and implementing gender-inclusive innovations in response to climate and COVID-19 impacts. The panel of experts will also share regional innovations in aquatic food systems to increase the visibility, agency and leadership capabilities of women in small-scale, artisanal fisheries and aquaculture sectors in Asia, Africa and the Pacific.   
    By: Raquel Acosta
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    TWAS – Women in Climate Action research grants
    To support action-based projects with a direct impact on society, the Elsevier Foundation is partnering with TWAS – the World Academy of Sciences to provide research grants for projects led by women scientists that address concrete problems in climate change through collaboration and interdisciplinary research.   The program is community-focused: a competitive, open call for applications will consider projects that respond to the needs of, and to the development requirements, of the applicants’ community and/or national or regional context in one of the 66 scientifically and technologically lagging country (STLCs). The TWAS-Elsevier Foundation Project Grants Programme for Gender Equity and Climate Action aims to: • Promote gender equality by creating opportunities for women in climate action projects that take them outside the lab, enabling them to deepen their scientific skills, while acquiring, through training, soft skills such as project management and leadership. • Respond to and tackle communities’ needs in ways that are in line with the principles of sustainable development, focusing on the brunt of climatic changes. • Effectively transfer knowledge from scientific research to real-life scenarios for practical and tangible change under the umbrella of the “climate action” SDG. Knowledge deriving from scientific research often suffers from not being applicable to real-life scenarios, especially in the Global South – slowing down tangible improvements. Greater progress in the livelihoods of individuals are achieved when research is done in cooperation with local populations, and when scientific know-how is effectively shared by those living in the same communities. UN Women reports that globally, one fourth of all economically active women are engaged in agriculture, where they regularly contend with climate consequences such as crop failure and experience an unequal burden of care for collecting increasingly scarce water and fuel.   The grants will support women researchers from the Global South to reinforce both scientific and soft skills such as project management, leadership and science diplomacy – with the aim of sustainably improving the livelihood of their entire community by supporting women’s wellbeing.   To learn more: https://elsevierfoundation.org/partnerships/inclusive-research/twas-women-climate-action-research/
    By: Raquel Acosta
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  • AAP Public Dialogue “Climate Adaptation for Africa’s Cities”
    AAP is excited to be hosting our next Public Dialogue “Climate Adaptation for Africa’s Cities” this Wednesday, February 23rd at 8:00am- 9:30am EDT. This dialogue session will be co-hosted by AAP consortium member - University of Cheikh Anta Diop. Climate change is undoubtedly one of Africa’s greatest challenges. This dialogue will focus on the importance of building resilient cities in Africa that can reduce the threats resulting from climate change: droughts, heat waves, landslides, storms, and – especially in coastal areas – floods. As the world recovers from the COVID-19 pandemic, Africa must take the opportunity to leverage rebuilding efforts to achieve environmentally sustainable economies and infrastructure that will engender resilience to climate change and build cities that are more inclusive and resilient. Panelists will share best practices, as well as approaches and resources needed for action.   To learn more/register: https://msu.zoom.us/webinar/register/9816443342295/WN_YMIXxcQCQpauxVheISTFbw 
    By: Raquel Acosta
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    AGRILINKS EVENT: Managing Soils to Address Global Challenges
    Join us for the 2022 USAID Bureau for Resilience and Food Security (USAID/RFS) Research Honorary Lecture, given by 2020 World Food Prize Laureate Rattan Lal. Dr. Lal is recognized globally as a pioneer in soil-centric agricultural management to improve food security and develop climate-resilient agriculture through soil carbon sequestration, sustainable intensification, use efficiency of agroecosystems, sustainable management of soils, and soil health. His career in soil science and international agricultural research spans over 5 decades and four continents.   The lecture and discussion will outline global challenges including food and nutritional insecurity, climate change, soil degradation, water scarcity, and pollution. This presentation will also highlight Dr. Lal’s modeling research for achieving sustainable and resilient production systems to restore soil health. The strategy involves producing more from less and returning land back to nature.    To register: https://primetime.bluejeans.com/a2m/register/sgghvjcz
    By: Raquel Acosta
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  • Virtual Workshop on Water Equity Access
    This workshop will serve as a knowledge transfer for early career researchers and students and we will invite local subject matter experts, entrepreneurs, government leaders, and development agencies to discuss their current and future activities related to water equity access.  We will actively seek opportunities to further expand our research activities through collaborations and educational programs, which would highlight the role of gender in different levels for providing water in different regions of the world.  The workshop will have graduate students (from Nigeria and the U.S.) as the audience.  The mixed format of the workshop will combine seminars and roundtable discussions.  This workshop is intended to inspire students and researchers and build their enthusiasm for science, engineering, and technology.    Sponsored by a Michigan State University African Studies Center Strategic Partnership Grant.   Although the Workshop will be held virtually, there will be audiences gathered at both Michigan State University and the University of Nigeria, Nsukka.   Registration Link: Click here to register (No registration fee)   The details for the workshop can be found at https://www.egr.msu.edu/boehlertgroup/upcoming-events 
    By: Raquel Acosta

  • Promoting climate-smart aquaculture systems A virtual discussion
    A virtual discussion exploring the latest research and technology in aquaculture production systems for improved livelihoods.Thursday, 27 January 202219:00-20:30 (UTC+8) / 13:00-14:30 (UTC+2) Click here to register and save your spot The Advancing Climate-Smart Aquaculture Technologies (ACliSAT) project promotes climate-resilient and sustainable aquaculture practices of the Nile Tilapia for different water and environmental conditions in Egypt, Eritrea, and Ethiopia. The project's work focuses on aquaculture systems such as the Improved Pond Raceway Aquaculture System (IPRAS) and Integrated Aquaculture-Agriculture system (IAA), that optimize water use efficiency and adapt to different environmental conditions are important for successful tilapia farming in arid lands. WorldFish and IFAD are organizing a joint webinar to share the research findings, knowledge, and know-how on the climate-smart aquaculture systems gathered from the ACliSAT project. The webinar aims to promote IPRAS and IAA as production systems that enable intensification of Tilapia production, the efficient use of natural resources and feed nutrients, and managing waste and loss by re-using wastes such as pond water and mud as crop fertilizer.Climate-smart aquaculture systems are of particular importance in mitigating the pressing effects of climate change as well as adapting to the changing climate conditions that directly affect the food security, nutrition, and livelihoods of millions of vulnerable people in developing countries.    Follow WorldFish and the hashtag #aquaticfoods to join the virtual dialogue on Twitter.  We look forward to your active participation. To register: Webinar Registration - Zoom 
    By: Raquel Acosta
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  • 2022 International Conference on Water in Africa
    2022 International Conference on Water in Africa and Workshop on UN Sustainable Goals (3 & 6)    Date: February 9th - 11th, 2022. Venue: Zoom/Princess Alexandria Auditorium (PAA), University of Nigeria, Nsukka                                                      Background Tackling today’s water and health challenges demands not just a scientific conversation but a collaborative approach involving the Humanities, Social Sciences and Natural Sciences. This conference, comprising of both plenary and technical sessions and a workshop, is a convergence of Science and the Arts that provides opportunity for transdisciplinary conversations and frontiers on water and public health. Theme: Towards Successful Delivery of United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals 3 and 6 in Africa. This robust theme accommodates multiple subthemes, including: Aquatic environments and health: Water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) Water treatment and wastewater treatment Water and theatre for development (TfD) Water education, literacy and awareness Water management and governance Water, agriculture and food security Water, women and gender concerns Water security and climate change Water risk and resilience assessments Hydrogeology, hydro-informatics and modelling Bioactive agents from aquatic ecosystems Bioenergy and biochemicals from wastewater   Abstract submission We invite scholars, non-governmental organisations, community-based organisations, civil societies, government organizations  and development agencies to submit abstracts of no more than 250 words (in MS Word, single-line spacing and Time New Roman font 12) to the conference email (waterconference@unn.edu.ng). The deadline for abstract submission is January 21,22   Contact the organizers via email (waterconference@unn.edu.ng)
    By: Vincent Chigor
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    USAID Administrator Samantha Power: A New Vision for Global Development
    USAID Administrator Samantha Power delivers remarks outlining a bold vision for the future of the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and inclusive development around the world. The speech takes place as USAID celebrates its 60th anniversary. Administrator Samantha Power's remarks will be followed by a conversation with 2020 USAID Payne Fellow Katryna Mahoney
    By: Derek Tobias
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    Conservation, Food, & Health Foundation Grant
    The Conservation, Food and Health Foundation seeks to protect natural resources, improve the production and distribution of food, and promote public health in Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East.  The foundation helps build the capacity of organizations and coalitions with grants that support research or improve the learning and generation of local solutions to complex problems.   The foundation supports projects that demonstrate local leadership and promote professional development in the conservation, agricultural, and health sciences; develop the capacity of local organizations; and address a particular problem or question in the field.  It prefers to support projects that address under-funded issues and geographic areas. The foundation supports special projects and programs of non-governmental organizations in three areas: conservation, food, and health. Examples of areas of interest within these fields follow, but are not meant to be exclusive.   Conservation Conservation grants help improve ecological and environmental conditions in low- and middle-income countries.  The foundation supports field research and related research activities, training, and technical assistance efforts that: help conserve ecosystems and protect biodiversity train local leaders in conservation and protection of resources, with an emphasis on technical and scientific training Food Food grants help research-based efforts to improve food and nutrition security and improve natural resources and ecosystems.  Areas of interest include projects that: promote or develop specific sustainable agriculture practices with potential to advance science and practice in other countries; test and refine innovative education and training interventions for small scale farmers; and advance new approaches to control pests and diseases affecting important food crops in low-income countries. Health The foundation supports public health programs that focus on populations rather than individuals.  It funds programs that emphasize disease prevention and health promotion over those that emphasize disease diagnosis, treatment, and care.  It supports research, technical assistance, and training projects that: improve public health through community-based efforts that address health promotion, disease prevention, family planning, and reproductive health; and increase the understanding and treatment of neglected tropical diseases The foundation supports most types of non-governmental organizations that can provide evidence of their nongovernmental status or charitable purpose. In general, the foundation will support: Non-governmental organizations (NGO) Nonprofit organizations Civil society organizations Community-based organizations Colleges, universities and academic institutions The foundation does not support businesses, government agencies,  humanitarian aid organizations, other foundations or churches.   For more information or to apply isit the CFH Foundation website.
    By: Derek Tobias
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